Local E-Government and Devolution: Electronic Service Delivery in Northern Ireland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There are billions of annual transactions between citizens and government; most of these are between citizens and local government. Both central and local government share the same target for electronic service delivery: 100% of key services online by 2005. In Northern Ireland, however, district councils are being left behind on the e-government agenda. The Northern Ireland Assembly, currently suspended, has no provisions or recommendations for local e-government, although many transactional services of interest to ordinary citizens are provided by local councils. The absence of a strategy for local e-government means that district councils are left to their own devices, and this contrasts with the rest of the UK. A snapshot of local councils is used to assess the extent of provision of electronic service delivery, highlighting examples of innovation, and indicating significant challenges for Northern Ireland local e-government during a period of suspended devolution.
LanguageEnglish
Pages307-319
JournalLocal Government Studies
Volume31
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2005

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devolution
electronic government
decentralization
electronics
citizen
local government
district
online service
transaction
innovation
services

Cite this

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Local E-Government and Devolution: Electronic Service Delivery in Northern Ireland. / Paris, M.

In: Local Government Studies, Vol. 31, No. 3, 06.2005, p. 307-319.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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