Home advantage in Gaelic football: the effect of divisional status, season and team ability

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Abstract

Evidence suggests that home advantage (HA) is present when home teams win over 50% of home games played. This studyinvestigated the effect of divisional status, season and team abilityon HA within Gealic football. The sample included 1973 matches from 32 teams over a 9-season period. HA was calculated based onthe number of points gained at home conveyed as a percentage of total points gained (Pollard and Pollard, 2005). A linear regression analysis was utilised to control for ability by adjusting HA (Pollardand Gómez, 2007). In this study, HA (57.4%) is present andsignificantly greater (P < 0.001) than the null value of 50%. HAwithin Gaelic football is comparable to other team-based sports.Despite a decline with the last decade, HA has stabilised andremains above the proposed 50%. Team ability would appear tohave a significant influence (P < 0.05) on HA, while season anddivisional status does not. Future research should investigatefurther causes of HA (i.e. crowd, travel and familiarity) includingtheir impact (if any) on HA within Gaelic games.
LanguageEnglish
Pages1-9
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Performance Analysis in Sport
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 4 Oct 2018

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sports
travel
regression analysis
sampling

Keywords

  • Gaelic football
  • Home advantage
  • Divisional status
  • Ability
  • Season

Cite this

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title = "Home advantage in Gaelic football: the effect of divisional status, season and team ability",
abstract = "Evidence suggests that home advantage (HA) is present when home teams win over 50{\%} of home games played. This studyinvestigated the effect of divisional status, season and team abilityon HA within Gealic football. The sample included 1973 matches from 32 teams over a 9-season period. HA was calculated based onthe number of points gained at home conveyed as a percentage of total points gained (Pollard and Pollard, 2005). A linear regression analysis was utilised to control for ability by adjusting HA (Pollardand G{\'o}mez, 2007). In this study, HA (57.4{\%}) is present andsignificantly greater (P < 0.001) than the null value of 50{\%}. HAwithin Gaelic football is comparable to other team-based sports.Despite a decline with the last decade, HA has stabilised andremains above the proposed 50{\%}. Team ability would appear tohave a significant influence (P < 0.05) on HA, while season anddivisional status does not. Future research should investigatefurther causes of HA (i.e. crowd, travel and familiarity) includingtheir impact (if any) on HA within Gaelic games.",
keywords = "Gaelic football, Home advantage, Divisional status, Ability, Season",
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