Abiran las Grandes Alamedas? Justicia Memoria y No Repeticion en TIempos Constituyentes

Translated title of the contribution: JUSTICE, MEMORY, NON-REPETITION AND THE CONSTITUTIONAL MOMENT

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The year 2020 will likely go down in history as one of the most sombre and difficult periods of recent world history. It also happens to mark the tenth time that this chapter on truth, justice, reparations and guarantees of non-repetition, the only thematic chapter to appear in the UDP’s Human Rights Report every year since its inception, has been prepared by Cath Collins and the UDP’s dedicated Transitional Justice Observatory, Observatorio. This year has been difficult for everyone, and the Observatorio team is no exception. We therefore extend an even larger vote of thanks than usual to our core team and expert contributors for their generosity in continuing to take part, ad honorem, in this endeavour even in these difficult times. Although it seems at times as though the whole world is presently ‘in transition’, towards an uncertain destination, we continue to in the importance of keeping the justice horizon in view even in the face of these new challenges. If anything, over the decade in which the Observatory has been in operation, we have seen an expansion of the reach and ambition of transitional justice whether as theory or praxis. Transformative schools of thought have opened up the traditional truth and justice agenda, placing structural, economic, ethnic and gender justice at the heart of any serious call for a ‘Never Again’ regarding atrocity crimes. These more radical currents in transitional justice thinking have not made as much headway in Chile as in other parts of the global South. It is nonetheless noticeable how the vocabulary and preoccupations of transitional justice – particularly historical memory - have become much more visible, at least in academic circles, since the Observatory was founded. Few would deny, however, that Chile’s social irruption of October 2019 has been the key detonator of the dawning realisation that today’s injustices are the continuation of yesterday’s, or at least, that the two are intimately connected. The whole experience of the social irruption and its aftermath has left part of the population in a state of euphoria, feeling part once again of a people in motion toward a common objective. Others were left dismayed by the sudden turning upside down of everyday life and everything they held dear. All of us should meanwhile be left sobered by what this episode exposed: myriad lessons as yet apparently unlearned, about the costs of unrestrained use of violence by the authorities.
Translated title of the contributionJUSTICE, MEMORY, NON-REPETITION AND THE CONSTITUTIONAL MOMENT
Original languageSpanish
Title of host publicationInforme Anual Derechos Humanos Chile 2020
Place of PublicationSantiago Chile
PublisherUniversidad Diego Portales
Pages495
Number of pages596
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2020

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