Mind the (Performance) Gap: Embracing Technology to Enhance On-Site Performance

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The demand for low energy buildings is something which will only increase over the coming years due to both a top down approach from government, in terms of legislation, and a bottom up approach from clients who are becoming more informed in relation to performance related aspects. Low energy design calls for a reconsideration of how buildings are designed and constructed, with materials and detailing being a key part of the process. A performance gap in the sector has been identified between the predicted performance of buildings at the design stage and how they actually perform once constructed. This can occur for a variety of reasons including poor workmanship and on-site practice, substitution of materials from those originally specified and a lack of inspection and validation in terms of what is being constructed. This is an area requiring urgent consideration to ensure clients are getting the buildings they pay for and projected carbon emission targets are accurate. This study highlights the performance gap from a Northern Ireland perspective, investigating issues with low energy design via a case study methodology. The study identifies issues in relation to on-site practice, verification and lack of communication between design team members before investigating how technological advancements and BIM processes can assist. The paper concludes by proposing a scaffolding approach which could allow for a more robust system, potentially closing the aforementioned performance gap.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationArchitectural Technology at the Interfaces
Subtitle of host publicationConference Proceedings of the 7th International Congress of Architectural Technology
EditorsTahar Kouider, Gareth Alexander
Pages219-230
Number of pages12
Publication statusPublished - 15 Jun 2018
EventInternational Congress on Architectural Technology - Ulster University, Belfast, United Kingdom
Duration: 14 Jun 201916 Sep 2019
https://www.ulster.ac.uk/conference/icat-2018

Conference

ConferenceInternational Congress on Architectural Technology
Abbreviated titleICAT 2018
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityBelfast
Period14/06/1916/09/19
Internet address

Fingerprint

Substitution reactions
Inspection
Carbon
Communication

Keywords

  • Building Performance
  • Technology
  • BIM

Cite this

O'Kane, E., Comiskey, D., & Alexander, G. (2018). Mind the (Performance) Gap: Embracing Technology to Enhance On-Site Performance. In T. Kouider, & G. Alexander (Eds.), Architectural Technology at the Interfaces: Conference Proceedings of the 7th International Congress of Architectural Technology (pp. 219-230)
O'Kane, Erin ; Comiskey, David ; Alexander, Gareth. / Mind the (Performance) Gap : Embracing Technology to Enhance On-Site Performance. Architectural Technology at the Interfaces: Conference Proceedings of the 7th International Congress of Architectural Technology. editor / Tahar Kouider ; Gareth Alexander. 2018. pp. 219-230
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abstract = "The demand for low energy buildings is something which will only increase over the coming years due to both a top down approach from government, in terms of legislation, and a bottom up approach from clients who are becoming more informed in relation to performance related aspects. Low energy design calls for a reconsideration of how buildings are designed and constructed, with materials and detailing being a key part of the process. A performance gap in the sector has been identified between the predicted performance of buildings at the design stage and how they actually perform once constructed. This can occur for a variety of reasons including poor workmanship and on-site practice, substitution of materials from those originally specified and a lack of inspection and validation in terms of what is being constructed. This is an area requiring urgent consideration to ensure clients are getting the buildings they pay for and projected carbon emission targets are accurate. This study highlights the performance gap from a Northern Ireland perspective, investigating issues with low energy design via a case study methodology. The study identifies issues in relation to on-site practice, verification and lack of communication between design team members before investigating how technological advancements and BIM processes can assist. The paper concludes by proposing a scaffolding approach which could allow for a more robust system, potentially closing the aforementioned performance gap.",
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O'Kane, E, Comiskey, D & Alexander, G 2018, Mind the (Performance) Gap: Embracing Technology to Enhance On-Site Performance. in T Kouider & G Alexander (eds), Architectural Technology at the Interfaces: Conference Proceedings of the 7th International Congress of Architectural Technology. pp. 219-230, International Congress on Architectural Technology, Belfast, United Kingdom, 14/06/19.

Mind the (Performance) Gap : Embracing Technology to Enhance On-Site Performance. / O'Kane, Erin; Comiskey, David; Alexander, Gareth.

Architectural Technology at the Interfaces: Conference Proceedings of the 7th International Congress of Architectural Technology. ed. / Tahar Kouider; Gareth Alexander. 2018. p. 219-230.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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O'Kane E, Comiskey D, Alexander G. Mind the (Performance) Gap: Embracing Technology to Enhance On-Site Performance. In Kouider T, Alexander G, editors, Architectural Technology at the Interfaces: Conference Proceedings of the 7th International Congress of Architectural Technology. 2018. p. 219-230