MENTAL HEALTH AND ORGANISATIONAL CHANGEMental health worker’s perception of role stress, self-efficacy and organisational climate regarding the ethos of recovery

Roger Manktelow, Aidan MacAteer, Lelia Fitzsimons

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    1 Citation (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The recent organisational changes in mental health service delivery with their increasing emphasis on implementing and evaluating recovery-oriented practice have implications for ongoing professional development. This study examined the relationship between work-related self-efficacy, organisational climate in terms of perceived service resilience and the organisational conditions of role conflict and role ambiguity. A survey of members of community and hospital mental health multi-disciplinary teams in a Northern Ireland Health and Social Care integrated Trust was conducted. Sixty-seven of a sample of one hundred and ten mental health staff, including social workers, nurses, occupational therapists and day care workers, in three service settings including hospital, community and day care, completed a thirty eight item questionnaire. The questionnaire contained four scales measuring organisational change, self-efficacy, and role conflict and role ambiguity. Results showed that there were strong negative correlations between organisational climate and role stressors, and a negative correlation of moderate significance between self- efficacy and role ambiguity. The researchers suggest that task-specific, self-efficacy measures could be used routinely with increased reflective practice to promote a reduction in role ambiguity. The continued use of personal and professional recovery-enhancing measures as part of service evaluation is also advocated.
    LanguageEnglish
    Pages737-755
    JournalBritish Journal of Social Work
    Volume46
    DOIs
    Publication statusAccepted/In press - 1 Jun 2015

    Fingerprint

    Self Efficacy
    self-efficacy
    Mental Health
    mental health
    climate
    worker
    Health
    Organizational Innovation
    health
    role conflict
    day care
    organizational change
    occupational therapist
    Northern Ireland
    questionnaire
    Community Hospital
    Mental Health Services
    resilience
    community
    social worker

    Keywords

    • Recovery in Mental Health
    • Organisational Change
    • Self Efficacy
    • Mental Health Professionals/Practitioners
    • Role Conflict/ Ambiguity
    • Reflective Practice

    Cite this

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    abstract = "The recent organisational changes in mental health service delivery with their increasing emphasis on implementing and evaluating recovery-oriented practice have implications for ongoing professional development. This study examined the relationship between work-related self-efficacy, organisational climate in terms of perceived service resilience and the organisational conditions of role conflict and role ambiguity. A survey of members of community and hospital mental health multi-disciplinary teams in a Northern Ireland Health and Social Care integrated Trust was conducted. Sixty-seven of a sample of one hundred and ten mental health staff, including social workers, nurses, occupational therapists and day care workers, in three service settings including hospital, community and day care, completed a thirty eight item questionnaire. The questionnaire contained four scales measuring organisational change, self-efficacy, and role conflict and role ambiguity. Results showed that there were strong negative correlations between organisational climate and role stressors, and a negative correlation of moderate significance between self- efficacy and role ambiguity. The researchers suggest that task-specific, self-efficacy measures could be used routinely with increased reflective practice to promote a reduction in role ambiguity. The continued use of personal and professional recovery-enhancing measures as part of service evaluation is also advocated.",
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    MENTAL HEALTH AND ORGANISATIONAL CHANGEMental health worker’s perception of role stress, self-efficacy and organisational climate regarding the ethos of recovery. / Manktelow, Roger; MacAteer, Aidan; Fitzsimons, Lelia.

    In: British Journal of Social Work, Vol. 46, 01.06.2015, p. 737-755.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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