Northern Ireland's Environmental Industry: An Examination of the Eco-Capital Equipment Producing Sector

Martin Eaton, Thomas Stark

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    In common with much of the rest of the European Union, Northern Ireland has a small but important and expanding environmental industry. The region's 'green economy' employs almost 13000 people and is projected to grow by a further 4000-6000 jobs by the end of the millennium. This article focuses upon one small-scale sub-sector - the eco-capital equipment producers - and analyses their recent industrial performance in the context of current regional development/industrial strategy theory. Drawing on empirical survey, comment is made on the sector's employment characteristics, production sequences, market structures and business operating experiences. Based on this discussion, a series of suggestions is offered that could help central and regional government improve the performance of the industry, and, in turn, the economy of the region, still further.
    LanguageEnglish
    Pages108-119
    JournalBusiness Strategy and the Environment
    Volume8
    Issue number2
    Publication statusPublished - 1999

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    industrial performance
    examination
    economy
    industry
    regional development
    performance
    European Union
    producer
    market
    experience
    environmental industry
    Northern Ireland
    Industry
    green economy
    Regional development
    Market structure
    Empirical survey
    Strategy theory
    Industrial performance
    Regional government

    Cite this

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    abstract = "In common with much of the rest of the European Union, Northern Ireland has a small but important and expanding environmental industry. The region's 'green economy' employs almost 13000 people and is projected to grow by a further 4000-6000 jobs by the end of the millennium. This article focuses upon one small-scale sub-sector - the eco-capital equipment producers - and analyses their recent industrial performance in the context of current regional development/industrial strategy theory. Drawing on empirical survey, comment is made on the sector's employment characteristics, production sequences, market structures and business operating experiences. Based on this discussion, a series of suggestions is offered that could help central and regional government improve the performance of the industry, and, in turn, the economy of the region, still further.",
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    Northern Ireland's Environmental Industry: An Examination of the Eco-Capital Equipment Producing Sector. / Eaton, Martin; Stark, Thomas.

    In: Business Strategy and the Environment, Vol. 8, No. 2, 1999, p. 108-119.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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    AU - Stark, Thomas

    PY - 1999

    Y1 - 1999

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    AB - In common with much of the rest of the European Union, Northern Ireland has a small but important and expanding environmental industry. The region's 'green economy' employs almost 13000 people and is projected to grow by a further 4000-6000 jobs by the end of the millennium. This article focuses upon one small-scale sub-sector - the eco-capital equipment producers - and analyses their recent industrial performance in the context of current regional development/industrial strategy theory. Drawing on empirical survey, comment is made on the sector's employment characteristics, production sequences, market structures and business operating experiences. Based on this discussion, a series of suggestions is offered that could help central and regional government improve the performance of the industry, and, in turn, the economy of the region, still further.

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    EP - 119

    JO - Business Strategy and the Environment

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