Latent Classes of Childhood Poly-victimization and Associations with Suicidal Behavior among Adult Trauma Victims: Moderating Role of Anger

Ruby Charak, Brianna Byllesby, Michelle Roley, Meredith Claycomb, Tory Durham, Jana Ross, Cherie Armour, John Elhai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aims of the present study were first to identify discrete patterns of childhood victimization experiences including crime, child maltreatment, peer/sibling victimization, sexual violence, and witnessing violence among adult trauma victims using latent class analysis; second, to examine the association between class-membership and suicidal behavior, and third to investigate the differential role of dispositional anger on the association between class-membership and suicidal behavior. We hypothesized that those classes with accumulating exposure to different types of childhood victimization (e.g., poly-victimization) would endorse higher suicidal behavior, than the other less severe classes, and those in the most severe class with higher anger trait would have stronger association with suicidal behavior. Respondents were 346 adults (N=346; Mage=35.0years; 55.9% female) who had experienced a lifetime traumatic event. Sixty four percent had experienced poly-victimization (four or more victimization experiences) and 38.8% met the cut-off score for suicidal behavior. Three distinct classes emerged namely, the Least victimization (Class 1), the Predominantly crime and sibling/peer victimization (Class 2), and the Poly-victimization (Class 3) classes. Regression analysis controlling for age and gender indicated that only the main effect of anger was significantly associated with suicidal behavior. The interaction term suggested that those in the Poly-victimization class were higher on suicidal behavior as a result of a stronger association between anger and suicidal behavior in contrast to the association found in Class 2. Clinical implications of findings entail imparting anger management skills to facilitate wellbeing among adult with childhood poly-victimization experiences.
LanguageEnglish
Pages19-28
JournalChild Abuse & Neglect
Volume62
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2016

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anger
victimization
trauma
childhood
class membership
offense
experience
maltreatment
sexual violence
regression analysis
violence
event
gender

Keywords

  • Poly-victimization
  • Childhood victimization
  • Anger
  • Suicidal behavior
  • Latent class analysis
  • Adult trauma victims

Cite this

Charak, R., Byllesby, B., Roley, M., Claycomb, M., Durham, T., Ross, J., ... Elhai, J. (2016). Latent Classes of Childhood Poly-victimization and Associations with Suicidal Behavior among Adult Trauma Victims: Moderating Role of Anger. Child Abuse & Neglect, 62, 19-28.
Charak, Ruby ; Byllesby, Brianna ; Roley, Michelle ; Claycomb, Meredith ; Durham, Tory ; Ross, Jana ; Armour, Cherie ; Elhai, John. / Latent Classes of Childhood Poly-victimization and Associations with Suicidal Behavior among Adult Trauma Victims: Moderating Role of Anger. In: Child Abuse & Neglect. 2016 ; Vol. 62. pp. 19-28.
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Charak, R, Byllesby, B, Roley, M, Claycomb, M, Durham, T, Ross, J, Armour, C & Elhai, J 2016, 'Latent Classes of Childhood Poly-victimization and Associations with Suicidal Behavior among Adult Trauma Victims: Moderating Role of Anger', Child Abuse & Neglect, vol. 62, pp. 19-28.

Latent Classes of Childhood Poly-victimization and Associations with Suicidal Behavior among Adult Trauma Victims: Moderating Role of Anger. / Charak, Ruby; Byllesby, Brianna; Roley, Michelle; Claycomb, Meredith; Durham, Tory; Ross, Jana; Armour, Cherie; Elhai, John.

In: Child Abuse & Neglect, Vol. 62, 12.2016, p. 19-28.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Durham, Tory

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AU - Elhai, John

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