“…It might not have occurred to my husband that this woman, his wife who is taking care of him has some emotional needs as well…”: The Unheard Voices of Partners of Black African and Black Caribbean Men with Prostate Cancer

Olufikayo Bamidele, Briege M Lagan, Helen McGarvey, Daniela Wittmann, Eilis McCaughan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE:
Evidence suggests that partners of men with prostate cancer (CaP) experience greater psychosocial distress compared with men themselves. However, the experiences of partners of high-risk (1 in 4) Black African (BA) and Black Caribbean (BC) men with CaP remain poorly understood as existing research has predominantly focused on Caucasian populations. This study aimed to address this gap by exploring partners' experience and support needs as influenced both by the specific impacts of CaP, treatment side effects and socio-cultural context.

METHODS:
Using a constructivist grounded theory approach, eight face-to-face, two Skype and one telephone interviews were conducted with eligible partners (n = 11). The interviews were analysed using constant comparison following key stages of open, focused and theoretical coding.

RESULTS:
Three broad categories emerged which described participants' experiences: 'partner in the passenger seat', 'care-giving on an isolating journey', and 'coping as a partner'. Findings showed that BA and BC cultural marital context influenced how partners experienced and traversed the CaP journey. Peripheral involvement in decision-making, communication restrictions, limited access to support and lack of recognition for their experiences and needs further contributed to partners' psychological and emotional distress.

CONCLUSIONS:
Cultural beliefs, behaviours and values should be taken into account when developing psychosocial support for partners and their men with CaP. Specifically providing information focused on partners and including them in the CaP care pathway could help ensure that partners' needs are recognised and improve marital communications. This could potentially help partners and their men to identify acceptable ways of supporting each other throughout the CaP experience.
LanguageEnglish
Number of pages9
JournalSupportive Care in Cancer
Early online date15 Aug 2018
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 15 Aug 2018

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Spouses
Prostatic Neoplasms
Communication
Interviews
Decision Making
Psychology
Research
Population
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Prostate Cancer
  • Black African
  • Black Caribbean
  • Partners
  • Wives
  • Experience
  • Grounded Theory

Cite this

@article{3139d3ede8924b9faaf1dbcec7e76ff5,
title = "“…It might not have occurred to my husband that this woman, his wife who is taking care of him has some emotional needs as well…”: The Unheard Voices of Partners of Black African and Black Caribbean Men with Prostate Cancer",
abstract = "PURPOSE:Evidence suggests that partners of men with prostate cancer (CaP) experience greater psychosocial distress compared with men themselves. However, the experiences of partners of high-risk (1 in 4) Black African (BA) and Black Caribbean (BC) men with CaP remain poorly understood as existing research has predominantly focused on Caucasian populations. This study aimed to address this gap by exploring partners' experience and support needs as influenced both by the specific impacts of CaP, treatment side effects and socio-cultural context.METHODS:Using a constructivist grounded theory approach, eight face-to-face, two Skype and one telephone interviews were conducted with eligible partners (n = 11). The interviews were analysed using constant comparison following key stages of open, focused and theoretical coding.RESULTS:Three broad categories emerged which described participants' experiences: 'partner in the passenger seat', 'care-giving on an isolating journey', and 'coping as a partner'. Findings showed that BA and BC cultural marital context influenced how partners experienced and traversed the CaP journey. Peripheral involvement in decision-making, communication restrictions, limited access to support and lack of recognition for their experiences and needs further contributed to partners' psychological and emotional distress.CONCLUSIONS:Cultural beliefs, behaviours and values should be taken into account when developing psychosocial support for partners and their men with CaP. Specifically providing information focused on partners and including them in the CaP care pathway could help ensure that partners' needs are recognised and improve marital communications. This could potentially help partners and their men to identify acceptable ways of supporting each other throughout the CaP experience.",
keywords = "Prostate Cancer, Black African, Black Caribbean, Partners, Wives , Experience, Grounded Theory",
author = "Olufikayo Bamidele and Lagan, {Briege M} and Helen McGarvey and Daniela Wittmann and Eilis McCaughan",
note = "The following is sited by Springer Nature https://www.springernature.com/gp/researchers/sharedit Springer Nature wants researchers to share content easily and legally. Our Springer Nature SharedIt content-sharing initiative means that links to view-only, full-text subscription research articles can be posted anywhere - including on social media platforms, author websites and in institutional repositories - so researchers can share research with colleagues and general audiences.",
year = "2018",
month = "8",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1007/s00520-018-4398-4",
language = "English",
journal = "Supportive Care in Cancer",
issn = "0941-4355",

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T1 - “…It might not have occurred to my husband that this woman, his wife who is taking care of him has some emotional needs as well…”: The Unheard Voices of Partners of Black African and Black Caribbean Men with Prostate Cancer

AU - Bamidele, Olufikayo

AU - Lagan, Briege M

AU - McGarvey, Helen

AU - Wittmann, Daniela

AU - McCaughan, Eilis

N1 - The following is sited by Springer Nature https://www.springernature.com/gp/researchers/sharedit Springer Nature wants researchers to share content easily and legally. Our Springer Nature SharedIt content-sharing initiative means that links to view-only, full-text subscription research articles can be posted anywhere - including on social media platforms, author websites and in institutional repositories - so researchers can share research with colleagues and general audiences.

PY - 2018/8/15

Y1 - 2018/8/15

N2 - PURPOSE:Evidence suggests that partners of men with prostate cancer (CaP) experience greater psychosocial distress compared with men themselves. However, the experiences of partners of high-risk (1 in 4) Black African (BA) and Black Caribbean (BC) men with CaP remain poorly understood as existing research has predominantly focused on Caucasian populations. This study aimed to address this gap by exploring partners' experience and support needs as influenced both by the specific impacts of CaP, treatment side effects and socio-cultural context.METHODS:Using a constructivist grounded theory approach, eight face-to-face, two Skype and one telephone interviews were conducted with eligible partners (n = 11). The interviews were analysed using constant comparison following key stages of open, focused and theoretical coding.RESULTS:Three broad categories emerged which described participants' experiences: 'partner in the passenger seat', 'care-giving on an isolating journey', and 'coping as a partner'. Findings showed that BA and BC cultural marital context influenced how partners experienced and traversed the CaP journey. Peripheral involvement in decision-making, communication restrictions, limited access to support and lack of recognition for their experiences and needs further contributed to partners' psychological and emotional distress.CONCLUSIONS:Cultural beliefs, behaviours and values should be taken into account when developing psychosocial support for partners and their men with CaP. Specifically providing information focused on partners and including them in the CaP care pathway could help ensure that partners' needs are recognised and improve marital communications. This could potentially help partners and their men to identify acceptable ways of supporting each other throughout the CaP experience.

AB - PURPOSE:Evidence suggests that partners of men with prostate cancer (CaP) experience greater psychosocial distress compared with men themselves. However, the experiences of partners of high-risk (1 in 4) Black African (BA) and Black Caribbean (BC) men with CaP remain poorly understood as existing research has predominantly focused on Caucasian populations. This study aimed to address this gap by exploring partners' experience and support needs as influenced both by the specific impacts of CaP, treatment side effects and socio-cultural context.METHODS:Using a constructivist grounded theory approach, eight face-to-face, two Skype and one telephone interviews were conducted with eligible partners (n = 11). The interviews were analysed using constant comparison following key stages of open, focused and theoretical coding.RESULTS:Three broad categories emerged which described participants' experiences: 'partner in the passenger seat', 'care-giving on an isolating journey', and 'coping as a partner'. Findings showed that BA and BC cultural marital context influenced how partners experienced and traversed the CaP journey. Peripheral involvement in decision-making, communication restrictions, limited access to support and lack of recognition for their experiences and needs further contributed to partners' psychological and emotional distress.CONCLUSIONS:Cultural beliefs, behaviours and values should be taken into account when developing psychosocial support for partners and their men with CaP. Specifically providing information focused on partners and including them in the CaP care pathway could help ensure that partners' needs are recognised and improve marital communications. This could potentially help partners and their men to identify acceptable ways of supporting each other throughout the CaP experience.

KW - Prostate Cancer

KW - Black African

KW - Black Caribbean

KW - Partners

KW - Wives

KW - Experience

KW - Grounded Theory

UR - https://rdcu.be/4Bkq

UR - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30112723

U2 - 10.1007/s00520-018-4398-4

DO - 10.1007/s00520-018-4398-4

M3 - Article

JO - Supportive Care in Cancer

T2 - Supportive Care in Cancer

JF - Supportive Care in Cancer

SN - 0941-4355

ER -