Inclusive Youth Work Practice

Derick Wilson

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Abstract

    In a changing economic context there will be partisan drivers mobilising separateness. However remaining separate, whether acknowledged or not, is to root relationships with others in open or hidden rivalry and hostility.Separateness is never benign, but always conceals hostility, violence and threat. Separateness is the enemy of good relations between different citizens from diverse backgrounds. Good relations between citizens depends on practical experiences of being justly treated, acknowledged as being equal and different and embraced in an interdependent manner .To support young people to develop compassion, moving them beyond the millstone of hurtful relationships and beyond their own sense of what they were capable of is a core task.To free their imagination, live hopefully and experience change is inclusive youth work practice. To sustain young people as they take new steps and experience diversity with its discomfort and excitement is to grow an intergenerational culture more at ease with different others. To sustain such a culture grow in the centres of our societies, North and South, is to nurture and sustain something new. The more it happens, and in the more unexpected places, the stronger civil society will become. The new knowledge needed is the experience of being with different others and being at ease. This knowledge has to be experienced and it is experienced in relationships where old separating lines are ‘transgressed’. In such meetings new knowledge is created and new experiences of ‘otherness’ grow. To treat one another fairly and justly; to recognise and value difference and to build a more interdependent society are values worth working for.
    LanguageEnglish
    Title of host publicationUnknown Host Publication
    EditorsLeighann Mc Conville
    Place of PublicationProduced by the Curriculum Development Unit, Antrim Board Centre, 17 Lough Road, Antrim BT41 4DH. Phone 028 9448 2336
    Number of pages24
    Publication statusPublished - Dec 2011
    EventInclusive Youth Work in Ireland, North and South (National Youth Council for Ireland; Youth Action) - Dundalk
    Duration: 1 Dec 2011 → …

    Conference

    ConferenceInclusive Youth Work in Ireland, North and South (National Youth Council for Ireland; Youth Action)
    Period1/12/11 → …

    Fingerprint

    youth work
    experience
    citizen
    foreignness
    knowledge
    Values
    civil society
    driver
    threat
    violence
    society
    economics

    Keywords

    • Inclusion
    • Youthwork
    • Separation
    • Interdependence
    • Diversity

    Cite this

    Wilson, D. (2011). Inclusive Youth Work Practice. In L. Mc Conville (Ed.), Unknown Host Publication Produced by the Curriculum Development Unit, Antrim Board Centre, 17 Lough Road, Antrim BT41 4DH. Phone 028 9448 2336.
    Wilson, Derick. / Inclusive Youth Work Practice. Unknown Host Publication. editor / Leighann Mc Conville. Produced by the Curriculum Development Unit, Antrim Board Centre, 17 Lough Road, Antrim BT41 4DH. Phone 028 9448 2336, 2011.
    @inproceedings{d5cd9b2f109c4265afdfcdfd80eb581f,
    title = "Inclusive Youth Work Practice",
    abstract = "In a changing economic context there will be partisan drivers mobilising separateness. However remaining separate, whether acknowledged or not, is to root relationships with others in open or hidden rivalry and hostility.Separateness is never benign, but always conceals hostility, violence and threat. Separateness is the enemy of good relations between different citizens from diverse backgrounds. Good relations between citizens depends on practical experiences of being justly treated, acknowledged as being equal and different and embraced in an interdependent manner .To support young people to develop compassion, moving them beyond the millstone of hurtful relationships and beyond their own sense of what they were capable of is a core task.To free their imagination, live hopefully and experience change is inclusive youth work practice. To sustain young people as they take new steps and experience diversity with its discomfort and excitement is to grow an intergenerational culture more at ease with different others. To sustain such a culture grow in the centres of our societies, North and South, is to nurture and sustain something new. The more it happens, and in the more unexpected places, the stronger civil society will become. The new knowledge needed is the experience of being with different others and being at ease. This knowledge has to be experienced and it is experienced in relationships where old separating lines are ‘transgressed’. In such meetings new knowledge is created and new experiences of ‘otherness’ grow. To treat one another fairly and justly; to recognise and value difference and to build a more interdependent society are values worth working for.",
    keywords = "Inclusion, Youthwork, Separation, Interdependence, Diversity",
    author = "Derick Wilson",
    note = "Reference text: Niebuhr in Shriver, Honest Patriots, OUP, 2005 See the Equality and Good Relations Legislation, Section 75 (1) & (2), NI Act, 1998 Eyben, Karin, Morrow, Duncan and Wilson, Derick (1997) A Worthwhile Venture? Practically Investigating in Equity, Diversity and Interdependence in Northern Ireland. University of Ulster. 261 pp ISBN ISBN 1 85923 082 2 Eyben et al, A Framework for Organisational Learning and Change, 2001, p103. http://eprints.ulster.ac.uk/12598/ Inflections of 'community' in educational work and research, Ian Martin, University of Edinburgh, 2003 Wilson, D. A., Coming of Age at Last? Youth Work, the Good Relations Legislation and the Shared Future Policy in Northern Ireland in Youth Studies Ireland, 2007, NUIM. See Wilson, Zeldin & Collura (eds) Creating Restorative and Intergenerational Cultures for Youth: Insights from Northern Ireland and the United States, A Special Issue of SAGE USA “Youth and Society” November 2010. www.sageonline Pavlich, G., The Force of Community in Restorative, Justice and Civil Society, Strang, H and Braithwaite, J., (eds), 2001, Cambridge University Press pp 56-68.) Levinas, Emmanuel, Time and the other (and additional essays) / Emmanuel Levinas ; translation by Richard A. Cohen. Pittsburgh, Pa.: Duquesne University Press, 1987.",
    year = "2011",
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    editor = "{Mc Conville}, Leighann",
    booktitle = "Unknown Host Publication",

    }

    Wilson, D 2011, Inclusive Youth Work Practice. in L Mc Conville (ed.), Unknown Host Publication. Produced by the Curriculum Development Unit, Antrim Board Centre, 17 Lough Road, Antrim BT41 4DH. Phone 028 9448 2336, Inclusive Youth Work in Ireland, North and South (National Youth Council for Ireland; Youth Action), 1/12/11.

    Inclusive Youth Work Practice. / Wilson, Derick.

    Unknown Host Publication. ed. / Leighann Mc Conville. Produced by the Curriculum Development Unit, Antrim Board Centre, 17 Lough Road, Antrim BT41 4DH. Phone 028 9448 2336, 2011.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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    N1 - Reference text: Niebuhr in Shriver, Honest Patriots, OUP, 2005 See the Equality and Good Relations Legislation, Section 75 (1) & (2), NI Act, 1998 Eyben, Karin, Morrow, Duncan and Wilson, Derick (1997) A Worthwhile Venture? Practically Investigating in Equity, Diversity and Interdependence in Northern Ireland. University of Ulster. 261 pp ISBN ISBN 1 85923 082 2 Eyben et al, A Framework for Organisational Learning and Change, 2001, p103. http://eprints.ulster.ac.uk/12598/ Inflections of 'community' in educational work and research, Ian Martin, University of Edinburgh, 2003 Wilson, D. A., Coming of Age at Last? Youth Work, the Good Relations Legislation and the Shared Future Policy in Northern Ireland in Youth Studies Ireland, 2007, NUIM. See Wilson, Zeldin & Collura (eds) Creating Restorative and Intergenerational Cultures for Youth: Insights from Northern Ireland and the United States, A Special Issue of SAGE USA “Youth and Society” November 2010. www.sageonline Pavlich, G., The Force of Community in Restorative, Justice and Civil Society, Strang, H and Braithwaite, J., (eds), 2001, Cambridge University Press pp 56-68.) Levinas, Emmanuel, Time and the other (and additional essays) / Emmanuel Levinas ; translation by Richard A. Cohen. Pittsburgh, Pa.: Duquesne University Press, 1987.

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    AB - In a changing economic context there will be partisan drivers mobilising separateness. However remaining separate, whether acknowledged or not, is to root relationships with others in open or hidden rivalry and hostility.Separateness is never benign, but always conceals hostility, violence and threat. Separateness is the enemy of good relations between different citizens from diverse backgrounds. Good relations between citizens depends on practical experiences of being justly treated, acknowledged as being equal and different and embraced in an interdependent manner .To support young people to develop compassion, moving them beyond the millstone of hurtful relationships and beyond their own sense of what they were capable of is a core task.To free their imagination, live hopefully and experience change is inclusive youth work practice. To sustain young people as they take new steps and experience diversity with its discomfort and excitement is to grow an intergenerational culture more at ease with different others. To sustain such a culture grow in the centres of our societies, North and South, is to nurture and sustain something new. The more it happens, and in the more unexpected places, the stronger civil society will become. The new knowledge needed is the experience of being with different others and being at ease. This knowledge has to be experienced and it is experienced in relationships where old separating lines are ‘transgressed’. In such meetings new knowledge is created and new experiences of ‘otherness’ grow. To treat one another fairly and justly; to recognise and value difference and to build a more interdependent society are values worth working for.

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    KW - Youthwork

    KW - Separation

    KW - Interdependence

    KW - Diversity

    M3 - Conference contribution

    BT - Unknown Host Publication

    A2 - Mc Conville, Leighann

    CY - Produced by the Curriculum Development Unit, Antrim Board Centre, 17 Lough Road, Antrim BT41 4DH. Phone 028 9448 2336

    ER -

    Wilson D. Inclusive Youth Work Practice. In Mc Conville L, editor, Unknown Host Publication. Produced by the Curriculum Development Unit, Antrim Board Centre, 17 Lough Road, Antrim BT41 4DH. Phone 028 9448 2336. 2011