Government funded event organisations – good and bad practice

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

AbstractPurposeThis paper examined how the structure of government funded event agencies affected the development of the events industry in Northern Ireland. The institutional arrangements for two agencies which operated at different times in Northern Ireland were analysed.MethodologyA total of sixty-two in-depth interviews were conducted with event organisers and public officials who had worked directly with these two organisations.FindingsThe standalone National Events Agency which began operating in 1999 was found to be more hands-on and worked closely with event organisers to develop the quality of their event. As a quango it worked at arms length from government. Unfortunately it abused this freedom and used public monies to manage its own events highlighting the need for transparency and accountability when managing this type of agency. In 2008 it was replaced by an Events Unit which was set up within the National Tourism Organisation. Under this structure event tourism and not event development was the priority. For the events industry this created development issues and reduced its clout at government level. Originality/ValueThis paper addressed a gap in the literature and found that the institutional arrangements did affect how a government funded events agency operated and what it regarded as a strategic priority. This in turn had repercussions for the development of the events industry.
LanguageEnglish
Pages200-214
JournalInternational Journal of Event and Festival Management
Volume6
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2015

Fingerprint

Government
Industry
Northern Ireland
Institutional arrangements
In-depth interviews
Transparency
Event tourism
Accountability
Tourism

Keywords

  • Key Words: Institutional Arrangements
  • Industry Development
  • Event Tourism
  • Northern Ireland

Cite this

@article{5807b2afa012463ba22d0ff2e7d50d4f,
title = "Government funded event organisations – good and bad practice",
abstract = "AbstractPurposeThis paper examined how the structure of government funded event agencies affected the development of the events industry in Northern Ireland. The institutional arrangements for two agencies which operated at different times in Northern Ireland were analysed.MethodologyA total of sixty-two in-depth interviews were conducted with event organisers and public officials who had worked directly with these two organisations.FindingsThe standalone National Events Agency which began operating in 1999 was found to be more hands-on and worked closely with event organisers to develop the quality of their event. As a quango it worked at arms length from government. Unfortunately it abused this freedom and used public monies to manage its own events highlighting the need for transparency and accountability when managing this type of agency. In 2008 it was replaced by an Events Unit which was set up within the National Tourism Organisation. Under this structure event tourism and not event development was the priority. For the events industry this created development issues and reduced its clout at government level. Originality/ValueThis paper addressed a gap in the literature and found that the institutional arrangements did affect how a government funded events agency operated and what it regarded as a strategic priority. This in turn had repercussions for the development of the events industry.",
keywords = "Key Words: Institutional Arrangements, Industry Development, Event Tourism, Northern Ireland",
author = "Adrian Devine and Frances Devine",
note = "Reference text: Allen, J. , O’Toole, W. , McDonnell, I. and Harris, R. (2011), Festival and Special Event Management , 5th ed., Wiley, Chichester. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER 2. Andre, R. (2010), “Assessing the accountability of government-sponsored enterprises and quangos”, Journal of Business Ethics , Vol. 97 No. 1, pp. 271-289. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER [Infotrieve] 3. Baum, T. (1995), “Ireland – the Peace Dividend”, Insights, July 9-14, pp. 2-4. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER 4. Birrell, D. (2008), “Devolution and quangos in the United Kingdom: the implementation of principles and polices for rationalization and democratization”, Policy Studies , Vol. 29 No. 10, pp. 35-49. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER [Infotrieve] 5. Bowdin, G. , McDonnell, I. , Allen, J. and O’Toole, W. (2011), Events Management , 3rd ed., Butterworth Heinemann, London. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER 6. Chalip, L. (2004), “Beyond impact: a general model for event leverage”, in Ritchie, B. and Adair, D. (Eds), Sport Tourism – Interrelationships, Impacts and Issues , Channel View, London, pp. 54-69. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER 7. Chwe, M. (1998), “Culture, circles and commercials. Publicity, common knowledge and social coordination”, Rationality and Society , Vol. 10 No. 1, pp. 47-75. [CrossRef], [ISI]OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER [Infotrieve] 8. Clarke, G. (2008), Local Development Benefits from Staging Global Events , OECD, Paris. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER 9. Devine, A. , Boyd, S. and Boyle, E. (2011), “Towards a theory of collaborative advantage for the sports tourism policy arena”, International Journal of Public Sector Management , Vol. 24 No. 1, pp. 23-41. [Abstract]OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER [Infotrieve] 10. Dredge, D. and Whitford, M. (2010), “Policy for sustainable and responsible festivals and events: institutionalisation of a new paradigm – a response”, Journal of Policy Research in Tourism, Leisure and Events , Vol. 2 No. 1, pp. 1-13. [CrossRef]OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER [Infotrieve] 11. Foley, M. , McGillivary, D. and McPherson, G. (2011), Event Policy – From Theory to Strategy , Routledge, London. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER 12. Getz, D. (2007), Event Studies: Theory, Research and Policy for Planned Events , Elsevier, Oxford. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER 13. Getz, D. (2009), “Policy for sustainable and responsible festivals and events: institutionalization of a new paradigm”, Journal of Policy Research in Tourism, Leisure and Events , Vol. 1 No. 1, pp. 61-78. [CrossRef]OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER [Infotrieve] 14. Getz, D. (2012), Event Studies: Theory, Research and Policy for Planned Events , 2nd ed., Elsevier, London. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER 15. Getz, D. (2013), Event Tourism – Concepts, International Case Studies and Research , Cognizant Communication Corporation, New York, NY. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER 16. Hall, C. and Rusher, K. (2004), “Politics, public policy and the destination”, in Yeoman, I. , Robertson, M. , Ali-Knight, J. , Drummond, S. and McMahon-Beattie, U. (Eds), Festivals and Events Management: An International Arts and Culture Perspective , Elsevier, Oxford, pp. 217-231. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER 17. Hall, M. (1992), Hallmark Tourist Events: Impacts, Management and Planning , Belhaven Press, London. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER 18. Heitmann, S. and David, L. (2010), “Sustainability and events management”, in Robinson, P. , Wale, D. and Dickson, G. (Eds), Events Management , CABI, Wallingford, CT, pp. 181-200. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER 19. Higham, J. (2005), Sport Tourism Destinations - Issues, Opportunities and Analysis , Butterworth and Heinemann, London. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER 20. Ilczuk, D. and Kulikowska, M. (2007), Festival Jungle, Policy Desert? Festival Polices of Public Authorities in Europe , Circle, Warsaw. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER 21. Jago, L. , Chalip, L. , Brown, G. , Mules, T. and Shameem, A. (2003), “Building events into destination branding: Insights from experts”, Event Management , Vol. 8 No. 1, pp. 3-14. [CrossRef]OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER [Infotrieve] 22. Koppell, J. (2003), The Politics of Quasi-Government: Hybrid Organisations and the Dynamics of Bureaucratic Control , Cambridge University Press, Cambridge. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER 23. KPMG (2008), “Northern Ireland Events Company – Ministerial Report”, June 2008, Belfast. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER 24. Lawton, L. and Weaver, D. (2010), “Normative and innovative sustainable resource management at birding festivals”, Tourism Management , Vol. 31 No. 1, pp. 527-536. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER [Infotrieve] 25. Moscardo, G. (2007), “Analyzing the role of festival and events in regional development”, Event Management , Vol. 11 Nos 1-2, pp. 23-32. [CrossRef]OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER [Infotrieve] 26. Northern Ireland Tourist Board (2010), “Draft tourism strategy for Northern Ireland, 2010-20”. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER 27. Northern Ireland Tourist Board (2013), “Funding guidelines lines for applicants 2013”. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER 28. O’Brien, D. (2011), “Who is in charge? Liverpool, European capital of culture 2008 and the governance of cultural planning”, Town Planning Review , Vol. 82 No. 1, pp. 49-59. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER [Infotrieve] 29. Quinn, B. (2012), “Festival, events and tourism”, in Jamal, T. and Robinson, M. (Eds), The Sage Handbook of Tourism Studies , Sage, London, pp. 234-245. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER 30. Quinn, B. (2013), Key Concepts in Event Management , Sage, London. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER 31. Raj, R. , Walters, P. and Rashid, T. (2013), Events Management: Principles and Practice , 2nd ed., Sage, London. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER 32. Ritchie, J. (1984), “Assessing the impact of hallmark events: conceptual and research issues”, Journal of Travel Research , Vol. 23 No. 1, pp. 2-11. [CrossRef]OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER [Infotrieve] 33. Saunders, M. , Lewis, P. and Thornhill, A. (2010), Research Methods for Business Students , Pearson Education, Harlow. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER 34. Schimmel, K. (2006), “Deep play: sports mega events and urban social conditions in the USA”, Sociological Review , Vol. 54 No. 2, pp. 160 -174. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER [Infotrieve] 35. Smith, A. (2012), Events and Urban Regeneration. The Strategic Use of Events to Revitalise Cities , Routledge, London. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER 36. Veal, A. (2006), Research Methods for Leisure and Tourism – A Practical Guide , Prentice Hall, London. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER 37. Whitford, M. (2009), “A framework for the development of event public policy: facilitating regional development”, Tourism Management , Vol. 30 No. 1, pp. 674-682. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER [Infotrieve] 38. Zammit, V. (2015), “Pride, identity and authenticity in community festivals and events in Malta”, in Jepson, A. and Clarke, A. (Eds), Exploring Community Festivals and Events , Routledge, London, pp. 118-129. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER Further reading 1. Ferdinand, N. and Kitchin, P. (2012), Events Management and International Approach , Sage, London. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER 2. Visit Britain (2010), Foresight, Issue 83, September 2012, pp. 11-12. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER",
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Government funded event organisations – good and bad practice. / Devine, Adrian; Devine, Frances.

In: International Journal of Event and Festival Management, Vol. 6, No. 3, 01.10.2015, p. 200-214.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Government funded event organisations – good and bad practice

AU - Devine, Adrian

AU - Devine, Frances

N1 - Reference text: Allen, J. , O’Toole, W. , McDonnell, I. and Harris, R. (2011), Festival and Special Event Management , 5th ed., Wiley, Chichester. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER 2. Andre, R. (2010), “Assessing the accountability of government-sponsored enterprises and quangos”, Journal of Business Ethics , Vol. 97 No. 1, pp. 271-289. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER [Infotrieve] 3. Baum, T. (1995), “Ireland – the Peace Dividend”, Insights, July 9-14, pp. 2-4. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER 4. Birrell, D. (2008), “Devolution and quangos in the United Kingdom: the implementation of principles and polices for rationalization and democratization”, Policy Studies , Vol. 29 No. 10, pp. 35-49. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER [Infotrieve] 5. Bowdin, G. , McDonnell, I. , Allen, J. and O’Toole, W. (2011), Events Management , 3rd ed., Butterworth Heinemann, London. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER 6. Chalip, L. (2004), “Beyond impact: a general model for event leverage”, in Ritchie, B. and Adair, D. (Eds), Sport Tourism – Interrelationships, Impacts and Issues , Channel View, London, pp. 54-69. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER 7. Chwe, M. (1998), “Culture, circles and commercials. Publicity, common knowledge and social coordination”, Rationality and Society , Vol. 10 No. 1, pp. 47-75. [CrossRef], [ISI]OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER [Infotrieve] 8. Clarke, G. (2008), Local Development Benefits from Staging Global Events , OECD, Paris. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER 9. Devine, A. , Boyd, S. and Boyle, E. (2011), “Towards a theory of collaborative advantage for the sports tourism policy arena”, International Journal of Public Sector Management , Vol. 24 No. 1, pp. 23-41. [Abstract]OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER [Infotrieve] 10. Dredge, D. and Whitford, M. (2010), “Policy for sustainable and responsible festivals and events: institutionalisation of a new paradigm – a response”, Journal of Policy Research in Tourism, Leisure and Events , Vol. 2 No. 1, pp. 1-13. [CrossRef]OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER [Infotrieve] 11. Foley, M. , McGillivary, D. and McPherson, G. (2011), Event Policy – From Theory to Strategy , Routledge, London. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER 12. Getz, D. (2007), Event Studies: Theory, Research and Policy for Planned Events , Elsevier, Oxford. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER 13. Getz, D. (2009), “Policy for sustainable and responsible festivals and events: institutionalization of a new paradigm”, Journal of Policy Research in Tourism, Leisure and Events , Vol. 1 No. 1, pp. 61-78. [CrossRef]OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER [Infotrieve] 14. Getz, D. (2012), Event Studies: Theory, Research and Policy for Planned Events , 2nd ed., Elsevier, London. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER 15. Getz, D. (2013), Event Tourism – Concepts, International Case Studies and Research , Cognizant Communication Corporation, New York, NY. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER 16. Hall, C. and Rusher, K. (2004), “Politics, public policy and the destination”, in Yeoman, I. , Robertson, M. , Ali-Knight, J. , Drummond, S. and McMahon-Beattie, U. (Eds), Festivals and Events Management: An International Arts and Culture Perspective , Elsevier, Oxford, pp. 217-231. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER 17. Hall, M. (1992), Hallmark Tourist Events: Impacts, Management and Planning , Belhaven Press, London. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER 18. Heitmann, S. and David, L. (2010), “Sustainability and events management”, in Robinson, P. , Wale, D. and Dickson, G. (Eds), Events Management , CABI, Wallingford, CT, pp. 181-200. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER 19. Higham, J. (2005), Sport Tourism Destinations - Issues, Opportunities and Analysis , Butterworth and Heinemann, London. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER 20. Ilczuk, D. and Kulikowska, M. (2007), Festival Jungle, Policy Desert? Festival Polices of Public Authorities in Europe , Circle, Warsaw. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER 21. Jago, L. , Chalip, L. , Brown, G. , Mules, T. and Shameem, A. (2003), “Building events into destination branding: Insights from experts”, Event Management , Vol. 8 No. 1, pp. 3-14. [CrossRef]OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER [Infotrieve] 22. Koppell, J. (2003), The Politics of Quasi-Government: Hybrid Organisations and the Dynamics of Bureaucratic Control , Cambridge University Press, Cambridge. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER 23. KPMG (2008), “Northern Ireland Events Company – Ministerial Report”, June 2008, Belfast. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER 24. Lawton, L. and Weaver, D. (2010), “Normative and innovative sustainable resource management at birding festivals”, Tourism Management , Vol. 31 No. 1, pp. 527-536. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER [Infotrieve] 25. Moscardo, G. (2007), “Analyzing the role of festival and events in regional development”, Event Management , Vol. 11 Nos 1-2, pp. 23-32. [CrossRef]OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER [Infotrieve] 26. Northern Ireland Tourist Board (2010), “Draft tourism strategy for Northern Ireland, 2010-20”. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER 27. Northern Ireland Tourist Board (2013), “Funding guidelines lines for applicants 2013”. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER 28. O’Brien, D. (2011), “Who is in charge? Liverpool, European capital of culture 2008 and the governance of cultural planning”, Town Planning Review , Vol. 82 No. 1, pp. 49-59. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER [Infotrieve] 29. Quinn, B. (2012), “Festival, events and tourism”, in Jamal, T. and Robinson, M. (Eds), The Sage Handbook of Tourism Studies , Sage, London, pp. 234-245. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER 30. Quinn, B. (2013), Key Concepts in Event Management , Sage, London. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER 31. Raj, R. , Walters, P. and Rashid, T. (2013), Events Management: Principles and Practice , 2nd ed., Sage, London. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER 32. Ritchie, J. (1984), “Assessing the impact of hallmark events: conceptual and research issues”, Journal of Travel Research , Vol. 23 No. 1, pp. 2-11. [CrossRef]OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER [Infotrieve] 33. Saunders, M. , Lewis, P. and Thornhill, A. (2010), Research Methods for Business Students , Pearson Education, Harlow. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER 34. Schimmel, K. (2006), “Deep play: sports mega events and urban social conditions in the USA”, Sociological Review , Vol. 54 No. 2, pp. 160 -174. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER [Infotrieve] 35. Smith, A. (2012), Events and Urban Regeneration. The Strategic Use of Events to Revitalise Cities , Routledge, London. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER 36. Veal, A. (2006), Research Methods for Leisure and Tourism – A Practical Guide , Prentice Hall, London. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER 37. Whitford, M. (2009), “A framework for the development of event public policy: facilitating regional development”, Tourism Management , Vol. 30 No. 1, pp. 674-682. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER [Infotrieve] 38. Zammit, V. (2015), “Pride, identity and authenticity in community festivals and events in Malta”, in Jepson, A. and Clarke, A. (Eds), Exploring Community Festivals and Events , Routledge, London, pp. 118-129. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER Further reading 1. Ferdinand, N. and Kitchin, P. (2012), Events Management and International Approach , Sage, London. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER 2. Visit Britain (2010), Foresight, Issue 83, September 2012, pp. 11-12. OpenURL UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER

PY - 2015/10/1

Y1 - 2015/10/1

N2 - AbstractPurposeThis paper examined how the structure of government funded event agencies affected the development of the events industry in Northern Ireland. The institutional arrangements for two agencies which operated at different times in Northern Ireland were analysed.MethodologyA total of sixty-two in-depth interviews were conducted with event organisers and public officials who had worked directly with these two organisations.FindingsThe standalone National Events Agency which began operating in 1999 was found to be more hands-on and worked closely with event organisers to develop the quality of their event. As a quango it worked at arms length from government. Unfortunately it abused this freedom and used public monies to manage its own events highlighting the need for transparency and accountability when managing this type of agency. In 2008 it was replaced by an Events Unit which was set up within the National Tourism Organisation. Under this structure event tourism and not event development was the priority. For the events industry this created development issues and reduced its clout at government level. Originality/ValueThis paper addressed a gap in the literature and found that the institutional arrangements did affect how a government funded events agency operated and what it regarded as a strategic priority. This in turn had repercussions for the development of the events industry.

AB - AbstractPurposeThis paper examined how the structure of government funded event agencies affected the development of the events industry in Northern Ireland. The institutional arrangements for two agencies which operated at different times in Northern Ireland were analysed.MethodologyA total of sixty-two in-depth interviews were conducted with event organisers and public officials who had worked directly with these two organisations.FindingsThe standalone National Events Agency which began operating in 1999 was found to be more hands-on and worked closely with event organisers to develop the quality of their event. As a quango it worked at arms length from government. Unfortunately it abused this freedom and used public monies to manage its own events highlighting the need for transparency and accountability when managing this type of agency. In 2008 it was replaced by an Events Unit which was set up within the National Tourism Organisation. Under this structure event tourism and not event development was the priority. For the events industry this created development issues and reduced its clout at government level. Originality/ValueThis paper addressed a gap in the literature and found that the institutional arrangements did affect how a government funded events agency operated and what it regarded as a strategic priority. This in turn had repercussions for the development of the events industry.

KW - Key Words: Institutional Arrangements

KW - Industry Development

KW - Event Tourism

KW - Northern Ireland

U2 - 10.1108/IJEFM-11-2014-0024

DO - 10.1108/IJEFM-11-2014-0024

M3 - Article

VL - 6

SP - 200

EP - 214

JO - International Journal of Event and Festival Management

T2 - International Journal of Event and Festival Management

JF - International Journal of Event and Festival Management

SN - 1758-2954

IS - 3

ER -