Legislative scrutiny, co-ordination and the Social Security Advisory Committee: from system coherence to Scottish devolution

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article examines the parliamentary processes available to scrutinise draft social security regulations in the UK, highlighting the democratic deficit that exists between executive power and parliamentary authority, and reviewing the unique scrutiny function of the UK Social Security Advisory Committee. The article explores the development of devolved social security powers in Northern Ireland and Scotland and the oversight gap that is now emerging between devolved and reserved powers, with the potential for unintended adverse consequences arising for claimants moving between the different systems within the UK. The article considers the oversight options that might be developed to include independent and expert oversight of devolved social security provision in Scotland, focusing on the need to enable system coherence and fairness in the treatment of claimants, regardless of their geographical circumstances.
LanguageEnglish
Pages126-149
JournalJournal of Social Security Law
Volume3
Publication statusPublished - 31 Dec 2016

Fingerprint

social security
decentralization
executive power
fairness
deficit
expert
regulation
coherence

Keywords

  • social security
  • devolution
  • Legislative scrutiny
  • Social Security Advisory Committee
  • Scotland
  • Northern Ireland
  • independent oversight

Cite this

@article{345a451688524382ad9d3042b0addb32,
title = "Legislative scrutiny, co-ordination and the Social Security Advisory Committee: from system coherence to Scottish devolution",
abstract = "This article examines the parliamentary processes available to scrutinise draft social security regulations in the UK, highlighting the democratic deficit that exists between executive power and parliamentary authority, and reviewing the unique scrutiny function of the UK Social Security Advisory Committee. The article explores the development of devolved social security powers in Northern Ireland and Scotland and the oversight gap that is now emerging between devolved and reserved powers, with the potential for unintended adverse consequences arising for claimants moving between the different systems within the UK. The article considers the oversight options that might be developed to include independent and expert oversight of devolved social security provision in Scotland, focusing on the need to enable system coherence and fairness in the treatment of claimants, regardless of their geographical circumstances.",
keywords = "social security, devolution, Legislative scrutiny, Social Security Advisory Committee, Scotland, Northern Ireland, independent oversight",
author = "Grainne McKeever",
note = "Compliant in UIR (see uploaded file '36060 Evidence of compliance in UIR'",
year = "2016",
month = "12",
day = "31",
language = "English",
volume = "3",
pages = "126--149",
journal = "Journal of Social Security Law",
issn = "1354-7747",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Legislative scrutiny, co-ordination and the Social Security Advisory Committee: from system coherence to Scottish devolution

AU - McKeever, Grainne

N1 - Compliant in UIR (see uploaded file '36060 Evidence of compliance in UIR'

PY - 2016/12/31

Y1 - 2016/12/31

N2 - This article examines the parliamentary processes available to scrutinise draft social security regulations in the UK, highlighting the democratic deficit that exists between executive power and parliamentary authority, and reviewing the unique scrutiny function of the UK Social Security Advisory Committee. The article explores the development of devolved social security powers in Northern Ireland and Scotland and the oversight gap that is now emerging between devolved and reserved powers, with the potential for unintended adverse consequences arising for claimants moving between the different systems within the UK. The article considers the oversight options that might be developed to include independent and expert oversight of devolved social security provision in Scotland, focusing on the need to enable system coherence and fairness in the treatment of claimants, regardless of their geographical circumstances.

AB - This article examines the parliamentary processes available to scrutinise draft social security regulations in the UK, highlighting the democratic deficit that exists between executive power and parliamentary authority, and reviewing the unique scrutiny function of the UK Social Security Advisory Committee. The article explores the development of devolved social security powers in Northern Ireland and Scotland and the oversight gap that is now emerging between devolved and reserved powers, with the potential for unintended adverse consequences arising for claimants moving between the different systems within the UK. The article considers the oversight options that might be developed to include independent and expert oversight of devolved social security provision in Scotland, focusing on the need to enable system coherence and fairness in the treatment of claimants, regardless of their geographical circumstances.

KW - social security

KW - devolution

KW - Legislative scrutiny

KW - Social Security Advisory Committee

KW - Scotland

KW - Northern Ireland

KW - independent oversight

M3 - Article

VL - 3

SP - 126

EP - 149

JO - Journal of Social Security Law

T2 - Journal of Social Security Law

JF - Journal of Social Security Law

SN - 1354-7747

ER -