Meso-scale modelling of aeolian sediment input to coastal dunes

Irene Delgado-Fernandez

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    34 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The collection of a time series coupling hourly wind data (speed and direction) with sand transport over months has provided new insights into the dynamics of transport events that input sediment to the foredune at Greenwich Dunes, Prince Edward Island National Park, Canada. This paper summarises the key aspects of aeolian sedimentmovement for a period of 9 months and presents amodelling approach for resolving aeolian transport to coastal dunes at the meso-scale. The main hypothesis of the modelling approach is that a small number of key factors control both the occurrence and the magnitude of transport events. Thresholds associated with these factors may be used to filter the time series and isolate potential transport periods over the year. The impacts of nearshore processes are included in the approach as part of the dynamics of coastal dunes, as are supply-limiting factors and trade-offs between fetch distances, angle of wind approach, and beach dimensions. A simple analytical procedure, based on previously published equations, is carried out to assess the general viability of the conceptual approach. Results show that the incorporation of moisture and fetch effects in the calculation of transport for isolated potential transport periods result in improved predictions of sediment input to the dune. Net changes, measured with three different techniques, suggest that survey data with coarse temporal resolution underestimates the amount of sand input to the dune, because sediment is often removed from the embryo dune and foredune by other processes such as wave scarping. Predictions obtained by the proposed modelling approach are of the same order of magnitude as measured deposition andmuch less than predicted bymodels based solely onwind speed and direction. Areas for improvement and alternative modelling approaches, such as probabilistic approaches similar to weather forecasting, are covered in the discussion.
    LanguageEnglish
    Pages230-243
    JournalGeomorphology
    Volume130
    Publication statusPublished - 2011

    Fingerprint

    dune
    sediment
    modeling
    fetch
    time series
    sand
    weather forecasting
    prediction
    limiting factor
    embryo
    viability
    national park
    beach
    moisture
    filter

    Cite this

    Delgado-Fernandez, Irene. / Meso-scale modelling of aeolian sediment input to coastal dunes. In: Geomorphology. 2011 ; Vol. 130. pp. 230-243.
    @article{89f633bd03344cbaa4d8491daa8ef90c,
    title = "Meso-scale modelling of aeolian sediment input to coastal dunes",
    abstract = "The collection of a time series coupling hourly wind data (speed and direction) with sand transport over months has provided new insights into the dynamics of transport events that input sediment to the foredune at Greenwich Dunes, Prince Edward Island National Park, Canada. This paper summarises the key aspects of aeolian sedimentmovement for a period of 9 months and presents amodelling approach for resolving aeolian transport to coastal dunes at the meso-scale. The main hypothesis of the modelling approach is that a small number of key factors control both the occurrence and the magnitude of transport events. Thresholds associated with these factors may be used to filter the time series and isolate potential transport periods over the year. The impacts of nearshore processes are included in the approach as part of the dynamics of coastal dunes, as are supply-limiting factors and trade-offs between fetch distances, angle of wind approach, and beach dimensions. A simple analytical procedure, based on previously published equations, is carried out to assess the general viability of the conceptual approach. Results show that the incorporation of moisture and fetch effects in the calculation of transport for isolated potential transport periods result in improved predictions of sediment input to the dune. Net changes, measured with three different techniques, suggest that survey data with coarse temporal resolution underestimates the amount of sand input to the dune, because sediment is often removed from the embryo dune and foredune by other processes such as wave scarping. Predictions obtained by the proposed modelling approach are of the same order of magnitude as measured deposition andmuch less than predicted bymodels based solely onwind speed and direction. Areas for improvement and alternative modelling approaches, such as probabilistic approaches similar to weather forecasting, are covered in the discussion.",
    author = "Irene Delgado-Fernandez",
    year = "2011",
    language = "English",
    volume = "130",
    pages = "230--243",
    journal = "Geomorphology",
    issn = "0169-555X",
    publisher = "Elsevier",

    }

    Delgado-Fernandez, I 2011, 'Meso-scale modelling of aeolian sediment input to coastal dunes', Geomorphology, vol. 130, pp. 230-243.

    Meso-scale modelling of aeolian sediment input to coastal dunes. / Delgado-Fernandez, Irene.

    In: Geomorphology, Vol. 130, 2011, p. 230-243.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Meso-scale modelling of aeolian sediment input to coastal dunes

    AU - Delgado-Fernandez, Irene

    PY - 2011

    Y1 - 2011

    N2 - The collection of a time series coupling hourly wind data (speed and direction) with sand transport over months has provided new insights into the dynamics of transport events that input sediment to the foredune at Greenwich Dunes, Prince Edward Island National Park, Canada. This paper summarises the key aspects of aeolian sedimentmovement for a period of 9 months and presents amodelling approach for resolving aeolian transport to coastal dunes at the meso-scale. The main hypothesis of the modelling approach is that a small number of key factors control both the occurrence and the magnitude of transport events. Thresholds associated with these factors may be used to filter the time series and isolate potential transport periods over the year. The impacts of nearshore processes are included in the approach as part of the dynamics of coastal dunes, as are supply-limiting factors and trade-offs between fetch distances, angle of wind approach, and beach dimensions. A simple analytical procedure, based on previously published equations, is carried out to assess the general viability of the conceptual approach. Results show that the incorporation of moisture and fetch effects in the calculation of transport for isolated potential transport periods result in improved predictions of sediment input to the dune. Net changes, measured with three different techniques, suggest that survey data with coarse temporal resolution underestimates the amount of sand input to the dune, because sediment is often removed from the embryo dune and foredune by other processes such as wave scarping. Predictions obtained by the proposed modelling approach are of the same order of magnitude as measured deposition andmuch less than predicted bymodels based solely onwind speed and direction. Areas for improvement and alternative modelling approaches, such as probabilistic approaches similar to weather forecasting, are covered in the discussion.

    AB - The collection of a time series coupling hourly wind data (speed and direction) with sand transport over months has provided new insights into the dynamics of transport events that input sediment to the foredune at Greenwich Dunes, Prince Edward Island National Park, Canada. This paper summarises the key aspects of aeolian sedimentmovement for a period of 9 months and presents amodelling approach for resolving aeolian transport to coastal dunes at the meso-scale. The main hypothesis of the modelling approach is that a small number of key factors control both the occurrence and the magnitude of transport events. Thresholds associated with these factors may be used to filter the time series and isolate potential transport periods over the year. The impacts of nearshore processes are included in the approach as part of the dynamics of coastal dunes, as are supply-limiting factors and trade-offs between fetch distances, angle of wind approach, and beach dimensions. A simple analytical procedure, based on previously published equations, is carried out to assess the general viability of the conceptual approach. Results show that the incorporation of moisture and fetch effects in the calculation of transport for isolated potential transport periods result in improved predictions of sediment input to the dune. Net changes, measured with three different techniques, suggest that survey data with coarse temporal resolution underestimates the amount of sand input to the dune, because sediment is often removed from the embryo dune and foredune by other processes such as wave scarping. Predictions obtained by the proposed modelling approach are of the same order of magnitude as measured deposition andmuch less than predicted bymodels based solely onwind speed and direction. Areas for improvement and alternative modelling approaches, such as probabilistic approaches similar to weather forecasting, are covered in the discussion.

    M3 - Article

    VL - 130

    SP - 230

    EP - 243

    JO - Geomorphology

    T2 - Geomorphology

    JF - Geomorphology

    SN - 0169-555X

    ER -