Implications of end-user behaviour in response to deficiencies in water supply for electricity consumption: A case study of Delhi

Ruchira Ghosh, Arun Kansal, Sakshi Aghi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)
12 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Over the past two decades, urban lifestyles have changed phenomenally. One aspect of this change is the increasing use of household appliances, which, in turn, influences water and electricity consumption in urban households. It is therefore necessary to revisit water supply norms in view of these behavioural changes. Increasing use of water-related appliances by the surveyed households in Delhi, India has lowered their water consumption but increased their electricity consumption (10–16 kW h a month). Also, longer working hours away from homes have shifted water demand from homes to commercial establishments and institutions. The per-capita water requirement to meet the basic needs for health and hygiene is approximately 76–78 L a day, of which bathing claims the largest share (32%). Nearly 70% of electricity consumption of a household is spent in coping with deficiencies in water supply. Strategies adopted by end users to save water were negatively correlated with those to save electricity. Household incomes have no influence on water consumption except in the case of those living in slums, who are forced to curtail their use of water even at the cost of health and hygiene; for the rest, coping with poor water supply amounts to spending nearly 50% more on electricity, defeating the purpose of subsidised water supply.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)400
Number of pages408
JournalJournal of Hydrology
Volume536
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2016

Keywords

  • Domestic water demands
  • Electricity consumption
  • Household water use
  • Water saving strategies
  • Water-use related applianc

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