“Man in the driving seat”: A grounded theory study of the psychosocial experiences of Black African and Black Caribbean men treated for prostate cancer and their partners

Olufikayo Bamidele, Helen McGarvey, Briege Lagan, Kader Parahoo, Frank Chinegwundoh, Eilis McCaughan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective
Evidence suggests that treatment side‐effects of prostate cancer (CaP) substantially affect the psychosocial well‐being of affected men and their partners. However, this phenomenon is poorly understood among high risk (1 in 4) Black African (BA)/Black Caribbean (BC) men and their partners, as they are currently under‐represented in global research on CaP survivorship. This study explored the psychosocial experiences of BA/BC men with CaP and their partners in the United Kingdom as they lived through the side effects of CaP treatment within their own sociocultural and marital contexts.

Methods
Using constructivist grounded theory methodology, interviews and focus groups were conducted with eligible men (n = 25), partners (n = 11), and health care professionals (HCPs) (n = 11) recruited in England. Data were iteratively analysed using constant comparison following the key stages of initial, focused, and theoretical coding until saturation was achieved.

Results
Data analysis culminated in the development of a substantive theory “man in the driving seat,” which describes the experiences of BA/BC men with CaP and their partners within their context. Culturally informed gender roles and identities influenced how men and partners responded and coped with the side effects of CaP treatment. There was a hierarchy of power within the BA/BC relationship, in which men were dominantly positioned as leaders, whilst partners mostly operated from a supportive but “accepting” position.

Conclusion
Inclusive and culturally sensitive individual and couple‐focused psychosocial support, which is devoid of stereotyping and recognises the experiences of both BA/BC men and their partners is recommended.
LanguageEnglish
Pages1712-1720
Number of pages9
JournalPsycho-oncology
Volume28
Issue number8
Early online date19 Jun 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2019

Fingerprint

Prostatic Neoplasms
Grounded Theory
Stereotyping
Focus Groups
England
Therapeutics
Survival Rate
Interviews
Delivery of Health Care
Research

Keywords

  • Black African
  • Black Caribbean
  • Experiences
  • Grounded theory
  • Men
  • Partners
  • Prostate cancer
  • Oncology
  • Psychosocial
  • grounded theory
  • experiences
  • oncology
  • prostate cancer
  • partners
  • men
  • psychosocial

Cite this

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title = "“Man in the driving seat”: A grounded theory study of the psychosocial experiences of Black African and Black Caribbean men treated for prostate cancer and their partners",
abstract = "ObjectiveEvidence suggests that treatment side‐effects of prostate cancer (CaP) substantially affect the psychosocial well‐being of affected men and their partners. However, this phenomenon is poorly understood among high risk (1 in 4) Black African (BA)/Black Caribbean (BC) men and their partners, as they are currently under‐represented in global research on CaP survivorship. This study explored the psychosocial experiences of BA/BC men with CaP and their partners in the United Kingdom as they lived through the side effects of CaP treatment within their own sociocultural and marital contexts.MethodsUsing constructivist grounded theory methodology, interviews and focus groups were conducted with eligible men (n = 25), partners (n = 11), and health care professionals (HCPs) (n = 11) recruited in England. Data were iteratively analysed using constant comparison following the key stages of initial, focused, and theoretical coding until saturation was achieved.ResultsData analysis culminated in the development of a substantive theory “man in the driving seat,” which describes the experiences of BA/BC men with CaP and their partners within their context. Culturally informed gender roles and identities influenced how men and partners responded and coped with the side effects of CaP treatment. There was a hierarchy of power within the BA/BC relationship, in which men were dominantly positioned as leaders, whilst partners mostly operated from a supportive but “accepting” position.ConclusionInclusive and culturally sensitive individual and couple‐focused psychosocial support, which is devoid of stereotyping and recognises the experiences of both BA/BC men and their partners is recommended.",
keywords = "Black African, Black Caribbean, Experiences, Grounded theory, Men, Partners, Prostate cancer, Oncology, Psychosocial, grounded theory, experiences, oncology, prostate cancer, partners, men, psychosocial",
author = "Olufikayo Bamidele and Helen McGarvey and Briege Lagan and Kader Parahoo and Frank Chinegwundoh and Eilis McCaughan",
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N2 - ObjectiveEvidence suggests that treatment side‐effects of prostate cancer (CaP) substantially affect the psychosocial well‐being of affected men and their partners. However, this phenomenon is poorly understood among high risk (1 in 4) Black African (BA)/Black Caribbean (BC) men and their partners, as they are currently under‐represented in global research on CaP survivorship. This study explored the psychosocial experiences of BA/BC men with CaP and their partners in the United Kingdom as they lived through the side effects of CaP treatment within their own sociocultural and marital contexts.MethodsUsing constructivist grounded theory methodology, interviews and focus groups were conducted with eligible men (n = 25), partners (n = 11), and health care professionals (HCPs) (n = 11) recruited in England. Data were iteratively analysed using constant comparison following the key stages of initial, focused, and theoretical coding until saturation was achieved.ResultsData analysis culminated in the development of a substantive theory “man in the driving seat,” which describes the experiences of BA/BC men with CaP and their partners within their context. Culturally informed gender roles and identities influenced how men and partners responded and coped with the side effects of CaP treatment. There was a hierarchy of power within the BA/BC relationship, in which men were dominantly positioned as leaders, whilst partners mostly operated from a supportive but “accepting” position.ConclusionInclusive and culturally sensitive individual and couple‐focused psychosocial support, which is devoid of stereotyping and recognises the experiences of both BA/BC men and their partners is recommended.

AB - ObjectiveEvidence suggests that treatment side‐effects of prostate cancer (CaP) substantially affect the psychosocial well‐being of affected men and their partners. However, this phenomenon is poorly understood among high risk (1 in 4) Black African (BA)/Black Caribbean (BC) men and their partners, as they are currently under‐represented in global research on CaP survivorship. This study explored the psychosocial experiences of BA/BC men with CaP and their partners in the United Kingdom as they lived through the side effects of CaP treatment within their own sociocultural and marital contexts.MethodsUsing constructivist grounded theory methodology, interviews and focus groups were conducted with eligible men (n = 25), partners (n = 11), and health care professionals (HCPs) (n = 11) recruited in England. Data were iteratively analysed using constant comparison following the key stages of initial, focused, and theoretical coding until saturation was achieved.ResultsData analysis culminated in the development of a substantive theory “man in the driving seat,” which describes the experiences of BA/BC men with CaP and their partners within their context. Culturally informed gender roles and identities influenced how men and partners responded and coped with the side effects of CaP treatment. There was a hierarchy of power within the BA/BC relationship, in which men were dominantly positioned as leaders, whilst partners mostly operated from a supportive but “accepting” position.ConclusionInclusive and culturally sensitive individual and couple‐focused psychosocial support, which is devoid of stereotyping and recognises the experiences of both BA/BC men and their partners is recommended.

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