Involving individuals with dementia as co-researchers in analysis of findings from a qualitative study

Mabel Stevenson, Brian J Taylor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Patient and public involvement is widely accepted as good practice in dementia research contributing substantial benefits to research quality. Reports detailing involvement of individuals with dementia as co-researchers, more specifically in analysis of findings are lacking. This paper reports an exercise involving individuals with dementia as co-researchers in a qualitative analysis. Data was from anonymised extracts of interviews with people with dementia who had participated in a multistage study on risk communication in dementia care, relating to concepts and communication of risk. Co-researchers were involved in deriving meaning from the data, identifying and connecting themes. The analysis process is described, reflections on the exercise provided and impact discussed. The session improved overall research quality by enhancing validity of the findings through application of multiple perspectives while also generating sub-themes for exploration in subsequent interviews. Development of guidance for involving individuals with dementia in analysis of research findings is needed.

LanguageEnglish
Pages701-712
Number of pages12
JournalDementia: The International Journal of Social Research and Practice
Volume18
Issue number2
Early online date29 Jan 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2019

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dementia
risk communication
process analysis
interview
best practice
communication

Keywords

  • co-research
  • dementia
  • patient and public involvement
  • user involvement

Cite this

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