Holocene Paleo-Geographic Reconstructions of the Ramore Head Area, Northern Ireland, Using Geophysical and Geotechnical Data: Paleo-Landscape Mapping and Archaeological Implications

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We present early to Mid‐Holocene paleo‐geographic reconstructions for the Ramore Head area (Northern Ireland). This coastal area is characterized by Mesolithic occupation (c. 10–6 ka) and preserved early–Mid‐Holocene peats both on‐ and offshore. This paper improves on previous reconstructions by employing a backstripping methodology, which removes accumulated recent deposits from identified buried paleo‐landsurfaces instead of using modern topography as an analogue to the past landscape. Paleo‐landsurfaces are identified offshore from seismic profiles supplemented by cores, and onshore through legacy borehole records. The paleo‐landsurface can be traced offshore to depths of −2 to −19 m and is buried by <5 m of modern sediment. It extends onshore under the coastal town of Portrush and is buried <2.5–10 m below modern ground level. The identified paleo‐landsurface is combined with sea‐level curves from recent Glacio‐Isostatic‐Adjustment models to reconstruct marine transgression during the early–Mid‐Holocene. Comparison is also made with reconstructions based on modern topography. Together, the identified paleo‐landsurfaces and revised reconstructions can assist future site prospection on‐ and offshore and delimit high‐potential areas for heritage management. Revised reconstructions also allow placement of extant archaeology into a more accurate context of landscape change and help develop insights into local‐scale site location patterns.
LanguageEnglish
Pages411-430
JournalGeoarchaeology: An International Journal
Volume29
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

reconstruction
Holocene
topography
geography
Mesolithic
landscape change
archaeology
transgression
occupation
borehole
town
Northern Ireland
Archaeology
sea level
methodology
management
sediment
Mid-Holocene
Coast
Topography

Cite this

@article{87fb7dcf902a44ffbe4700083bd7688c,
title = "Holocene Paleo-Geographic Reconstructions of the Ramore Head Area, Northern Ireland, Using Geophysical and Geotechnical Data: Paleo-Landscape Mapping and Archaeological Implications",
abstract = "We present early to Mid‐Holocene paleo‐geographic reconstructions for the Ramore Head area (Northern Ireland). This coastal area is characterized by Mesolithic occupation (c. 10–6 ka) and preserved early–Mid‐Holocene peats both on‐ and offshore. This paper improves on previous reconstructions by employing a backstripping methodology, which removes accumulated recent deposits from identified buried paleo‐landsurfaces instead of using modern topography as an analogue to the past landscape. Paleo‐landsurfaces are identified offshore from seismic profiles supplemented by cores, and onshore through legacy borehole records. The paleo‐landsurface can be traced offshore to depths of −2 to −19 m and is buried by <5 m of modern sediment. It extends onshore under the coastal town of Portrush and is buried <2.5–10 m below modern ground level. The identified paleo‐landsurface is combined with sea‐level curves from recent Glacio‐Isostatic‐Adjustment models to reconstruct marine transgression during the early–Mid‐Holocene. Comparison is also made with reconstructions based on modern topography. Together, the identified paleo‐landsurfaces and revised reconstructions can assist future site prospection on‐ and offshore and delimit high‐potential areas for heritage management. Revised reconstructions also allow placement of extant archaeology into a more accurate context of landscape change and help develop insights into local‐scale site location patterns.",
author = "K Westley and R Plets and R Quinn",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1002/gea.21489",
language = "English",
volume = "29",
pages = "411--430",
journal = "Geoarchaeology",
issn = "0883-6353",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Holocene Paleo-Geographic Reconstructions of the Ramore Head Area, Northern Ireland, Using Geophysical and Geotechnical Data: Paleo-Landscape Mapping and Archaeological Implications

AU - Westley, K

AU - Plets, R

AU - Quinn, R

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - We present early to Mid‐Holocene paleo‐geographic reconstructions for the Ramore Head area (Northern Ireland). This coastal area is characterized by Mesolithic occupation (c. 10–6 ka) and preserved early–Mid‐Holocene peats both on‐ and offshore. This paper improves on previous reconstructions by employing a backstripping methodology, which removes accumulated recent deposits from identified buried paleo‐landsurfaces instead of using modern topography as an analogue to the past landscape. Paleo‐landsurfaces are identified offshore from seismic profiles supplemented by cores, and onshore through legacy borehole records. The paleo‐landsurface can be traced offshore to depths of −2 to −19 m and is buried by <5 m of modern sediment. It extends onshore under the coastal town of Portrush and is buried <2.5–10 m below modern ground level. The identified paleo‐landsurface is combined with sea‐level curves from recent Glacio‐Isostatic‐Adjustment models to reconstruct marine transgression during the early–Mid‐Holocene. Comparison is also made with reconstructions based on modern topography. Together, the identified paleo‐landsurfaces and revised reconstructions can assist future site prospection on‐ and offshore and delimit high‐potential areas for heritage management. Revised reconstructions also allow placement of extant archaeology into a more accurate context of landscape change and help develop insights into local‐scale site location patterns.

AB - We present early to Mid‐Holocene paleo‐geographic reconstructions for the Ramore Head area (Northern Ireland). This coastal area is characterized by Mesolithic occupation (c. 10–6 ka) and preserved early–Mid‐Holocene peats both on‐ and offshore. This paper improves on previous reconstructions by employing a backstripping methodology, which removes accumulated recent deposits from identified buried paleo‐landsurfaces instead of using modern topography as an analogue to the past landscape. Paleo‐landsurfaces are identified offshore from seismic profiles supplemented by cores, and onshore through legacy borehole records. The paleo‐landsurface can be traced offshore to depths of −2 to −19 m and is buried by <5 m of modern sediment. It extends onshore under the coastal town of Portrush and is buried <2.5–10 m below modern ground level. The identified paleo‐landsurface is combined with sea‐level curves from recent Glacio‐Isostatic‐Adjustment models to reconstruct marine transgression during the early–Mid‐Holocene. Comparison is also made with reconstructions based on modern topography. Together, the identified paleo‐landsurfaces and revised reconstructions can assist future site prospection on‐ and offshore and delimit high‐potential areas for heritage management. Revised reconstructions also allow placement of extant archaeology into a more accurate context of landscape change and help develop insights into local‐scale site location patterns.

U2 - 10.1002/gea.21489

DO - 10.1002/gea.21489

M3 - Article

VL - 29

SP - 411

EP - 430

JO - Geoarchaeology

T2 - Geoarchaeology

JF - Geoarchaeology

SN - 0883-6353

IS - 6

ER -