Health care professionals’perspectives of advance care planning for people with dementia living in long-term care settings: A narrative review of the literature

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Abstract

This paper provides an overview of the evidence on the perspective of health care professionals(HCPs) in relation to advance care planning (ACP) for people with dementia, residing in long-termcare settings. A narrative approach was adopted to provide a comprehensive synthesis ofpreviously published literature in the area. A systematic literature search identified 14 papersfor inclusion. Following review of the studies four themes were identified for discussion; Earlyintegration and planning for palliative care in dementia; HCPs ethical and moral concernsregarding ACP; Communication challenges when interacting with the person with dementiaand their families and HCPs need for education and training. Despite evidence, that HCPsrecognise the potential benefits of ACP, they struggle with its implementation in this setting.Greater understanding of dementia and the concept of ACP is required to improveconsistency in practice. Synthesising the existing evidence will allow for further understandingof the key issues, potentially resulting in improved implementation in practice
LanguageEnglish
Pages486-512
Number of pages27
JournalDementia
Volume16
Issue number4
Early online date16 Sep 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2017

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dementia
health care
narrative
planning
evidence
inclusion
literature
human being
communication
education

Keywords

  • advance care planning
  • end-of-life decision making
  • nursing home
  • health care professionals

Cite this

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abstract = "This paper provides an overview of the evidence on the perspective of health care professionals(HCPs) in relation to advance care planning (ACP) for people with dementia, residing in long-termcare settings. A narrative approach was adopted to provide a comprehensive synthesis ofpreviously published literature in the area. A systematic literature search identified 14 papersfor inclusion. Following review of the studies four themes were identified for discussion; Earlyintegration and planning for palliative care in dementia; HCPs ethical and moral concernsregarding ACP; Communication challenges when interacting with the person with dementiaand their families and HCPs need for education and training. Despite evidence, that HCPsrecognise the potential benefits of ACP, they struggle with its implementation in this setting.Greater understanding of dementia and the concept of ACP is required to improveconsistency in practice. Synthesising the existing evidence will allow for further understandingof the key issues, potentially resulting in improved implementation in practice",
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