Intergroup identity perceptions and their implications for intergroup forgiveness: The Common Ingroup Identity Model and its efficacy in the field.

Nasi Moor, Robert Brown, Laurence Taggart, Ana Fernandez, Sharon Coen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Three studies revisited the application of the Common Ingroup Identity Model (CIIM) to the Northern Irish conflict and shed light on the factors that potentially limit the scope of the CIIM. Study 1 (N = 61) showed that both conflict protagonists unanimously viewed ‘Northern Ireland’ as the most inclusive superordinate category relative to other viable categories. Employing a longitudinal design, Study 2 (N = 67/43) examined the stability of the intergroup identity perceptions that the Northern Irish Protestant and Catholic groups hold in relation to the superordinate category ‘Northern Ireland’. Moreover, Study 2 also provided evidence that the Protestant group engages in ingroup projection (i.e., perceiving a large overlap between their ingroup identity category and the superordinate category). Study 3 (N = 307) successfully replicated previous research revealing that, while the Catholic group’s willingness to forgive the outgroup benefits from identifying with the superordinate category, the Protestants’ willingness to forgive the outgroup does not. Results are discussed in terms of their theoretical and practical implications.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)151-170
JournalIrish journal of Psychology
Volume31
Issue number3-4
Publication statusPublished - 2010

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