Latent profiles of DSM-5 PTSD symptoms and the “Big Five” personality traits

Ateka A. Contractor, Cherie Armour, M. Tracie Shea, Natalie Mota, Robert H. Pietrzak

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Typologies of DSM-5 PTSD symptoms and personality traits were evaluated in regard to coping styles and treatment preferences using data from 1266 trauma-exposed military veterans of which the majority were male (n = 1097; weighted 89.6%). Latent profile analyses indicated a best-fitting 5-class solution; PTSD asymptomatic and emotionally stable (C1); predominant re-experiencing and avoidance symptoms and less emotionally stable (C2); subsyndromal PTSD (C3); predominant negative alterations in mood/cognitions and combined internalizing–externalizing traits (C4); and high PTSD severity and combined internalizing–externalizing traits (C5). Compared to C5, C1 members were less likely to use self-distraction, denial, and substance use and more likely to use active coping; C2 and C4 members were less likely to use denial and more likely to use behavioral disengagement; C3 members were less likely to use denial and instrumental coping and more likely to use active coping; most classes were less likely to seek mental health treatment. Compared to C1, C2 members were more likely to use self-distraction, substance use, behavioral disengagement and less likely to use active coping; C3 members were more likely to use self-distraction, and substance use, and less likely to use positive reframing, and acceptance; and C4 members were more likely to use denial, substance use, emotional support, and behavioral disengagement, and less likely to use active coping, positive reframing, and acceptance; all classes were more likely to seek mental health treatment. Emotional stability was most distinguishing of the typologies. Other implications are discussed.
LanguageEnglish
Pages10-20
JournalJournal of Anxiety Disorders
Volume37
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders
Personality
Mental Health
Veterans
Cognition
Therapeutics
Denial (Psychology)
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • DSM-5 PTSD
  • Big-five personality dimensions
  • Latent profile analyses
  • Coping
  • Mental health treatment

Cite this

Contractor, Ateka A. ; Armour, Cherie ; Shea, M. Tracie ; Mota, Natalie ; Pietrzak, Robert H. / Latent profiles of DSM-5 PTSD symptoms and the “Big Five” personality traits. In: Journal of Anxiety Disorders. 2016 ; Vol. 37. pp. 10-20.
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Latent profiles of DSM-5 PTSD symptoms and the “Big Five” personality traits. / Contractor, Ateka A.; Armour, Cherie; Shea, M. Tracie; Mota, Natalie; Pietrzak, Robert H.

In: Journal of Anxiety Disorders, Vol. 37, 2016, p. 10-20.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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