Low back pain in people with a stoma A postal survey

Iseult Wilson, Daniel Paul Kerr, Sheila Lennon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose. To investigate whether low back pain (LBP) is a problem for people with a stoma.Method. Following ethical approval, a postal questionnaire was sent to the Ileostomy Association of Northern Ireland (n¼402).Results. The response rate was 81.6%. Two hundred ninety three (72.8%) were included in the analysis. The participants fell into three groups: those who never had LBP (n=102, 34.8%), those who had LBP but not within the last 6 months (n=26, 8.9%) and those who had LBP within the last 6 months (n¼165, 56.3%). Participants with LBP (n=165)compared the ease with which they could carry out everyday tasks: ‘before’ and ‘since’ surgery. There was a mean increased difficulty of between 1.75 and 2.26 points across all tasks. The Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire scores ranged from 0 to 24 with 50% having a score of 8/24 or higher. Some participants (n=76, 46.1%) believed that the stoma surgery was the reason for their back pain, followed by 27.9% (n=46) blaming weak muscles. Others (53.3%) thought their back pain was worsening. There was a significant rise in the incidence of first episode back pain within a year of surgery.Conclusions. These results suggest that LBP is a problem for people with a stoma.
LanguageEnglish
Pages1937-1942
JournalDISABILITY AND REHABILITATION
Volume31
Issue number23
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

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Low Back Pain
Back Pain
Northern Ireland
Ileostomy
Surveys and Questionnaires
Muscles
Incidence

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Wilson, Iseult ; Kerr, Daniel Paul ; Lennon, Sheila. / Low back pain in people with a stoma A postal survey. In: DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION. 2009 ; Vol. 31, No. 23. pp. 1937-1942.
@article{d5f2ae07972946bc8b9b91d8db38e695,
title = "Low back pain in people with a stoma A postal survey",
abstract = "Purpose. To investigate whether low back pain (LBP) is a problem for people with a stoma.Method. Following ethical approval, a postal questionnaire was sent to the Ileostomy Association of Northern Ireland (n¼402).Results. The response rate was 81.6{\%}. Two hundred ninety three (72.8{\%}) were included in the analysis. The participants fell into three groups: those who never had LBP (n=102, 34.8{\%}), those who had LBP but not within the last 6 months (n=26, 8.9{\%}) and those who had LBP within the last 6 months (n¼165, 56.3{\%}). Participants with LBP (n=165)compared the ease with which they could carry out everyday tasks: ‘before’ and ‘since’ surgery. There was a mean increased difficulty of between 1.75 and 2.26 points across all tasks. The Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire scores ranged from 0 to 24 with 50{\%} having a score of 8/24 or higher. Some participants (n=76, 46.1{\%}) believed that the stoma surgery was the reason for their back pain, followed by 27.9{\%} (n=46) blaming weak muscles. Others (53.3{\%}) thought their back pain was worsening. There was a significant rise in the incidence of first episode back pain within a year of surgery.Conclusions. These results suggest that LBP is a problem for people with a stoma.",
author = "Iseult Wilson and Kerr, {Daniel Paul} and Sheila Lennon",
note = "Reference text: 1. Martini FH, Timmons MJ, Tallitsch RB. Human anatomy,5th ed. California: Pearson Education Inc.; 2006. p 272, p275. 2. Richardson CA, Snijders CJ, Hides JA, Damen L, Pas MS,Storm J. The relation between the transverses abdominis muscles, sacroiliac joint mechanics, and low back pain. Spine 2002;15:27:399–405. 3. Kibler WB, Press J, Sciascia A. The role of core stability in athletic function. Sports Med 2006;36:189–198. 4. Kelsey JL, Golden AL. Occupational and workplace factors associated with low back pain. Occup Med 1988;3:7–16. 5. Waddell G. The back pain revolution, Chapter 1. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone; 2004. 6. Hodges PW, Richardson CA. Inefficient muscular stabilization of the lumbar spine associated with low back pain. Spine 1996;21:2640–2650. 7. Richardson CA, Jull G, Hodges P, Hides J. Therapeutic exercise for spinal segmental stabilization in low back pain. London: Churchill Livingstone; 1999. 8. Wilson IM, Kerr DP, Lennon S. Low back pain in people with a stoma: patients’ views. J Wound Ostomy Continence Nurs 2007;34:515–520. 9. Panjabi M. The stabilizing system of the spine: part I: function, dysfunction, adaptation and enhancement. J Spinal Disord 1992;5:383–389. 10. Panjabi M. The stabilizing system of the spine: part II: neutral zone and instability hypothesis. J Spinal Disord 1992;5:390– 397. 11. Liddle SD, Baxter GD, Gracey JH. Exercise and chronic low back pain: what works? Pain 2004;107:176–190. 12. Hayden JA, van Tulder MW, Malmivaara AV, Koes BW. Meta-analysis: exercise therapy for non-specific low back pain. Ann Intern Med 2005;142:765–775. 13. Wilson IM, Kerr DP, Lennon S. Low back pain in people with a stoma: focus group. 2005. Unpublished work. 14. Webster BS, Courtney TK, Huang Y-H, Matz S, Christiani DC. Survey of acute low back pain management by specialty group and practice experience. J Occup Environ Med 2006;48:723–732. 15. Fullen BM, Maher T, Bury G, Tynan A, Daly LE, Hurley DA. Adherence of Irish general practitioners to European guidelines for acute back pain: a prospective pilot study. Eur J Pain 2007;11:614–623. 16. Hestbaek L, Leboeuf-Yde C, Manniche C. Is low back pain part of a general health pattern, or is it a separate and distinctive entity? A critical literature review of comorbidity with low back pain. JManipulative Physiol Ther 2003;26:243– 252. 17. Hestbaek L, Leboeuf-Yde C, Kyvik KO, Vach W, Russell MB, Skadhauge L, Svendsen A, Manniche C. Comorbidity with low back pain. A cross-sectional population-based survey of 12 to 22 year olds. Spine 2004;29:1483–1491.",
year = "2009",
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Low back pain in people with a stoma A postal survey. / Wilson, Iseult; Kerr, Daniel Paul; Lennon, Sheila.

In: DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION, Vol. 31, No. 23, 2009, p. 1937-1942.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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PY - 2009

Y1 - 2009

N2 - Purpose. To investigate whether low back pain (LBP) is a problem for people with a stoma.Method. Following ethical approval, a postal questionnaire was sent to the Ileostomy Association of Northern Ireland (n¼402).Results. The response rate was 81.6%. Two hundred ninety three (72.8%) were included in the analysis. The participants fell into three groups: those who never had LBP (n=102, 34.8%), those who had LBP but not within the last 6 months (n=26, 8.9%) and those who had LBP within the last 6 months (n¼165, 56.3%). Participants with LBP (n=165)compared the ease with which they could carry out everyday tasks: ‘before’ and ‘since’ surgery. There was a mean increased difficulty of between 1.75 and 2.26 points across all tasks. The Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire scores ranged from 0 to 24 with 50% having a score of 8/24 or higher. Some participants (n=76, 46.1%) believed that the stoma surgery was the reason for their back pain, followed by 27.9% (n=46) blaming weak muscles. Others (53.3%) thought their back pain was worsening. There was a significant rise in the incidence of first episode back pain within a year of surgery.Conclusions. These results suggest that LBP is a problem for people with a stoma.

AB - Purpose. To investigate whether low back pain (LBP) is a problem for people with a stoma.Method. Following ethical approval, a postal questionnaire was sent to the Ileostomy Association of Northern Ireland (n¼402).Results. The response rate was 81.6%. Two hundred ninety three (72.8%) were included in the analysis. The participants fell into three groups: those who never had LBP (n=102, 34.8%), those who had LBP but not within the last 6 months (n=26, 8.9%) and those who had LBP within the last 6 months (n¼165, 56.3%). Participants with LBP (n=165)compared the ease with which they could carry out everyday tasks: ‘before’ and ‘since’ surgery. There was a mean increased difficulty of between 1.75 and 2.26 points across all tasks. The Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire scores ranged from 0 to 24 with 50% having a score of 8/24 or higher. Some participants (n=76, 46.1%) believed that the stoma surgery was the reason for their back pain, followed by 27.9% (n=46) blaming weak muscles. Others (53.3%) thought their back pain was worsening. There was a significant rise in the incidence of first episode back pain within a year of surgery.Conclusions. These results suggest that LBP is a problem for people with a stoma.

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DO - 10.3109/09638280902850238

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SN - 0963-8288

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