How children with autism spectrum disorder behave and explore the 4-dimensional (spatial 3D + time) environment during a joint attention induction task with a robot

Salvatore Anzalone, Elodie Tilmont, Sofiane Boucenna, Jean Xavier, Anne-Lise Jouen, Nicolas Bodeau, Koushik Maharatna, Mohamed Chetouani, David Cohen, Silvio Bonfiglio, Fabio Apicella, Filippo Muratori, Antonio Narzisi, Federico Sicca, Lucia Billeci, Giovanni Pioggia, Federico Cruciani, Cristiano Paggetti, Angele Giuliano, Maryrose Francisa & 4 others Saptarshi Das, Wasifa Jamal, Leo Galway, Mark Donnelly

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

66 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We aimed to compare, during a joint attention (JA) elicitation task, how children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and children with typical development (TD) behave and explore their 4 dimensional (meaning spatial 3D + time) when interacting with a human or with a robotic agent.We built a system that employed a Nao robot and a perception system based on a RGB-D sensor (Kinect) to capture social engagement cues. A JA induction experiment was performed in which children with ASD (N = 16) and matched TD children (N = 16) had a 3-min interaction with the robot or with a therapist. Nao induced JA by gazing; by gazing and pointing; and by gazing, pointing and vocalizing at pictures. Both groups of children performed well with the therapist. However, with Nao, both groups had lower JA scores, and the children with ASD had a significantly lower score than the TD children. We found that (i) multimodal JA induction was more efficient in both groups; (ii) the 3D spatial world gaze exploration showed less accuracy; and (iii) the trunk position in ASD showed less stability in the 4 dimensions compared to TD controls.We conclude that, in ASD, JA skill depends on the interaction partner, and implies a higher motor and cognitive cost.
LanguageEnglish
Pages814-826
JournalResearch in Autism Spectrum Disorders
Volume8
Issue number7
Early online date4 May 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2014

Fingerprint

Child Development
Robotics
Cues
Autism Spectrum Disorder
Costs and Cost Analysis

Keywords

  • Autism spectrum disorder
  • Development
  • Social engagement
  • Joint attention
  • Social robots

Cite this

Anzalone, Salvatore ; Tilmont, Elodie ; Boucenna, Sofiane ; Xavier, Jean ; Jouen, Anne-Lise ; Bodeau, Nicolas ; Maharatna, Koushik ; Chetouani, Mohamed ; Cohen, David ; Bonfiglio, Silvio ; Apicella, Fabio ; Muratori, Filippo ; Narzisi, Antonio ; Sicca, Federico ; Billeci, Lucia ; Pioggia, Giovanni ; Cruciani, Federico ; Paggetti, Cristiano ; Giuliano, Angele ; Francisa, Maryrose ; Das, Saptarshi ; Jamal, Wasifa ; Galway, Leo ; Donnelly, Mark. / How children with autism spectrum disorder behave and explore the 4-dimensional (spatial 3D + time) environment during a joint attention induction task with a robot. In: Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders. 2014 ; Vol. 8, No. 7. pp. 814-826.
@article{cb80be160d354a36aca3800f339817c2,
title = "How children with autism spectrum disorder behave and explore the 4-dimensional (spatial 3D + time) environment during a joint attention induction task with a robot",
abstract = "We aimed to compare, during a joint attention (JA) elicitation task, how children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and children with typical development (TD) behave and explore their 4 dimensional (meaning spatial 3D + time) when interacting with a human or with a robotic agent.We built a system that employed a Nao robot and a perception system based on a RGB-D sensor (Kinect) to capture social engagement cues. A JA induction experiment was performed in which children with ASD (N = 16) and matched TD children (N = 16) had a 3-min interaction with the robot or with a therapist. Nao induced JA by gazing; by gazing and pointing; and by gazing, pointing and vocalizing at pictures. Both groups of children performed well with the therapist. However, with Nao, both groups had lower JA scores, and the children with ASD had a significantly lower score than the TD children. We found that (i) multimodal JA induction was more efficient in both groups; (ii) the 3D spatial world gaze exploration showed less accuracy; and (iii) the trunk position in ASD showed less stability in the 4 dimensions compared to TD controls.We conclude that, in ASD, JA skill depends on the interaction partner, and implies a higher motor and cognitive cost.",
keywords = "Autism spectrum disorder, Development, Social engagement, Joint attention, Social robots",
author = "Salvatore Anzalone and Elodie Tilmont and Sofiane Boucenna and Jean Xavier and Anne-Lise Jouen and Nicolas Bodeau and Koushik Maharatna and Mohamed Chetouani and David Cohen and Silvio Bonfiglio and Fabio Apicella and Filippo Muratori and Antonio Narzisi and Federico Sicca and Lucia Billeci and Giovanni Pioggia and Federico Cruciani and Cristiano Paggetti and Angele Giuliano and Maryrose Francisa and Saptarshi Das and Wasifa Jamal and Leo Galway and Mark Donnelly",
year = "2014",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.rasd.2014.03.002",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
pages = "814--826",
journal = "Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders",
issn = "1750-9467",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "7",

}

Anzalone, S, Tilmont, E, Boucenna, S, Xavier, J, Jouen, A-L, Bodeau, N, Maharatna, K, Chetouani, M, Cohen, D, Bonfiglio, S, Apicella, F, Muratori, F, Narzisi, A, Sicca, F, Billeci, L, Pioggia, G, Cruciani, F, Paggetti, C, Giuliano, A, Francisa, M, Das, S, Jamal, W, Galway, L & Donnelly, M 2014, 'How children with autism spectrum disorder behave and explore the 4-dimensional (spatial 3D + time) environment during a joint attention induction task with a robot', Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, vol. 8, no. 7, pp. 814-826. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rasd.2014.03.002

How children with autism spectrum disorder behave and explore the 4-dimensional (spatial 3D + time) environment during a joint attention induction task with a robot. / Anzalone, Salvatore; Tilmont, Elodie; Boucenna, Sofiane; Xavier, Jean; Jouen, Anne-Lise; Bodeau, Nicolas; Maharatna, Koushik; Chetouani, Mohamed; Cohen, David; Bonfiglio, Silvio; Apicella, Fabio; Muratori, Filippo; Narzisi, Antonio; Sicca, Federico; Billeci, Lucia; Pioggia, Giovanni; Cruciani, Federico; Paggetti, Cristiano; Giuliano, Angele; Francisa, Maryrose; Das, Saptarshi; Jamal, Wasifa; Galway, Leo; Donnelly, Mark.

In: Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, Vol. 8, No. 7, 01.07.2014, p. 814-826.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - How children with autism spectrum disorder behave and explore the 4-dimensional (spatial 3D + time) environment during a joint attention induction task with a robot

AU - Anzalone, Salvatore

AU - Tilmont, Elodie

AU - Boucenna, Sofiane

AU - Xavier, Jean

AU - Jouen, Anne-Lise

AU - Bodeau, Nicolas

AU - Maharatna, Koushik

AU - Chetouani, Mohamed

AU - Cohen, David

AU - Bonfiglio, Silvio

AU - Apicella, Fabio

AU - Muratori, Filippo

AU - Narzisi, Antonio

AU - Sicca, Federico

AU - Billeci, Lucia

AU - Pioggia, Giovanni

AU - Cruciani, Federico

AU - Paggetti, Cristiano

AU - Giuliano, Angele

AU - Francisa, Maryrose

AU - Das, Saptarshi

AU - Jamal, Wasifa

AU - Galway, Leo

AU - Donnelly, Mark

PY - 2014/7/1

Y1 - 2014/7/1

N2 - We aimed to compare, during a joint attention (JA) elicitation task, how children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and children with typical development (TD) behave and explore their 4 dimensional (meaning spatial 3D + time) when interacting with a human or with a robotic agent.We built a system that employed a Nao robot and a perception system based on a RGB-D sensor (Kinect) to capture social engagement cues. A JA induction experiment was performed in which children with ASD (N = 16) and matched TD children (N = 16) had a 3-min interaction with the robot or with a therapist. Nao induced JA by gazing; by gazing and pointing; and by gazing, pointing and vocalizing at pictures. Both groups of children performed well with the therapist. However, with Nao, both groups had lower JA scores, and the children with ASD had a significantly lower score than the TD children. We found that (i) multimodal JA induction was more efficient in both groups; (ii) the 3D spatial world gaze exploration showed less accuracy; and (iii) the trunk position in ASD showed less stability in the 4 dimensions compared to TD controls.We conclude that, in ASD, JA skill depends on the interaction partner, and implies a higher motor and cognitive cost.

AB - We aimed to compare, during a joint attention (JA) elicitation task, how children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and children with typical development (TD) behave and explore their 4 dimensional (meaning spatial 3D + time) when interacting with a human or with a robotic agent.We built a system that employed a Nao robot and a perception system based on a RGB-D sensor (Kinect) to capture social engagement cues. A JA induction experiment was performed in which children with ASD (N = 16) and matched TD children (N = 16) had a 3-min interaction with the robot or with a therapist. Nao induced JA by gazing; by gazing and pointing; and by gazing, pointing and vocalizing at pictures. Both groups of children performed well with the therapist. However, with Nao, both groups had lower JA scores, and the children with ASD had a significantly lower score than the TD children. We found that (i) multimodal JA induction was more efficient in both groups; (ii) the 3D spatial world gaze exploration showed less accuracy; and (iii) the trunk position in ASD showed less stability in the 4 dimensions compared to TD controls.We conclude that, in ASD, JA skill depends on the interaction partner, and implies a higher motor and cognitive cost.

KW - Autism spectrum disorder

KW - Development

KW - Social engagement

KW - Joint attention

KW - Social robots

U2 - 10.1016/j.rasd.2014.03.002

DO - 10.1016/j.rasd.2014.03.002

M3 - Article

VL - 8

SP - 814

EP - 826

JO - Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders

T2 - Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders

JF - Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders

SN - 1750-9467

IS - 7

ER -