Intergroup friendships: Integrated and desegregated schools in northern Ireland

Carol McClenahan, Ed Cairns, S Dunn, V Morgan

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    32 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The friendship choices of two hundred twenty-six 11- to 12-year-old students and one hundred fifty 14- to 15-year-old students in Northern Ireland were examined, The students attended a planned integrated school, a Protestant desegregated school, or a Catholic desegregated school. Fifty-two percent of the total sample was Protestant, and 48% was Catholic. In-group bias was the exception rather than the rule, in all 3 schools, and was exhibited most often by secondary-school students during the ist months of their ist year. Intergroup contact seemed to help foster cross-group relationships, but there was no evidence that any 1 type of school was more effective in this respect.
    LanguageEnglish
    Pages549-558
    JournalJournal of Social Psychology
    Volume136
    Issue number5
    Publication statusPublished - Oct 1996

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    Cite this

    McClenahan, C., Cairns, E., Dunn, S., & Morgan, V. (1996). Intergroup friendships: Integrated and desegregated schools in northern Ireland. Journal of Social Psychology, 136(5), 549-558.
    McClenahan, Carol ; Cairns, Ed ; Dunn, S ; Morgan, V. / Intergroup friendships: Integrated and desegregated schools in northern Ireland. In: Journal of Social Psychology. 1996 ; Vol. 136, No. 5. pp. 549-558.
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    McClenahan, C, Cairns, E, Dunn, S & Morgan, V 1996, 'Intergroup friendships: Integrated and desegregated schools in northern Ireland', Journal of Social Psychology, vol. 136, no. 5, pp. 549-558.

    Intergroup friendships: Integrated and desegregated schools in northern Ireland. / McClenahan, Carol; Cairns, Ed; Dunn, S; Morgan, V.

    In: Journal of Social Psychology, Vol. 136, No. 5, 10.1996, p. 549-558.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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