Mathematical modeling of cardiac function to evaluate clinical cases in adults and children

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Abstract

Time-varying elastance models can simulate only the pressure and volume signals in the heart chambers while the diagnosis of clinical cases and evaluation of different treatment techniques require more information. In this study, an extended model utilizing the geometric dimensions of the heart chambers was developed to describe the cardiac function. The new cardiac model was evaluated by simulating a healthy and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) condition for adults and children. The left ventricular ejection fraction, end-diastolic volume, end-diastolic diameter and diastolic sphericity index were 53.60%, 125 mL, 5.08 cm and 1.82 in the healthy adult cardiovascular system model and 23.70%, 173 mL, 6.60 cm and 1.40 in the DCM adult cardiovascular system model. In the healthy child cardiovascular system model, the left ventricular ejection fraction, end-diastolic volume, end-diastolic diameter and diastolic sphericity index were 59.70%, 92 mL, 4.10 cm and 2.26 respectively and 30.70%, 125 mL, 4.94 cm and 1.87 in the DCM child cardiovascular system model. The developed cardiovascular system model simulates the hemodynamic variables and clinical diagnostic indicators within the physiological range for healthy and DCM conditions proving the feasibility of this new model to evaluate clinical cases in adults and children.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0224663
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume14
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished (in print/issue) - 31 Oct 2019

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2019 Selim Bozkurt. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

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