Looking Through the Lens at Endings:Service User, Student, Carer and Practice Educator Perspectives on Endings within Social Work Training

Siobhan Wylie, Denise Mac Dermott

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

This chapter will look at the importance of endings within social work professional training, with a focus on the student experience when on placement, as these endings often occur organically as student placements last between 85 and 100 days (Northern Ireland Social Care Council 2009).We learn best through experiential learning (Kolb 1984) so we have included narratives that highlight the very real importance of endings; this will be underpinned with relevant research. There is limited literature available in relation to endings in social work supervision (Gould 1977; Ruch, Turney and Ward 2010; Wall 1994) yet as a practice educator the exploration of endings is central to modelling good social work practice.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationDoing Relationship Based Social Work : A Practical Guide to Building Relationships and Enabling Change
EditorsMary McColgan, Cheryl McMullin
Place of PublicationLondon
Pages177-192
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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social work
educator
student
supervision
narrative
learning
experience
literature

Keywords

  • Relationship based practice
  • endings in social work
  • students
  • service users and carers.

Cite this

Wylie, S., & Mac Dermott, D. (2017). Looking Through the Lens at Endings:Service User, Student, Carer and Practice Educator Perspectives on Endings within Social Work Training. In M. McColgan, & C. McMullin (Eds.), Doing Relationship Based Social Work : A Practical Guide to Building Relationships and Enabling Change (pp. 177-192). London.
Wylie, Siobhan ; Mac Dermott, Denise. / Looking Through the Lens at Endings:Service User, Student, Carer and Practice Educator Perspectives on Endings within Social Work Training. Doing Relationship Based Social Work : A Practical Guide to Building Relationships and Enabling Change. editor / Mary McColgan ; Cheryl McMullin. London, 2017. pp. 177-192
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abstract = "This chapter will look at the importance of endings within social work professional training, with a focus on the student experience when on placement, as these endings often occur organically as student placements last between 85 and 100 days (Northern Ireland Social Care Council 2009).We learn best through experiential learning (Kolb 1984) so we have included narratives that highlight the very real importance of endings; this will be underpinned with relevant research. There is limited literature available in relation to endings in social work supervision (Gould 1977; Ruch, Turney and Ward 2010; Wall 1994) yet as a practice educator the exploration of endings is central to modelling good social work practice.",
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note = "Reference text: Clow, C. (2001) ‘Managing Endings in Practice Teaching.’ In H. Lawson (ed.) Practice Teaching – Changing Social Work. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers. Currer’ C. (2008) Loss and Social Work. Exeter: Learning Matters. Ford, K. and Jones, A. (1987) Student Supervision: Practical Social Work Series. London: Macmillan Education. Gould, R. (1977) ‘Students’ experience with the termination phase of individual treatment.’ Smith College Studies in Social Work 48, 235–269. Howe, D. (2009) A Brief Introduction to Social Work Theory. London: Palgrave Macmillan. Huntley, D. (2008) ‘Relationship-based social work – how do endings impact on the client?’ Practice 14, 2, 59–66. Kolb, D. A. (1984) Experiential Learning: Experience as the Source of Learning and Development. Englewood Cli s, NJ: Prentice Hall. Lombard, D. (2010) ‘How to say goodbye.’ Community Care Magazine, 28 October. MacDermott, D. and Campbell, A. (2015) ‘An examination of student and provider perceptions of voluntary sector social work placements in Northern Ireland.’ Social Work Education 35, 1, 31–49. Northern Ireland Degree in Social Work Degree Partnership (2015) The Regional Practice Learning Handbook. Belfast: NISCC. Northern Ireland Social Care Council (2009) The Standards for Practice Learning for the Degree in Social Work. Belfast: NISCC. Northern Ireland Social Care Council (2011) National Occupational Standards for Social Work. Belfast: NISCC. Ruch, G., Turney, D. and Ward, A. (eds) (2010) Relationship-Based Social Work: Getting to the Heart of Practice. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers. Shulman, L. (2016) The Skills of Helping Individuals, Families, Groups and Communities (8th edn). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth/Thomson Learning. Solomon, R. (2010) ‘Working with Endings in Relationship-Based Practice.’ In G. Ruch, D. Turney and A. Ward (eds) Relationship-Based Social Work: Getting to the Heart of Practice. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers. Thompson, N. (2012) Grief and Its Challenges. London: Palgrave Macmillan. Wall, J. (1994) ‘Teaching termination to trainees through parallel processes in supervision.’ The Clinical Supervisor 12, 2, 27–37. Wilson, K., Ruch, G., Lymbery, M. and Cooper, A. (2008) Social Work: An Introduction to Contemporary Practice. London: Pearson Education. Winnicott, D. W. (1964) The Child, the Family and the Outside World. London: Penguin",
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Wylie, S & Mac Dermott, D 2017, Looking Through the Lens at Endings:Service User, Student, Carer and Practice Educator Perspectives on Endings within Social Work Training. in M McColgan & C McMullin (eds), Doing Relationship Based Social Work : A Practical Guide to Building Relationships and Enabling Change. London, pp. 177-192.

Looking Through the Lens at Endings:Service User, Student, Carer and Practice Educator Perspectives on Endings within Social Work Training. / Wylie, Siobhan; Mac Dermott, Denise.

Doing Relationship Based Social Work : A Practical Guide to Building Relationships and Enabling Change. ed. / Mary McColgan; Cheryl McMullin. London, 2017. p. 177-192.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Wylie S, Mac Dermott D. Looking Through the Lens at Endings:Service User, Student, Carer and Practice Educator Perspectives on Endings within Social Work Training. In McColgan M, McMullin C, editors, Doing Relationship Based Social Work : A Practical Guide to Building Relationships and Enabling Change. London. 2017. p. 177-192