Long-Term Trajectories of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Veterans: The Role of Social Resources

Karen-Inge Karstoft, Cherie Armour, Ask Elklit, Zahava Solomon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:To (1) identify long-term trajectories of combat-induced posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms over a 20-year period from 1983 to 2002 in veterans with and without combat stress reaction (CSR) and (2) identify social predictors of these trajectories.METHOD:A latent growth mixture modeling analysis on PTSD symptoms was conducted to identify PTSD trajectories and predictors. PTSD was defined according to DSM-III and assessed through the PTSD Inventory. Israeli male veterans with (n = 369) and without (n = 306) CSR were queried at 1, 2, and 20 years after war about combat exposure, military unit support, family environment, and social reintegration.RESULTS:For both study groups, we identified 4 distinct trajectories with varying prevalence across groups: resilience (CSR = 34.4%, non-CSR = 76.5%), recovery (CSR = 36.3%, non-CSR = 10.5%), delayed onset (CSR = 8.4%, non-CSR = 6.9%), and chronicity (CSR = 20.9%, non-CSR = 6.2%). Predictors of trajectories in both groups included perception of war threat (ORs = 1.59-2.47, P values ≤ .30), and negative social reintegration (ORs = 0.24-0.51, P values ≤ .047). Social support was associated with symptomatology only in the CSR group (ORs = 0.40-0.61, P values ≤ .045), while family coherence was predictive of symptomatology in the non-CSR group (OR = 0.76, P = .015) but not in the CSR group.CONCLUSIONS:Findings confirmed heterogeneity of long-term sequelae of combat, revealing 4 trajectories of resilience, recovery, delay, and chronicity in veterans with and without CSR. Symptomatic trajectories were more prevalent for the CSR group, suggesting that acute functional impairment predicts pathological outcomes. Predictors of symptomatic trajectories included perceived threat and social resources at the family, network, and societal levels.
LanguageEnglish
Pagese1163-e1168
JournalJournal of Clinical Psychiatry
Volume74
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Fingerprint

Veterans
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders
Social Environment
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Social Support
Equipment and Supplies
Growth
Warfare

Keywords

  • PTSD
  • Veterans
  • LGMM
  • Social Support

Cite this

Karstoft, Karen-Inge ; Armour, Cherie ; Elklit, Ask ; Solomon, Zahava. / Long-Term Trajectories of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Veterans: The Role of Social Resources. In: Journal of Clinical Psychiatry. 2013 ; Vol. 74, No. 12. pp. e1163-e1168.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVE:To (1) identify long-term trajectories of combat-induced posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms over a 20-year period from 1983 to 2002 in veterans with and without combat stress reaction (CSR) and (2) identify social predictors of these trajectories.METHOD:A latent growth mixture modeling analysis on PTSD symptoms was conducted to identify PTSD trajectories and predictors. PTSD was defined according to DSM-III and assessed through the PTSD Inventory. Israeli male veterans with (n = 369) and without (n = 306) CSR were queried at 1, 2, and 20 years after war about combat exposure, military unit support, family environment, and social reintegration.RESULTS:For both study groups, we identified 4 distinct trajectories with varying prevalence across groups: resilience (CSR = 34.4{\%}, non-CSR = 76.5{\%}), recovery (CSR = 36.3{\%}, non-CSR = 10.5{\%}), delayed onset (CSR = 8.4{\%}, non-CSR = 6.9{\%}), and chronicity (CSR = 20.9{\%}, non-CSR = 6.2{\%}). Predictors of trajectories in both groups included perception of war threat (ORs = 1.59-2.47, P values ≤ .30), and negative social reintegration (ORs = 0.24-0.51, P values ≤ .047). Social support was associated with symptomatology only in the CSR group (ORs = 0.40-0.61, P values ≤ .045), while family coherence was predictive of symptomatology in the non-CSR group (OR = 0.76, P = .015) but not in the CSR group.CONCLUSIONS:Findings confirmed heterogeneity of long-term sequelae of combat, revealing 4 trajectories of resilience, recovery, delay, and chronicity in veterans with and without CSR. Symptomatic trajectories were more prevalent for the CSR group, suggesting that acute functional impairment predicts pathological outcomes. Predictors of symptomatic trajectories included perceived threat and social resources at the family, network, and societal levels.",
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Long-Term Trajectories of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Veterans: The Role of Social Resources. / Karstoft, Karen-Inge; Armour, Cherie; Elklit, Ask; Solomon, Zahava.

In: Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, Vol. 74, No. 12, 2013, p. e1163-e1168.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Long-Term Trajectories of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Veterans: The Role of Social Resources

AU - Karstoft, Karen-Inge

AU - Armour, Cherie

AU - Elklit, Ask

AU - Solomon, Zahava

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - OBJECTIVE:To (1) identify long-term trajectories of combat-induced posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms over a 20-year period from 1983 to 2002 in veterans with and without combat stress reaction (CSR) and (2) identify social predictors of these trajectories.METHOD:A latent growth mixture modeling analysis on PTSD symptoms was conducted to identify PTSD trajectories and predictors. PTSD was defined according to DSM-III and assessed through the PTSD Inventory. Israeli male veterans with (n = 369) and without (n = 306) CSR were queried at 1, 2, and 20 years after war about combat exposure, military unit support, family environment, and social reintegration.RESULTS:For both study groups, we identified 4 distinct trajectories with varying prevalence across groups: resilience (CSR = 34.4%, non-CSR = 76.5%), recovery (CSR = 36.3%, non-CSR = 10.5%), delayed onset (CSR = 8.4%, non-CSR = 6.9%), and chronicity (CSR = 20.9%, non-CSR = 6.2%). Predictors of trajectories in both groups included perception of war threat (ORs = 1.59-2.47, P values ≤ .30), and negative social reintegration (ORs = 0.24-0.51, P values ≤ .047). Social support was associated with symptomatology only in the CSR group (ORs = 0.40-0.61, P values ≤ .045), while family coherence was predictive of symptomatology in the non-CSR group (OR = 0.76, P = .015) but not in the CSR group.CONCLUSIONS:Findings confirmed heterogeneity of long-term sequelae of combat, revealing 4 trajectories of resilience, recovery, delay, and chronicity in veterans with and without CSR. Symptomatic trajectories were more prevalent for the CSR group, suggesting that acute functional impairment predicts pathological outcomes. Predictors of symptomatic trajectories included perceived threat and social resources at the family, network, and societal levels.

AB - OBJECTIVE:To (1) identify long-term trajectories of combat-induced posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms over a 20-year period from 1983 to 2002 in veterans with and without combat stress reaction (CSR) and (2) identify social predictors of these trajectories.METHOD:A latent growth mixture modeling analysis on PTSD symptoms was conducted to identify PTSD trajectories and predictors. PTSD was defined according to DSM-III and assessed through the PTSD Inventory. Israeli male veterans with (n = 369) and without (n = 306) CSR were queried at 1, 2, and 20 years after war about combat exposure, military unit support, family environment, and social reintegration.RESULTS:For both study groups, we identified 4 distinct trajectories with varying prevalence across groups: resilience (CSR = 34.4%, non-CSR = 76.5%), recovery (CSR = 36.3%, non-CSR = 10.5%), delayed onset (CSR = 8.4%, non-CSR = 6.9%), and chronicity (CSR = 20.9%, non-CSR = 6.2%). Predictors of trajectories in both groups included perception of war threat (ORs = 1.59-2.47, P values ≤ .30), and negative social reintegration (ORs = 0.24-0.51, P values ≤ .047). Social support was associated with symptomatology only in the CSR group (ORs = 0.40-0.61, P values ≤ .045), while family coherence was predictive of symptomatology in the non-CSR group (OR = 0.76, P = .015) but not in the CSR group.CONCLUSIONS:Findings confirmed heterogeneity of long-term sequelae of combat, revealing 4 trajectories of resilience, recovery, delay, and chronicity in veterans with and without CSR. Symptomatic trajectories were more prevalent for the CSR group, suggesting that acute functional impairment predicts pathological outcomes. Predictors of symptomatic trajectories included perceived threat and social resources at the family, network, and societal levels.

KW - PTSD

KW - Veterans

KW - LGMM

KW - Social Support

U2 - 10.4088/JCP.13.m08482

DO - 10.4088/JCP.13.m08482

M3 - Article

VL - 74

SP - e1163-e1168

JO - Journal of Clinical Psychiatry

T2 - Journal of Clinical Psychiatry

JF - Journal of Clinical Psychiatry

SN - 0160-6689

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ER -