Irrational Beliefs in Posttraumatic Stress Responses: A Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy Approach

Philip Hyland, M Shevlin, Gary Adamson, Daniel Boduszek

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The current study aimed to test a key theoretical prediction of rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT) theory by assessing the role of general and trauma-specific irrational beliefs in the prediction of posttraumatic stress responses. A sample (N=313) of trauma-exposed emergency service workers participated in the study. Structural equation modeling results demonstrated that an REBT-based model provided satisfactory model fit and explained 89% of variance in posttraumatic stress symptomatology. Theoretical predictions were supported, with results demonstrating that general-level irrationality indirectly impacted posttraumatic stress responses via a set of trauma-specific irrational beliefs. Results indicate the importance of irrational beliefs in predicting posttraumatic stress responses.
LanguageEnglish
Pages171-188
Number of pages17
JournalJOURNAL OF LOSS & TRAUMA
Volume20
Issue number2
Early online date30 Sep 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2015

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behavior therapy
Behavior Therapy
trauma
Wounds and Injuries
Emergencies
worker

Keywords

  • posttraumatic stress disorder
  • rational emotive behavior therapy
  • structural equation modeling
  • irrational beliefs
  • dysfunctional cognitions

Cite this

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Irrational Beliefs in Posttraumatic Stress Responses: A Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy Approach. / Hyland, Philip; Shevlin, M; Adamson, Gary; Boduszek, Daniel.

In: JOURNAL OF LOSS & TRAUMA, Vol. 20, No. 2, 01.04.2015, p. 171-188.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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