If you’re not bothered, neither am I: The implications of disengaged obese patients for clinician education.

Toni McAloon, Vivien Coates, Donna Fitzsimons

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Introduction: Obesity is a major factor leading to over 36 million deaths annually worldwide, often related to diabetes and cardio-vascular disease. In light of premature mortality, increasing morbidity and healthcare costs, clinical practice is under scrutiny to improve management practices. However it is acknowledged globally that obesity management strategies are failing to have an impact. Aim: to establish healthcare clinicians’ attitudes towards patients with obesity and test the extent their attitudes influence obesity management.Methods: This innovative study generated online vignettes via Factorial Survey Design methods to assess clinician obesity management. Attitude measures assessed anti-fat bias. Data were collected anonymously from a multi-professional convenience sample in a virtual research site. Multiple gatekeepers in four sites emailed invitations to potential participants who participated via a hyperlink. Volunteers self-administered vignettes with integrated patient photographs, demographic questions and attitude measures. Completion provided instant personalised obesity attitude feedback. Analysis utilised multivariate regression, ANOVA and summary statistics. Results: n=427 (79% female), 48% nurses, 35% doctors, 9% dietitians with 59% post registrants / 33% pre registrants. A widespread anti-fat bias was identified. Vignettes portraying patient ambivalence and lack of motivation were associated with statistically significant clinician disengagement via reduced motivation, decreased likelihood of discussing weight and decreased time spent with the patient.Conclusion: By improving understanding of clinician engagement with obese patients this study will inform the development of more targeted educational interventions aimed at improving obesity management.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationUnknown Host Publication
Pages113-113
Number of pages1
Volume33
Publication statusPublished - 3 Mar 2016
EventDiabetes UK Professional Conference 2016 - Glasgow
Duration: 3 Mar 2016 → …

Conference

ConferenceDiabetes UK Professional Conference 2016
Period3/03/16 → …

Fingerprint

Patient Education
Obesity
Motivation
Fats
Premature Mortality
Nutritionists
Practice Management
Vascular Diseases
Health Care Costs
Volunteers
Analysis of Variance
Multivariate Analysis
Nurses
Demography
Morbidity
Delivery of Health Care
Weights and Measures
Research

Keywords

  • Obesity
  • attitudes
  • disengagement
  • clinical education

Cite this

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title = "If you’re not bothered, neither am I: The implications of disengaged obese patients for clinician education.",
abstract = "Introduction: Obesity is a major factor leading to over 36 million deaths annually worldwide, often related to diabetes and cardio-vascular disease. In light of premature mortality, increasing morbidity and healthcare costs, clinical practice is under scrutiny to improve management practices. However it is acknowledged globally that obesity management strategies are failing to have an impact. Aim: to establish healthcare clinicians’ attitudes towards patients with obesity and test the extent their attitudes influence obesity management.Methods: This innovative study generated online vignettes via Factorial Survey Design methods to assess clinician obesity management. Attitude measures assessed anti-fat bias. Data were collected anonymously from a multi-professional convenience sample in a virtual research site. Multiple gatekeepers in four sites emailed invitations to potential participants who participated via a hyperlink. Volunteers self-administered vignettes with integrated patient photographs, demographic questions and attitude measures. Completion provided instant personalised obesity attitude feedback. Analysis utilised multivariate regression, ANOVA and summary statistics. Results: n=427 (79{\%} female), 48{\%} nurses, 35{\%} doctors, 9{\%} dietitians with 59{\%} post registrants / 33{\%} pre registrants. A widespread anti-fat bias was identified. Vignettes portraying patient ambivalence and lack of motivation were associated with statistically significant clinician disengagement via reduced motivation, decreased likelihood of discussing weight and decreased time spent with the patient.Conclusion: By improving understanding of clinician engagement with obese patients this study will inform the development of more targeted educational interventions aimed at improving obesity management.",
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author = "Toni McAloon and Vivien Coates and Donna Fitzsimons",
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McAloon, T, Coates, V & Fitzsimons, D 2016, If you’re not bothered, neither am I: The implications of disengaged obese patients for clinician education. in Unknown Host Publication. vol. 33, pp. 113-113, Diabetes UK Professional Conference 2016, 3/03/16.

If you’re not bothered, neither am I: The implications of disengaged obese patients for clinician education. / McAloon, Toni; Coates, Vivien; Fitzsimons, Donna.

Unknown Host Publication. Vol. 33 2016. p. 113-113.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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N2 - Introduction: Obesity is a major factor leading to over 36 million deaths annually worldwide, often related to diabetes and cardio-vascular disease. In light of premature mortality, increasing morbidity and healthcare costs, clinical practice is under scrutiny to improve management practices. However it is acknowledged globally that obesity management strategies are failing to have an impact. Aim: to establish healthcare clinicians’ attitudes towards patients with obesity and test the extent their attitudes influence obesity management.Methods: This innovative study generated online vignettes via Factorial Survey Design methods to assess clinician obesity management. Attitude measures assessed anti-fat bias. Data were collected anonymously from a multi-professional convenience sample in a virtual research site. Multiple gatekeepers in four sites emailed invitations to potential participants who participated via a hyperlink. Volunteers self-administered vignettes with integrated patient photographs, demographic questions and attitude measures. Completion provided instant personalised obesity attitude feedback. Analysis utilised multivariate regression, ANOVA and summary statistics. Results: n=427 (79% female), 48% nurses, 35% doctors, 9% dietitians with 59% post registrants / 33% pre registrants. A widespread anti-fat bias was identified. Vignettes portraying patient ambivalence and lack of motivation were associated with statistically significant clinician disengagement via reduced motivation, decreased likelihood of discussing weight and decreased time spent with the patient.Conclusion: By improving understanding of clinician engagement with obese patients this study will inform the development of more targeted educational interventions aimed at improving obesity management.

AB - Introduction: Obesity is a major factor leading to over 36 million deaths annually worldwide, often related to diabetes and cardio-vascular disease. In light of premature mortality, increasing morbidity and healthcare costs, clinical practice is under scrutiny to improve management practices. However it is acknowledged globally that obesity management strategies are failing to have an impact. Aim: to establish healthcare clinicians’ attitudes towards patients with obesity and test the extent their attitudes influence obesity management.Methods: This innovative study generated online vignettes via Factorial Survey Design methods to assess clinician obesity management. Attitude measures assessed anti-fat bias. Data were collected anonymously from a multi-professional convenience sample in a virtual research site. Multiple gatekeepers in four sites emailed invitations to potential participants who participated via a hyperlink. Volunteers self-administered vignettes with integrated patient photographs, demographic questions and attitude measures. Completion provided instant personalised obesity attitude feedback. Analysis utilised multivariate regression, ANOVA and summary statistics. Results: n=427 (79% female), 48% nurses, 35% doctors, 9% dietitians with 59% post registrants / 33% pre registrants. A widespread anti-fat bias was identified. Vignettes portraying patient ambivalence and lack of motivation were associated with statistically significant clinician disengagement via reduced motivation, decreased likelihood of discussing weight and decreased time spent with the patient.Conclusion: By improving understanding of clinician engagement with obese patients this study will inform the development of more targeted educational interventions aimed at improving obesity management.

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