If you are not one of them you feel out of place: understanding divisions in a Northern Irish town

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper examines and reflects on the use of GPS tracking devices as a method to understand and analyse young people’s everyday movement in Northern Ireland, a divided society emerging from conflict. The paper also seeks to contribute to the extensive body of literature which already exists on young people’s geographies and movements within the Northern Ireland context. We highlight how the use of GPS together with more traditional methods gives us considerable insights of movements of young people in Northern Ireland and sheds light on the communal divisions in one town in Northern Ireland, Coleraine. We argue that the use of a GPS methodology significantly adds to the understanding of young people’s movements and geographies, particularly in a post-conflict context where notions of place and territory have particular significance.
LanguageEnglish
Pages452-465
JournalChildren's Geographies
Volume15
Issue number4
Early online date28 Dec 2016
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 28 Dec 2016

Fingerprint

Northern Ireland
town
Geography
GPS
geography
Equipment and Supplies
methodology
young
method
conflict

Keywords

  • GPS
  • Northern Ireland
  • division
  • young people
  • conflict

Cite this

@article{3db878c3b6bc45338986b6a834e0c2df,
title = "If you are not one of them you feel out of place: understanding divisions in a Northern Irish town",
abstract = "This paper examines and reflects on the use of GPS tracking devices as a method to understand and analyse young people’s everyday movement in Northern Ireland, a divided society emerging from conflict. The paper also seeks to contribute to the extensive body of literature which already exists on young people’s geographies and movements within the Northern Ireland context. We highlight how the use of GPS together with more traditional methods gives us considerable insights of movements of young people in Northern Ireland and sheds light on the communal divisions in one town in Northern Ireland, Coleraine. We argue that the use of a GPS methodology significantly adds to the understanding of young people’s movements and geographies, particularly in a post-conflict context where notions of place and territory have particular significance.",
keywords = "GPS, Northern Ireland, division, young people, conflict",
author = "Stephen Roulston and Ulf Hansson and Sally Cook and Paul McKenzie",
note = "Reference text: Ark (various dates) Northern Ireland Young Life and Times Survey Available from http://www.ark.ac.uk/ylt/. Accessed 12.2.16 Bell, J., N. Jarman, and B. Harvey, B. 2010. Beyond Belfast: Contested Spaces in Urban Rural and Cross Border Settings. Belfast, Northern Ireland Community Relations Council. Boal, F.W. 2008. Territoriality on the Shankill-Falls divide: Being wise after the event. Irish Geography 41.3: 329–335 Byrne, J., Conway, M., and Ostermeyer, M. 2005. Young people’s attitudes and experiences of policing, violence and community safety in North Belfast. Belfast, UK: Northern Ireland Policing Board. CAIN (Conflict Archive on the Internet). 2015. Violence - Draft List of Deaths Related to the Conflict from 2002. http://cain.ulst.ac.uk/issues/violence/deathsfrom2002draft.htm#2009 Cairns, E., J. Kenworthy, A. Campbell, and M. Hewstone, (2006) The Role of In-Group Identification, Religious Group Membership and Intergroup Conflict in Moderating In-Group and Out-Group Affect. British Journal of Social Psychology 46: 701-716. Christensen, P., M. R. Mikkelsen, T. A. S. Neilsen, and H. Harder. 2011. Children, Mobility, and Space: Using GPS and Mobile Phone Technologies in Ethnographic Research. Journal of Mixed Methods Research 5.3: 227-246 Devine, P. 2013. “Into the Mix.” ARK Research Update 83. www.ark.ac.uk/publications/updates/update83.pdf Dixon, P. 2002. Political Skills or Lying and Manipulation? The Choreography of the Northern Ireland Peace Process. Political Studies 50.4: 725-741 Gardner, J. 2016. Education in Northern Ireland since the Good Friday Agreement: Kabuki theatre meets danse macabre. Oxford Review of Education 42:3: 346-361 Graham, B. and C. Nash. 2006. A Shared Future: Territoriality, pluralism and public policy in Northern Ireland. Political Geography 25.3: 253-278 Hamilton, J., U. Hansson, J. Bell, and S. Toucas. 2008. Segregated Lives: Social Division, Sectarianism and Everyday Life in Northern Ireland. Belfast, Institute of Conflict Research. Hargie, O., D. Dickson, and A. O’Donnell. 2006. Breaking Down Barriers: Sectarianism, Unemployment and the Exclusion of Disadvantaged Young People from Northern Ireland Society. Jordanstown: University of Ulster. Hayes, B.C., I. McAllister, and L. Dowds. 2007. 'Integrated education, intergroup relations, and political identities in Northern Ireland'. Social Problems 54.4: 454-482. Hughes, J., A. Campbell, M. Hewstone, and E. Cairns. 2007. Segregation in Northern Ireland. Policy Studies 28.1: 33-53 Jarman, N. 2005. No Longer a Problem? Sectarian Violence in Northern Ireland. Belfast: Institute for Conflict Research. Komarova, M. 2008. Shared Space in Belfast and the Limits of a Shared Future. Divided Cities/Contested States, Working Paper No. 3. Accessed March 2, 2012. www.conflictincities.org/workingpapers.html Leonard, M. 2006. Teens and territory in contested spaces: Negotiating sectarian interfaces in Northern Ireland. Children's Geographies 4.2: 225-238 Leonard, M. 2007. 'With a Capital {"}G{"}: Gatekeepers and Gatekeeping in Research with Children'. in A Best (ed.), Representing Youth: Methodological Issues in Critical Youth Studies. New York University Press. 153-169. Leonard, M. 2010. Parochial geographies: Growing up in divided Belfast. Childhood 17.3: 329-342 Leonard, M. and M. McKnight. 2010. Teenagers’ perceptions of Belfast as a divided and/or shared city. Shared Space, (10), 23–37 Available from http://www.community-relations.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2010/01/chapter-two.pdf Accessed 10.2.16 Leonard, M. & M. McKnight. 2015. Traditions and transitions: teenagers' perceptions of parading in Belfast. Children's Geographies 13.4: 398-412 Lichter, D.T., Parisi, D. and Taquino, M.C. 2012. The Geography of Exclusion Race, Segregation, and Concentrated Poverty. Social Problems 59.3 (August 2012): 364-388 Mackett, R., B. Brown, Y. Gong, K. Kitazawa, and J. Paskins. 2007. Children’s Independent Movement in the Local Environment. Built Environment 33.4: 454-468 Massey, D. S. and Fischer, M.J. 2003. The Geography of Inequality in the United States, 1950− 2000. In Brookings-Wharton Papers on Urban Affairs, 2003, edited by W. G. Gale and J. R. Pack. Washington, DC: The Brookings Institution: 1-29 McAlister, S., P. Scraton, and D. Haydon. 2009. Childhood in Transition: Experiencing Marginalisation and Conflict in Northern Ireland. Belfast: Queen’s University, Save the Children and Prince’s Trust. Available from http://www.savethechildren.org.uk/resources/online-library/childhood-transition-experiencing-marginalisation-and-conflict-northern. Accessed 2.8.16 McAlister, S., P. Scraton, and D. Haydon. 2014. Childhood in transition: growing up in ‘post-conflict’ Northern Ireland. Children's Geographies. 12.3: 297-311 McGrellis, S., 2010. In transition: young people in Northern Ireland growing up in, and out of, divided communities, Ethnic and Racial Studies, 33:5: 761-778 Mikkelsen, M. R. and P. Christensen. 2009. Is Children's Independent Mobility Really Independent? A Study of Children's Mobility Combining Ethnography and GPS/Mobile Phone Technologies. Mobilities 4.1: 37-58 Morgan, A. 2000. The Belfast Agreement: A practical legal analysis. London: Belfast Press. Available from http://austenmorgan.com/Assets/PDFs/Belfast_Agreement.pdf Accessed 9.12.15 Morrow, V and M. Richards, 1996. The ethics of social research with children: an overview', Children and Society, 10.2: 90-105 Nolan, P. 2013. Northern Ireland: The Measurement of Sharing and Separation in a Post-Conflict Society. Shared Space 16: 5-20 Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency (NISRA) (n.d.) Available from http://www.nisra.gov.uk/. Accessed 14.2.16 Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency (NISRA) (various years) Young Persons Behaviour and Attitude Survey. Available from http://www.csu.nisra.gov.uk/survey.asp14.htm Accessed 10.2.16 Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency (NISRA). 2013. Area Profile Report. Coleraine http://www.colerainebc.gov.uk/content/file/Economic{\%}20Development{\%}202013/Coleraine{\%}20profile{\%}20November{\%}202013.PDF Office of the First Minister and Deputy First Minister (OFMDFM). 2005. A Shared Future. Policy and Strategic Framework for Good Relations in Northern Ireland. Belfast: OFMDFM. Available from https://www.executiveoffice-ni.gov.uk/publications/shared-future-policy-and-first-triennial-action-plan-2006-2009. Accessed 2.8.16 Office of the First Minister and Deputy First Minister (OFMDFM). 2013. Together Building a United Community. Belfast: OFMDFM. Available from https://www.executiveoffice-ni.gov.uk/publications/together-building-united-community-strategy. Accessed 2.8.16 Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI). 2015. Trends in Hate Motivated Incidents and Crimes Recorded by the Police in Northern Ireland 2004/05 to 2014/15. Annual Bulletin. http://www.psni.police.uk/hate_motivated_incidents_and_crimes_in_northern_ireland_2004-05_to_2014-15.pdf. Roche, R., 2008. Facts, Fears and Feelings Project: Sectarianism and Segregation in Urban Northern Ireland: Northern Irish Youth Post-Agreement. Belfast: School of History and Anthropology, Queen’s University Belfast Roulston, S. and O. Young. 2013 GPS tracking of some Northern Ireland students – patterns of shared and separated space: divided we stand? International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education 22.3: 241-258 Schubotz, D. and Devine, P. 2011 Segregation Preferences of 16-year Olds in Northern Ireland. What Difference Does Urban Living Make? Available from: conflictincities.org/PDFs/WP22.pdf. Accessed 17.8.16 Shirlow, P. and B. Murtagh. 2006. Belfast: Segregation, Violence and the City. London: Pluto Press. Shuttleworth I. G. and C. D. Lloyd. 2009. Are Northern Ireland’s communities dividing? Evidence from geographically consistent Census of Population data, 1971 – 2001. Environment and Planning A 41.1: 213 – 229 Shuttleworth, I. and C. Lloyd. 2013. Moving apart or moving together? A snapshot of residential segregation from the 2011 Census. Shared Space 16: 57-70 Stockinger, H. 2015. Young people’s experiences of integration and segregation in Northern Ireland (ARK Research Update 99). Wiehe, S. E., A. E. Carroll, G. C. Liu, K. L. Haberkorn, S. C. Hoch, J. S. Wilson, and K. L. Fortenberry. 2008. Using GPS-enabled cellphones to track the travel pattern of adolescents. International Journal of Health Geographics 7.22. Available from http://www.ij-healthgeographics.com/content/7/1/22 Accessed 1.2.16",
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If you are not one of them you feel out of place: understanding divisions in a Northern Irish town. / Roulston, Stephen; Hansson, Ulf; Cook, Sally; McKenzie, Paul.

In: Children's Geographies, Vol. 15, No. 4, 28.12.2016, p. 452-465.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Roulston, Stephen

AU - Hansson, Ulf

AU - Cook, Sally

AU - McKenzie, Paul

N1 - Reference text: Ark (various dates) Northern Ireland Young Life and Times Survey Available from http://www.ark.ac.uk/ylt/. Accessed 12.2.16 Bell, J., N. Jarman, and B. Harvey, B. 2010. Beyond Belfast: Contested Spaces in Urban Rural and Cross Border Settings. Belfast, Northern Ireland Community Relations Council. Boal, F.W. 2008. Territoriality on the Shankill-Falls divide: Being wise after the event. Irish Geography 41.3: 329–335 Byrne, J., Conway, M., and Ostermeyer, M. 2005. Young people’s attitudes and experiences of policing, violence and community safety in North Belfast. Belfast, UK: Northern Ireland Policing Board. CAIN (Conflict Archive on the Internet). 2015. Violence - Draft List of Deaths Related to the Conflict from 2002. http://cain.ulst.ac.uk/issues/violence/deathsfrom2002draft.htm#2009 Cairns, E., J. Kenworthy, A. Campbell, and M. Hewstone, (2006) The Role of In-Group Identification, Religious Group Membership and Intergroup Conflict in Moderating In-Group and Out-Group Affect. British Journal of Social Psychology 46: 701-716. Christensen, P., M. R. Mikkelsen, T. A. S. Neilsen, and H. Harder. 2011. Children, Mobility, and Space: Using GPS and Mobile Phone Technologies in Ethnographic Research. Journal of Mixed Methods Research 5.3: 227-246 Devine, P. 2013. “Into the Mix.” ARK Research Update 83. www.ark.ac.uk/publications/updates/update83.pdf Dixon, P. 2002. Political Skills or Lying and Manipulation? The Choreography of the Northern Ireland Peace Process. Political Studies 50.4: 725-741 Gardner, J. 2016. Education in Northern Ireland since the Good Friday Agreement: Kabuki theatre meets danse macabre. Oxford Review of Education 42:3: 346-361 Graham, B. and C. Nash. 2006. A Shared Future: Territoriality, pluralism and public policy in Northern Ireland. Political Geography 25.3: 253-278 Hamilton, J., U. Hansson, J. Bell, and S. Toucas. 2008. Segregated Lives: Social Division, Sectarianism and Everyday Life in Northern Ireland. Belfast, Institute of Conflict Research. Hargie, O., D. Dickson, and A. O’Donnell. 2006. Breaking Down Barriers: Sectarianism, Unemployment and the Exclusion of Disadvantaged Young People from Northern Ireland Society. Jordanstown: University of Ulster. Hayes, B.C., I. McAllister, and L. Dowds. 2007. 'Integrated education, intergroup relations, and political identities in Northern Ireland'. Social Problems 54.4: 454-482. Hughes, J., A. Campbell, M. Hewstone, and E. Cairns. 2007. Segregation in Northern Ireland. Policy Studies 28.1: 33-53 Jarman, N. 2005. No Longer a Problem? Sectarian Violence in Northern Ireland. Belfast: Institute for Conflict Research. Komarova, M. 2008. Shared Space in Belfast and the Limits of a Shared Future. Divided Cities/Contested States, Working Paper No. 3. Accessed March 2, 2012. www.conflictincities.org/workingpapers.html Leonard, M. 2006. Teens and territory in contested spaces: Negotiating sectarian interfaces in Northern Ireland. Children's Geographies 4.2: 225-238 Leonard, M. 2007. 'With a Capital "G": Gatekeepers and Gatekeeping in Research with Children'. in A Best (ed.), Representing Youth: Methodological Issues in Critical Youth Studies. New York University Press. 153-169. Leonard, M. 2010. Parochial geographies: Growing up in divided Belfast. Childhood 17.3: 329-342 Leonard, M. and M. McKnight. 2010. Teenagers’ perceptions of Belfast as a divided and/or shared city. Shared Space, (10), 23–37 Available from http://www.community-relations.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2010/01/chapter-two.pdf Accessed 10.2.16 Leonard, M. & M. McKnight. 2015. Traditions and transitions: teenagers' perceptions of parading in Belfast. Children's Geographies 13.4: 398-412 Lichter, D.T., Parisi, D. and Taquino, M.C. 2012. The Geography of Exclusion Race, Segregation, and Concentrated Poverty. Social Problems 59.3 (August 2012): 364-388 Mackett, R., B. Brown, Y. Gong, K. Kitazawa, and J. Paskins. 2007. Children’s Independent Movement in the Local Environment. Built Environment 33.4: 454-468 Massey, D. S. and Fischer, M.J. 2003. The Geography of Inequality in the United States, 1950− 2000. In Brookings-Wharton Papers on Urban Affairs, 2003, edited by W. G. Gale and J. R. Pack. Washington, DC: The Brookings Institution: 1-29 McAlister, S., P. Scraton, and D. Haydon. 2009. Childhood in Transition: Experiencing Marginalisation and Conflict in Northern Ireland. Belfast: Queen’s University, Save the Children and Prince’s Trust. Available from http://www.savethechildren.org.uk/resources/online-library/childhood-transition-experiencing-marginalisation-and-conflict-northern. Accessed 2.8.16 McAlister, S., P. Scraton, and D. Haydon. 2014. Childhood in transition: growing up in ‘post-conflict’ Northern Ireland. Children's Geographies. 12.3: 297-311 McGrellis, S., 2010. In transition: young people in Northern Ireland growing up in, and out of, divided communities, Ethnic and Racial Studies, 33:5: 761-778 Mikkelsen, M. R. and P. Christensen. 2009. Is Children's Independent Mobility Really Independent? A Study of Children's Mobility Combining Ethnography and GPS/Mobile Phone Technologies. Mobilities 4.1: 37-58 Morgan, A. 2000. The Belfast Agreement: A practical legal analysis. London: Belfast Press. Available from http://austenmorgan.com/Assets/PDFs/Belfast_Agreement.pdf Accessed 9.12.15 Morrow, V and M. Richards, 1996. The ethics of social research with children: an overview', Children and Society, 10.2: 90-105 Nolan, P. 2013. Northern Ireland: The Measurement of Sharing and Separation in a Post-Conflict Society. Shared Space 16: 5-20 Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency (NISRA) (n.d.) Available from http://www.nisra.gov.uk/. Accessed 14.2.16 Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency (NISRA) (various years) Young Persons Behaviour and Attitude Survey. Available from http://www.csu.nisra.gov.uk/survey.asp14.htm Accessed 10.2.16 Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency (NISRA). 2013. Area Profile Report. Coleraine http://www.colerainebc.gov.uk/content/file/Economic%20Development%202013/Coleraine%20profile%20November%202013.PDF Office of the First Minister and Deputy First Minister (OFMDFM). 2005. A Shared Future. Policy and Strategic Framework for Good Relations in Northern Ireland. Belfast: OFMDFM. Available from https://www.executiveoffice-ni.gov.uk/publications/shared-future-policy-and-first-triennial-action-plan-2006-2009. Accessed 2.8.16 Office of the First Minister and Deputy First Minister (OFMDFM). 2013. Together Building a United Community. Belfast: OFMDFM. Available from https://www.executiveoffice-ni.gov.uk/publications/together-building-united-community-strategy. Accessed 2.8.16 Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI). 2015. Trends in Hate Motivated Incidents and Crimes Recorded by the Police in Northern Ireland 2004/05 to 2014/15. Annual Bulletin. http://www.psni.police.uk/hate_motivated_incidents_and_crimes_in_northern_ireland_2004-05_to_2014-15.pdf. Roche, R., 2008. Facts, Fears and Feelings Project: Sectarianism and Segregation in Urban Northern Ireland: Northern Irish Youth Post-Agreement. Belfast: School of History and Anthropology, Queen’s University Belfast Roulston, S. and O. Young. 2013 GPS tracking of some Northern Ireland students – patterns of shared and separated space: divided we stand? International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education 22.3: 241-258 Schubotz, D. and Devine, P. 2011 Segregation Preferences of 16-year Olds in Northern Ireland. What Difference Does Urban Living Make? Available from: conflictincities.org/PDFs/WP22.pdf. Accessed 17.8.16 Shirlow, P. and B. Murtagh. 2006. Belfast: Segregation, Violence and the City. London: Pluto Press. Shuttleworth I. G. and C. D. Lloyd. 2009. Are Northern Ireland’s communities dividing? Evidence from geographically consistent Census of Population data, 1971 – 2001. Environment and Planning A 41.1: 213 – 229 Shuttleworth, I. and C. Lloyd. 2013. Moving apart or moving together? A snapshot of residential segregation from the 2011 Census. Shared Space 16: 57-70 Stockinger, H. 2015. Young people’s experiences of integration and segregation in Northern Ireland (ARK Research Update 99). Wiehe, S. E., A. E. Carroll, G. C. Liu, K. L. Haberkorn, S. C. Hoch, J. S. Wilson, and K. L. Fortenberry. 2008. Using GPS-enabled cellphones to track the travel pattern of adolescents. International Journal of Health Geographics 7.22. Available from http://www.ij-healthgeographics.com/content/7/1/22 Accessed 1.2.16

PY - 2016/12/28

Y1 - 2016/12/28

N2 - This paper examines and reflects on the use of GPS tracking devices as a method to understand and analyse young people’s everyday movement in Northern Ireland, a divided society emerging from conflict. The paper also seeks to contribute to the extensive body of literature which already exists on young people’s geographies and movements within the Northern Ireland context. We highlight how the use of GPS together with more traditional methods gives us considerable insights of movements of young people in Northern Ireland and sheds light on the communal divisions in one town in Northern Ireland, Coleraine. We argue that the use of a GPS methodology significantly adds to the understanding of young people’s movements and geographies, particularly in a post-conflict context where notions of place and territory have particular significance.

AB - This paper examines and reflects on the use of GPS tracking devices as a method to understand and analyse young people’s everyday movement in Northern Ireland, a divided society emerging from conflict. The paper also seeks to contribute to the extensive body of literature which already exists on young people’s geographies and movements within the Northern Ireland context. We highlight how the use of GPS together with more traditional methods gives us considerable insights of movements of young people in Northern Ireland and sheds light on the communal divisions in one town in Northern Ireland, Coleraine. We argue that the use of a GPS methodology significantly adds to the understanding of young people’s movements and geographies, particularly in a post-conflict context where notions of place and territory have particular significance.

KW - GPS

KW - Northern Ireland

KW - division

KW - young people

KW - conflict

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ER -