Modelling the co-occurrence of psychosis-like experiences and childhood sexual abuse

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6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose Recurrent research evidence indicates that
childhood sexual abuse (CSA) is associated with psychosis
and psychosis-like experiences (PLEs). Many individuals
however who have experienced psychosis have never been
sexually abused in childhood and many individuals who
have experienced CSA have never experienced psychosis.
Method The current study sought to model the cooccurrence
of CSA and PLEs using data from the Adult
Psychiatric Morbidity Survey. Latent class analysis was
employed to identify distinct classes of individuals in the
general population who were characterised by the presence,
co-occurrence or absence of PLEs and/or CSA. Multinomial
logistic regression analysis was utilised to validate
membership of classes characterised by both CSA and
PLEs using a series of variables that have been proposed to
delineate the co-occurrence of these phenomena.
Results Four hypothesised classes were identified, (1) a
CSA–PLE co-occurrence class, (2) a PLE-only class, (3) a
CSA-only class and (4) a CSA and PLE free baseline class.
CSA–PLE co-occurrence was characterised by neurotic
disorder, social isolation, adult sexual molestation and a
history of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PLE
occurrence in the absence of CSA was characterised by
neurotic disorder, social isolation, a history of PTSD,
childhood physical abuse, and uniquely by discrimination
and non-sexual trauma post-16 years.
Conclusions The findings indicated that a distinct group
of individuals in the population was characterised by the
co-occurrence of CSA and PLEs. In the absence of CSA,
individuals who experienced PLEs were likely to endure a
wide range of other, non-sexual, traumatic and adverse
experiences. The CSA–PLE co-occurrence class and its
associated psychosocial risk profile was discussed in relation
to established trauma-based perspectives of psychosis
and PLEs.
LanguageEnglish
Pages1037-1044
JournalSocial Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology
Volume49
Issue number7
Early online date23 Feb 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 Jul 2014

Fingerprint

psychosis
Sex Offenses
Psychotic Disorders
sexual violence
childhood
experience
Social Isolation
posttraumatic stress disorder
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders
trauma
social isolation
Wounds and Injuries
morbidity
Population
regression analysis
abuse

Keywords

  • Epidemiology
  • Latent class analysis
  • Trauma
  • Psychosocial risk

Cite this

@article{eb20ac2568e641b48effffccc235edbc,
title = "Modelling the co-occurrence of psychosis-like experiences and childhood sexual abuse",
abstract = "Purpose Recurrent research evidence indicates thatchildhood sexual abuse (CSA) is associated with psychosisand psychosis-like experiences (PLEs). Many individualshowever who have experienced psychosis have never beensexually abused in childhood and many individuals whohave experienced CSA have never experienced psychosis.Method The current study sought to model the cooccurrenceof CSA and PLEs using data from the AdultPsychiatric Morbidity Survey. Latent class analysis wasemployed to identify distinct classes of individuals in thegeneral population who were characterised by the presence,co-occurrence or absence of PLEs and/or CSA. Multinomiallogistic regression analysis was utilised to validatemembership of classes characterised by both CSA andPLEs using a series of variables that have been proposed todelineate the co-occurrence of these phenomena.Results Four hypothesised classes were identified, (1) aCSA–PLE co-occurrence class, (2) a PLE-only class, (3) aCSA-only class and (4) a CSA and PLE free baseline class.CSA–PLE co-occurrence was characterised by neuroticdisorder, social isolation, adult sexual molestation and ahistory of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PLEoccurrence in the absence of CSA was characterised byneurotic disorder, social isolation, a history of PTSD,childhood physical abuse, and uniquely by discriminationand non-sexual trauma post-16 years.Conclusions The findings indicated that a distinct groupof individuals in the population was characterised by theco-occurrence of CSA and PLEs. In the absence of CSA,individuals who experienced PLEs were likely to endure awide range of other, non-sexual, traumatic and adverseexperiences. The CSA–PLE co-occurrence class and itsassociated psychosocial risk profile was discussed in relationto established trauma-based perspectives of psychosisand PLEs.",
keywords = "Epidemiology, Latent class analysis, Trauma, Psychosocial risk",
author = "J Murphy and Mark Shevlin and JE Houston and Gary Adamson",
year = "2014",
month = "7",
day = "31",
doi = "10.1007/s00127-014-0845-9",
language = "English",
volume = "49",
pages = "1037--1044",
journal = "Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology",
issn = "0933-7954",
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T1 - Modelling the co-occurrence of psychosis-like experiences and childhood sexual abuse

AU - Murphy, J

AU - Shevlin, Mark

AU - Houston, JE

AU - Adamson, Gary

PY - 2014/7/31

Y1 - 2014/7/31

N2 - Purpose Recurrent research evidence indicates thatchildhood sexual abuse (CSA) is associated with psychosisand psychosis-like experiences (PLEs). Many individualshowever who have experienced psychosis have never beensexually abused in childhood and many individuals whohave experienced CSA have never experienced psychosis.Method The current study sought to model the cooccurrenceof CSA and PLEs using data from the AdultPsychiatric Morbidity Survey. Latent class analysis wasemployed to identify distinct classes of individuals in thegeneral population who were characterised by the presence,co-occurrence or absence of PLEs and/or CSA. Multinomiallogistic regression analysis was utilised to validatemembership of classes characterised by both CSA andPLEs using a series of variables that have been proposed todelineate the co-occurrence of these phenomena.Results Four hypothesised classes were identified, (1) aCSA–PLE co-occurrence class, (2) a PLE-only class, (3) aCSA-only class and (4) a CSA and PLE free baseline class.CSA–PLE co-occurrence was characterised by neuroticdisorder, social isolation, adult sexual molestation and ahistory of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PLEoccurrence in the absence of CSA was characterised byneurotic disorder, social isolation, a history of PTSD,childhood physical abuse, and uniquely by discriminationand non-sexual trauma post-16 years.Conclusions The findings indicated that a distinct groupof individuals in the population was characterised by theco-occurrence of CSA and PLEs. In the absence of CSA,individuals who experienced PLEs were likely to endure awide range of other, non-sexual, traumatic and adverseexperiences. The CSA–PLE co-occurrence class and itsassociated psychosocial risk profile was discussed in relationto established trauma-based perspectives of psychosisand PLEs.

AB - Purpose Recurrent research evidence indicates thatchildhood sexual abuse (CSA) is associated with psychosisand psychosis-like experiences (PLEs). Many individualshowever who have experienced psychosis have never beensexually abused in childhood and many individuals whohave experienced CSA have never experienced psychosis.Method The current study sought to model the cooccurrenceof CSA and PLEs using data from the AdultPsychiatric Morbidity Survey. Latent class analysis wasemployed to identify distinct classes of individuals in thegeneral population who were characterised by the presence,co-occurrence or absence of PLEs and/or CSA. Multinomiallogistic regression analysis was utilised to validatemembership of classes characterised by both CSA andPLEs using a series of variables that have been proposed todelineate the co-occurrence of these phenomena.Results Four hypothesised classes were identified, (1) aCSA–PLE co-occurrence class, (2) a PLE-only class, (3) aCSA-only class and (4) a CSA and PLE free baseline class.CSA–PLE co-occurrence was characterised by neuroticdisorder, social isolation, adult sexual molestation and ahistory of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PLEoccurrence in the absence of CSA was characterised byneurotic disorder, social isolation, a history of PTSD,childhood physical abuse, and uniquely by discriminationand non-sexual trauma post-16 years.Conclusions The findings indicated that a distinct groupof individuals in the population was characterised by theco-occurrence of CSA and PLEs. In the absence of CSA,individuals who experienced PLEs were likely to endure awide range of other, non-sexual, traumatic and adverseexperiences. The CSA–PLE co-occurrence class and itsassociated psychosocial risk profile was discussed in relationto established trauma-based perspectives of psychosisand PLEs.

KW - Epidemiology

KW - Latent class analysis

KW - Trauma

KW - Psychosocial risk

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U2 - 10.1007/s00127-014-0845-9

DO - 10.1007/s00127-014-0845-9

M3 - Article

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SP - 1037

EP - 1044

JO - Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology

T2 - Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology

JF - Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology

SN - 0933-7954

IS - 7

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