Implicit alcohol-related expectancies and the effect of context

Rebecca, L. Monk, Charlotte, R Pennington, Claire Campbell, Alan Price, Derek Heim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective:
The current study examined the impact of varying pictorial cues and testing contexts on implicit alcohol-related expectancies.

Method:
Seventy-six participants were assigned randomly to complete an Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure (IRAP) in either a pub or lecture context. The IRAP exposed participants to pictorial cues that depicted an alcoholic beverage in the foreground of a pub (alcohol-congruent stimuli) or university lecture theater (alcohol-incongruent stimuli), and participants were required to match both positive and negative alcohol-related outcome expectancies to these stimuli. Corresponding to a 4 × 2 design, IRAP trial types were included in the analysis as repeated-measure variables, whereas testing environment was input as a between-participants variable.

Results:
Participants more readily endorsed that drinking alcohol was related to positive expectancies when responding to alcohol-congruent stimuli, and this was strengthened when participants completed the task in a pub. Moreover, they more readily confirmed that alcohol was related to negative expectancies when responding to alcohol-incongruent stimuli.

Conclusions:
These findings suggest that alcohol-related cues and environmental contexts may be a significant driver of positive alcohol-related cognitions, which may have implications for the design of interventions. They emphasize further the importance of examining implicit cognitions in ecologically valid testing contexts.
LanguageEnglish
Pages819-827
JournalJOURNAL OF STUDIES ON ALCOHOL AND DRUGS
Volume77
Issue number5
Early online date7 Sep 2016
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 7 Sep 2016

Fingerprint

alcohol
Alcohols
stimulus
Cues
Cognition
cognition
Testing
Alcoholic Beverages
Theaters
Alcohol Drinking
alcoholism
theater
driver
university

Keywords

  • Alcohol
  • Outcome expectancies
  • Context
  • Implicit cognitions

Cite this

Monk, R. L., Pennington, C. R., Campbell, C., Price, A., & Heim, D. (2016). Implicit alcohol-related expectancies and the effect of context. 77(5), 819-827. https://doi.org/10.15288/jsad.2016.77.819
Monk, Rebecca, L. ; Pennington, Charlotte, R ; Campbell, Claire ; Price, Alan ; Heim, Derek . / Implicit alcohol-related expectancies and the effect of context. 2016 ; Vol. 77, No. 5. pp. 819-827.
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Monk, RL, Pennington, CR, Campbell, C, Price, A & Heim, D 2016, 'Implicit alcohol-related expectancies and the effect of context', vol. 77, no. 5, pp. 819-827. https://doi.org/10.15288/jsad.2016.77.819

Implicit alcohol-related expectancies and the effect of context. / Monk, Rebecca, L.; Pennington, Charlotte, R; Campbell, Claire; Price, Alan; Heim, Derek .

Vol. 77, No. 5, 07.09.2016, p. 819-827.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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