Mapping Interfacial Stress Distributions to Digital Surface Micro-topography

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The ability to characterise highway surfacing textures is essential to better understanding their performance. Traditional volumetric methods such as sand patch produce data based on estimation of a single geometry and offer little insight to early life deformations of bitumen coatings, changes in aggregate shape or longer term performance of the asphalt. Durability of an asphalt surfacing is a function of its ability to withstand static and dynamic contact stresses applied during its life. This paper reports the initial findings of a study into the use of stress mapping based on digital models of real surfaces. These are manipulated using ArcGIS to form a spatial framework for analysing surface textures. Initial results suggest that this methodology offers improved understanding of tyre / surface interaction. This approach has potentially wide ranging application in understanding the mechanics of in-situ wear and the design of more durable asphalt surfacing materials.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationUnknown Host Publication
Number of pages12
Publication statusPublished - May 2011
Event3rd International Surface Friction Conference, Safer Road Surfaces – Saving Lives - Gold Coast, Australia
Duration: 1 May 2011 → …

Conference

Conference3rd International Surface Friction Conference, Safer Road Surfaces – Saving Lives
Period1/05/11 → …

Fingerprint

Hard facing
Asphalt
Topography
Stress concentration
Textures
Tires
Mechanics
Durability
Sand
Wear of materials
Coatings
Geometry

Cite this

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title = "Mapping Interfacial Stress Distributions to Digital Surface Micro-topography",
abstract = "The ability to characterise highway surfacing textures is essential to better understanding their performance. Traditional volumetric methods such as sand patch produce data based on estimation of a single geometry and offer little insight to early life deformations of bitumen coatings, changes in aggregate shape or longer term performance of the asphalt. Durability of an asphalt surfacing is a function of its ability to withstand static and dynamic contact stresses applied during its life. This paper reports the initial findings of a study into the use of stress mapping based on digital models of real surfaces. These are manipulated using ArcGIS to form a spatial framework for analysing surface textures. Initial results suggest that this methodology offers improved understanding of tyre / surface interaction. This approach has potentially wide ranging application in understanding the mechanics of in-situ wear and the design of more durable asphalt surfacing materials.",
author = "Phillip Millar and David Woodward and Shaun Friel",
year = "2011",
month = "5",
language = "English",
booktitle = "Unknown Host Publication",

}

Millar, P, Woodward, D & Friel, S 2011, Mapping Interfacial Stress Distributions to Digital Surface Micro-topography. in Unknown Host Publication. 3rd International Surface Friction Conference, Safer Road Surfaces – Saving Lives, 1/05/11.

Mapping Interfacial Stress Distributions to Digital Surface Micro-topography. / Millar, Phillip; Woodward, David; Friel, Shaun.

Unknown Host Publication. 2011.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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AU - Woodward, David

AU - Friel, Shaun

PY - 2011/5

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N2 - The ability to characterise highway surfacing textures is essential to better understanding their performance. Traditional volumetric methods such as sand patch produce data based on estimation of a single geometry and offer little insight to early life deformations of bitumen coatings, changes in aggregate shape or longer term performance of the asphalt. Durability of an asphalt surfacing is a function of its ability to withstand static and dynamic contact stresses applied during its life. This paper reports the initial findings of a study into the use of stress mapping based on digital models of real surfaces. These are manipulated using ArcGIS to form a spatial framework for analysing surface textures. Initial results suggest that this methodology offers improved understanding of tyre / surface interaction. This approach has potentially wide ranging application in understanding the mechanics of in-situ wear and the design of more durable asphalt surfacing materials.

AB - The ability to characterise highway surfacing textures is essential to better understanding their performance. Traditional volumetric methods such as sand patch produce data based on estimation of a single geometry and offer little insight to early life deformations of bitumen coatings, changes in aggregate shape or longer term performance of the asphalt. Durability of an asphalt surfacing is a function of its ability to withstand static and dynamic contact stresses applied during its life. This paper reports the initial findings of a study into the use of stress mapping based on digital models of real surfaces. These are manipulated using ArcGIS to form a spatial framework for analysing surface textures. Initial results suggest that this methodology offers improved understanding of tyre / surface interaction. This approach has potentially wide ranging application in understanding the mechanics of in-situ wear and the design of more durable asphalt surfacing materials.

M3 - Conference contribution

BT - Unknown Host Publication

ER -