Is there an association between self-reported physical activity and self-rated vision over time? Results from the TILDA study.

Ilona Mc Mullan, B Bunting, Mark Tully, lee smith, Ai Koyanagi

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Abstract

Research suggests that physical activity has many health benefits for an ageing population. Evidence exploring the association between physical activity (PA) and vision is limited. This study uses the measures of self-reported PA (IPAQ) and self-rated vision at three points in time over a six-year period used in the TILDA study, a cohort of community-dwelling older adults (50
7 years or over). A path analysis found that PA was indirectly associated with vision over six years controlling for age, sex, marital status, employment, education, depression (CES-D), self reported general health, CVD (e.g. heart attack), high blood pressure, diabetes, eye disease (e.g. glaucoma, diabetic eye disease, macular degeneration, cataract), and disabilities associated with activities of daily living (ADLs). Further research is needed to fully understand the relationship over time and generalise the findings.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Aging and Physical Activity
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 25 Feb 2020

Keywords

  • vision
  • physical activity

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