McHugh, C. J. 2016. ‘The Crinson Jug from clay to the grave (and beyond): exploring the ceramic object as a gathering point’

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    Abstract

    This is an imagined account of what might have happened to my artworks, Crinson Jug (2012) and associated pieces, after they were lost at an art fair in Shanghai in March 2013. Have they already entered the archaeological record, perhaps on a landfill site somewhere in Shanghai, or will they be found and kept for posterity by a loving owner? Enquiries have been to no avail and, as the fate of these items remains unknown, a story must suffice. In this essay, I want to trace the ‘life history’ of the jug from its beginning as porcelain clay to its last known whereabouts. Although it has been removed from currency, in discussing the jug’s pre-loss career, I will show how it became animated and activated through a process of making, display and engagement with the community. While monuments are often problematised as ‘crystallised’ sites of forgetting (Nora, 1989; Connerton, 2009), it is argued here that, like the jug, ceramic objects have the potential to form dynamic loci of social creativity and remembrance. This incident is worthy of discussion as it demonstrates how such objects, invested with the toil of human endeavour and possessing the potential to affect (Dudley, 2010) and evoke (Turkle, 2007), can become catalysts in the mediation of complex human-object relationships.
    LanguageEnglish
    Title of host publicationContemporary Clay and Museum Culture
    EditorsChristie Brown, Julian Stair, Clare Twomey
    Place of PublicationLondon
    Pages121-131
    Publication statusPublished - 8 Jul 2016

    Fingerprint

    monument
    currency
    mediation
    creativity
    incident
    career
    art
    community

    Keywords

    • ceramics
    • sunderland
    • pottery
    • engagement
    • archaeology

    Cite this

    McHugh, C. (2016). McHugh, C. J. 2016. ‘The Crinson Jug from clay to the grave (and beyond): exploring the ceramic object as a gathering point’. In C. Brown, J. Stair, & C. Twomey (Eds.), Contemporary Clay and Museum Culture (pp. 121-131). London.
    McHugh, Christopher. / McHugh, C. J. 2016. ‘The Crinson Jug from clay to the grave (and beyond): exploring the ceramic object as a gathering point’. Contemporary Clay and Museum Culture. editor / Christie Brown ; Julian Stair ; Clare Twomey. London, 2016. pp. 121-131
    @inbook{c59d2c1c25944f888e73d721d0f9e3f0,
    title = "McHugh, C. J. 2016. ‘The Crinson Jug from clay to the grave (and beyond): exploring the ceramic object as a gathering point’",
    abstract = "This is an imagined account of what might have happened to my artworks, Crinson Jug (2012) and associated pieces, after they were lost at an art fair in Shanghai in March 2013. Have they already entered the archaeological record, perhaps on a landfill site somewhere in Shanghai, or will they be found and kept for posterity by a loving owner? Enquiries have been to no avail and, as the fate of these items remains unknown, a story must suffice. In this essay, I want to trace the ‘life history’ of the jug from its beginning as porcelain clay to its last known whereabouts. Although it has been removed from currency, in discussing the jug’s pre-loss career, I will show how it became animated and activated through a process of making, display and engagement with the community. While monuments are often problematised as ‘crystallised’ sites of forgetting (Nora, 1989; Connerton, 2009), it is argued here that, like the jug, ceramic objects have the potential to form dynamic loci of social creativity and remembrance. This incident is worthy of discussion as it demonstrates how such objects, invested with the toil of human endeavour and possessing the potential to affect (Dudley, 2010) and evoke (Turkle, 2007), can become catalysts in the mediation of complex human-object relationships.",
    keywords = "ceramics, sunderland, pottery, engagement, archaeology",
    author = "Christopher McHugh",
    note = "Reference text: Adams, J., 2014. Making the Past Present: Paul Montague in New Caledonia. In: Corpus Christi College, University of Cambridge, Pacific Presences: Oceanic art and European museums. [conference] Cambridge, UK, 24 March 2014. Adamson, G., 2010. Introduction to M. Heidegger’s ‘The Thing’, 1971. In: G. Adamson, ed. 2010, The Craft Reader. Oxford: Berg. pp. 404–408. Bleecker, J., 2006. Why Things Matter: A manifesto for networked objects – cohabiting with pigeons, arphids, and AIBOs in the internet of things. In: F. Candlin and R. Guins, eds. 2009. The Object Reader. London: Routledge. pp. 165–74. Brown, C., 2014. Venturing Beyond the Field of Vision. In: University of Westminster, Ceramics in the Expanded Field Conference. London, UK, 18 July 2014. Brown, G.R., 2012. Interaction, Intervention and the Will to Preserve, [online] Available at: <http://www.ceramics-in-the-expanded-field.com/essays/glen-r-brown-phd-usa> [Accessed 2 July 2014]. Chua, L. and Elliott, M. eds, 2013. Distributed Objects: Meaning and mattering after Alfred Gell. Oxford: Bergahn. Connerton, P., 2009. How Modernity Forgets. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Davison, N., 2013. Rivers of Blood: The dead pigs rotting in China’s water supply. The Guardian [online] 29 March. Available at: <http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/mar/29/dead-pigs-china-water-supply> [Accessed 31 October 2013]. Dudley, S., 2010. Museum Materialities: Objects, sense and feeling. In: S. Dudley, ed. 2010. Museum Materialities: Objects, engagements, interpretations. London: Routledge. pp. 1–17. Gates, T., 2014. Five Brick Stories. In: University of Westminster, Ceramics in the Expanded Field Conference. London, UK, 17 July 2014. Gauntlett, D., 2011. Making is Connecting: The social meaning of creativity, from DIY and knitting to YouTube and Web 2.0. Cambridge: Polity Press. Gell, A., 1998. Art and Agency: An anthropological theory. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Gosden, C., 2004a. Making and Display: Our aesthetic appreciation of things and objects. In: C. Renfrew, C. Godsen and E. DeMarrais, eds. 2004. Substance, Memory and Display: Archaeology and art, Cambridge: McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research. pp. 35–45. Gosden, C., 2004b. Aesthetics, Intelligence and Emotions: Implications for archaeology. In: E. DeMarrais, C. Gosden, and C. Renfrew, eds. 2004. Rethinking Materiality: the engagement of mind with the material world. Cambridge: McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research. pp. 33–40. Heidegger, M., 1971. Poetry, Language, Thought, Translated by A. Hofstadter. New York: Harper & Row, Publishers, Inc. Hodder, I., 2012. Entangled: An archaeology of the relationships between humans and things. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell. Holmes, A., 2012. Anne Holmes’ Family History: My connection to the Crinson family of potters, What’s Your Story? Discovering family history. [online] Available at <http://www.whatsyourstory.org.uk/page_id__182_path__0p3p.aspx> [Accessed 10 July 2014]. Holtorf, C., 2002. Notes on the Life History of a Pot Sherd. Journal of Material Culture, 7(1), pp. 49–71. Holtorf, C., 2004. ‘Incavation – Excavation – Exhibition’. In: N. Brodie and C. Hills, eds. 2004. Material Engagements: Studies in honour of Colin Renfrew. Cambridge: McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research. pp. 45–53. Hyde, S., 2012. Milburn Family History: My connection to William Milburn, 1771–1849, Master Potter of Scott’s Pottery Sunderland. What’s Your Story: Discovering family history. [online] Available at: <http://www.whatsyourstory.org.uk/page_id__177_path__0p3p.aspx#return> [Accessed 10 July 2014]. Joy. J., 2002. Biography of a Medal: People and the things they value. In: C.M. Beck, W.G. Johnson and J. Schofield, eds. 2002. Mat{\'e}riel Culture: The archaeology of twentieth-century conflict. London: Routledge. pp. 132–42. K{\"u}chler, S., 2002. Malanggan: Art, memory and sacrifice. Oxford: Berg. McHugh, C.J., 2012a. Kith and Kin: New glass and ceramics stage 2 – the ‘Crinson Jug’, Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums blog, [blog] 9 February. Available at: <http://www.twmuseums.org.uk/engage/blog/kith-and-kin-new-glass-and-ceramics-stage-2-the-{\%}E2{\%}80{\%}98crinson-jug{\%}E2{\%}80{\%}99/> [Accessed 11 July 2014]. McHugh, C.J., 2012b. What’s Your Story? Discovering family history – the Milburn Jug. Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums blog, [blog] 19 July. Available at: <http://www.twmuseums.org.uk/engage/blog/whats-your-story-discovering-family-history-the-milburn-jug/> [Accessed 11 July 2014]. McHugh, C.J., 2013. Towards a Sunderland Pottery for the Twenty-First Century: Materializing multiple dialogues in museum display through creative ceramics. Journal of Museum Ethnography, 26, pp. 71–88. McHugh, C.J., 2015. Recontextualizing the George Brown Collection through creative ceramics. Journal of Museum Ethnography, 28. McLeod, M., 1985. Paolozzi and Identity. In: E. Paolozzi. Lost Magic Kingdoms and Six Paper Moons from Nahuatl: An exhibition at the Museum of Mankind. London: British Museum Press. pp. 15–60. Nora, P., 1989. Between Memory and History: Les lieux de m{\'e}moire. Translated by M. Roudebush, Representations, 26, pp. 7–24. Olivier, L., 2001. The Archaeology of the Contemporary Past. In: V. Buchli and G. Lucas, eds. 2001. Archaeologies of the Contemporary Past. London: Routledge. pp. 175–88. Olsen, B., 2010. In Defense of Things: Archaeology and the ontology of objects. Plymouth: AltaMira Press. Pennell, S., 2010. ‘For a crack or flaw despis’d’: Thinking about ceramic durability and the ‘everyday’ in late seventeenth- and early eighteenth-century England. In: T. Hamling and C. Richardson, eds. 2010. Everyday Objects. Farnham: Ashgate. pp. 27–40. Pollard, J., 2004. The Art of Decay and the Transformation of Substance. In: C. Renfrew, C. Gosden, and E. DeMarrais, eds. 2004. Substance, Memory, Display: Archaeology and art. Cambridge: McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research, pp. 47–62. Scott, A., 1852. Declaration showing non-receipt of parochial assistance. [copy of letter] TWCMS: 2011.1044. Sunderland: Sunderland Museum & Winter Gardens. Scott, A., 1859. Indenture of apprenticeship for Mark Crinson. [indenture] TWCMS: 2011.2387. Sunderland: Sunderland Museum & Winter Gardens. Stair, J., 2014. From Temple to Cathedral: An exhibition on tour. In: University of Westminster, Ceramics in the Expanded Field Conference. London, UK, 19 July 2014. Turkle, S., 2007. Evocative Objects: Things we think with. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Renfrew, C., 2003. Figuring It Out: The parallel visions of artists and archaeologists. London: Thames and Hudson.",
    year = "2016",
    month = "7",
    day = "8",
    language = "English",
    isbn = "978-1472470379",
    pages = "121--131",
    editor = "Christie Brown and Julian Stair and Clare Twomey",
    booktitle = "Contemporary Clay and Museum Culture",

    }

    McHugh, C 2016, McHugh, C. J. 2016. ‘The Crinson Jug from clay to the grave (and beyond): exploring the ceramic object as a gathering point’. in C Brown, J Stair & C Twomey (eds), Contemporary Clay and Museum Culture. London, pp. 121-131.

    McHugh, C. J. 2016. ‘The Crinson Jug from clay to the grave (and beyond): exploring the ceramic object as a gathering point’. / McHugh, Christopher.

    Contemporary Clay and Museum Culture. ed. / Christie Brown; Julian Stair; Clare Twomey. London, 2016. p. 121-131.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    TY - CHAP

    T1 - McHugh, C. J. 2016. ‘The Crinson Jug from clay to the grave (and beyond): exploring the ceramic object as a gathering point’

    AU - McHugh, Christopher

    N1 - Reference text: Adams, J., 2014. Making the Past Present: Paul Montague in New Caledonia. In: Corpus Christi College, University of Cambridge, Pacific Presences: Oceanic art and European museums. [conference] Cambridge, UK, 24 March 2014. Adamson, G., 2010. Introduction to M. Heidegger’s ‘The Thing’, 1971. In: G. Adamson, ed. 2010, The Craft Reader. Oxford: Berg. pp. 404–408. Bleecker, J., 2006. Why Things Matter: A manifesto for networked objects – cohabiting with pigeons, arphids, and AIBOs in the internet of things. In: F. Candlin and R. Guins, eds. 2009. The Object Reader. London: Routledge. pp. 165–74. Brown, C., 2014. Venturing Beyond the Field of Vision. In: University of Westminster, Ceramics in the Expanded Field Conference. London, UK, 18 July 2014. Brown, G.R., 2012. Interaction, Intervention and the Will to Preserve, [online] Available at: <http://www.ceramics-in-the-expanded-field.com/essays/glen-r-brown-phd-usa> [Accessed 2 July 2014]. Chua, L. and Elliott, M. eds, 2013. Distributed Objects: Meaning and mattering after Alfred Gell. Oxford: Bergahn. Connerton, P., 2009. How Modernity Forgets. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Davison, N., 2013. Rivers of Blood: The dead pigs rotting in China’s water supply. The Guardian [online] 29 March. Available at: <http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/mar/29/dead-pigs-china-water-supply> [Accessed 31 October 2013]. Dudley, S., 2010. Museum Materialities: Objects, sense and feeling. In: S. Dudley, ed. 2010. Museum Materialities: Objects, engagements, interpretations. London: Routledge. pp. 1–17. Gates, T., 2014. Five Brick Stories. In: University of Westminster, Ceramics in the Expanded Field Conference. London, UK, 17 July 2014. Gauntlett, D., 2011. Making is Connecting: The social meaning of creativity, from DIY and knitting to YouTube and Web 2.0. Cambridge: Polity Press. Gell, A., 1998. Art and Agency: An anthropological theory. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Gosden, C., 2004a. Making and Display: Our aesthetic appreciation of things and objects. In: C. Renfrew, C. Godsen and E. DeMarrais, eds. 2004. Substance, Memory and Display: Archaeology and art, Cambridge: McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research. pp. 35–45. Gosden, C., 2004b. Aesthetics, Intelligence and Emotions: Implications for archaeology. In: E. DeMarrais, C. Gosden, and C. Renfrew, eds. 2004. Rethinking Materiality: the engagement of mind with the material world. Cambridge: McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research. pp. 33–40. Heidegger, M., 1971. Poetry, Language, Thought, Translated by A. Hofstadter. New York: Harper & Row, Publishers, Inc. Hodder, I., 2012. Entangled: An archaeology of the relationships between humans and things. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell. Holmes, A., 2012. Anne Holmes’ Family History: My connection to the Crinson family of potters, What’s Your Story? Discovering family history. [online] Available at <http://www.whatsyourstory.org.uk/page_id__182_path__0p3p.aspx> [Accessed 10 July 2014]. Holtorf, C., 2002. Notes on the Life History of a Pot Sherd. Journal of Material Culture, 7(1), pp. 49–71. Holtorf, C., 2004. ‘Incavation – Excavation – Exhibition’. In: N. Brodie and C. Hills, eds. 2004. Material Engagements: Studies in honour of Colin Renfrew. Cambridge: McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research. pp. 45–53. Hyde, S., 2012. Milburn Family History: My connection to William Milburn, 1771–1849, Master Potter of Scott’s Pottery Sunderland. What’s Your Story: Discovering family history. [online] Available at: <http://www.whatsyourstory.org.uk/page_id__177_path__0p3p.aspx#return> [Accessed 10 July 2014]. Joy. J., 2002. Biography of a Medal: People and the things they value. In: C.M. Beck, W.G. Johnson and J. Schofield, eds. 2002. Matériel Culture: The archaeology of twentieth-century conflict. London: Routledge. pp. 132–42. Küchler, S., 2002. Malanggan: Art, memory and sacrifice. Oxford: Berg. McHugh, C.J., 2012a. Kith and Kin: New glass and ceramics stage 2 – the ‘Crinson Jug’, Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums blog, [blog] 9 February. Available at: <http://www.twmuseums.org.uk/engage/blog/kith-and-kin-new-glass-and-ceramics-stage-2-the-%E2%80%98crinson-jug%E2%80%99/> [Accessed 11 July 2014]. McHugh, C.J., 2012b. What’s Your Story? Discovering family history – the Milburn Jug. Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums blog, [blog] 19 July. Available at: <http://www.twmuseums.org.uk/engage/blog/whats-your-story-discovering-family-history-the-milburn-jug/> [Accessed 11 July 2014]. McHugh, C.J., 2013. Towards a Sunderland Pottery for the Twenty-First Century: Materializing multiple dialogues in museum display through creative ceramics. Journal of Museum Ethnography, 26, pp. 71–88. McHugh, C.J., 2015. Recontextualizing the George Brown Collection through creative ceramics. Journal of Museum Ethnography, 28. McLeod, M., 1985. Paolozzi and Identity. In: E. Paolozzi. Lost Magic Kingdoms and Six Paper Moons from Nahuatl: An exhibition at the Museum of Mankind. London: British Museum Press. pp. 15–60. Nora, P., 1989. Between Memory and History: Les lieux de mémoire. Translated by M. Roudebush, Representations, 26, pp. 7–24. Olivier, L., 2001. The Archaeology of the Contemporary Past. In: V. Buchli and G. Lucas, eds. 2001. Archaeologies of the Contemporary Past. London: Routledge. pp. 175–88. Olsen, B., 2010. In Defense of Things: Archaeology and the ontology of objects. Plymouth: AltaMira Press. Pennell, S., 2010. ‘For a crack or flaw despis’d’: Thinking about ceramic durability and the ‘everyday’ in late seventeenth- and early eighteenth-century England. In: T. Hamling and C. Richardson, eds. 2010. Everyday Objects. Farnham: Ashgate. pp. 27–40. Pollard, J., 2004. The Art of Decay and the Transformation of Substance. In: C. Renfrew, C. Gosden, and E. DeMarrais, eds. 2004. Substance, Memory, Display: Archaeology and art. Cambridge: McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research, pp. 47–62. Scott, A., 1852. Declaration showing non-receipt of parochial assistance. [copy of letter] TWCMS: 2011.1044. Sunderland: Sunderland Museum & Winter Gardens. Scott, A., 1859. Indenture of apprenticeship for Mark Crinson. [indenture] TWCMS: 2011.2387. Sunderland: Sunderland Museum & Winter Gardens. Stair, J., 2014. From Temple to Cathedral: An exhibition on tour. In: University of Westminster, Ceramics in the Expanded Field Conference. London, UK, 19 July 2014. Turkle, S., 2007. Evocative Objects: Things we think with. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Renfrew, C., 2003. Figuring It Out: The parallel visions of artists and archaeologists. London: Thames and Hudson.

    PY - 2016/7/8

    Y1 - 2016/7/8

    N2 - This is an imagined account of what might have happened to my artworks, Crinson Jug (2012) and associated pieces, after they were lost at an art fair in Shanghai in March 2013. Have they already entered the archaeological record, perhaps on a landfill site somewhere in Shanghai, or will they be found and kept for posterity by a loving owner? Enquiries have been to no avail and, as the fate of these items remains unknown, a story must suffice. In this essay, I want to trace the ‘life history’ of the jug from its beginning as porcelain clay to its last known whereabouts. Although it has been removed from currency, in discussing the jug’s pre-loss career, I will show how it became animated and activated through a process of making, display and engagement with the community. While monuments are often problematised as ‘crystallised’ sites of forgetting (Nora, 1989; Connerton, 2009), it is argued here that, like the jug, ceramic objects have the potential to form dynamic loci of social creativity and remembrance. This incident is worthy of discussion as it demonstrates how such objects, invested with the toil of human endeavour and possessing the potential to affect (Dudley, 2010) and evoke (Turkle, 2007), can become catalysts in the mediation of complex human-object relationships.

    AB - This is an imagined account of what might have happened to my artworks, Crinson Jug (2012) and associated pieces, after they were lost at an art fair in Shanghai in March 2013. Have they already entered the archaeological record, perhaps on a landfill site somewhere in Shanghai, or will they be found and kept for posterity by a loving owner? Enquiries have been to no avail and, as the fate of these items remains unknown, a story must suffice. In this essay, I want to trace the ‘life history’ of the jug from its beginning as porcelain clay to its last known whereabouts. Although it has been removed from currency, in discussing the jug’s pre-loss career, I will show how it became animated and activated through a process of making, display and engagement with the community. While monuments are often problematised as ‘crystallised’ sites of forgetting (Nora, 1989; Connerton, 2009), it is argued here that, like the jug, ceramic objects have the potential to form dynamic loci of social creativity and remembrance. This incident is worthy of discussion as it demonstrates how such objects, invested with the toil of human endeavour and possessing the potential to affect (Dudley, 2010) and evoke (Turkle, 2007), can become catalysts in the mediation of complex human-object relationships.

    KW - ceramics

    KW - sunderland

    KW - pottery

    KW - engagement

    KW - archaeology

    M3 - Chapter

    SN - 978-1472470379

    SP - 121

    EP - 131

    BT - Contemporary Clay and Museum Culture

    A2 - Brown, Christie

    A2 - Stair, Julian

    A2 - Twomey, Clare

    CY - London

    ER -

    McHugh C. McHugh, C. J. 2016. ‘The Crinson Jug from clay to the grave (and beyond): exploring the ceramic object as a gathering point’. In Brown C, Stair J, Twomey C, editors, Contemporary Clay and Museum Culture. London. 2016. p. 121-131