Group based video-conferencing for adults with depression: findings from a user-led qualitative data analysis using participatory theme elicitation

Paul Best, Tracey McConnell, Gavin Davidson, Jennifer Badham, Ruth Neill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)
1 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Background: Accessing support services for depression has been historically difficult given the societal stigma that
exists regarding the condition. Recent advances in digital technologies continue to be postulated as a potential
panacea yet the results from research trials have been mixed with a range of effect sizes.
Methods: This article offers a different perspective by presenting a panel of end users (co-researchers) with
qualitative interview data (n = 8) taken from a feasibility RCT of a group based video-conferencing service for
depressed adults. The co-researcher panel were introduced to a new method of participatory data analysis known
as Participatory Theme Elicitation (PTE). This method involves using network analysis techniques to create groupings
and visual diagrams in order to support the generation of themes and minimise scientific researcher input/
influence.
Results: Co-researchers reported that while VC based interventions appeared convenient, accessible and relatively
low cost - additional training and support should be offered to improve uptake and retention. In addition, coresearchers suggested that further exploration is needed regarding the level of self-awareness one feels in a group
based VC environment and whether this facilitates disclosure (through disinhibition) or increases anxiety.
Conclusion: The findings presented here appear to support existing (researcher and academic-led) literature in the
field as well as suggest new areas for investigation. By presenting data generated solely by co-researchers, this
article also adds to the evidence surrounding participatory analysis methods - particularly the growing need for
robust approaches that are accessible and less time-consuming than those currently available.
Original languageEnglish
Article number40
Pages (from-to)1-11
Number of pages11
JournalResearch Involvement and Engagement
Volume5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 5 Dec 2019

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