Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP): anti-diabetic and anti-obesity potential?

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Abstract

Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP or gastric inhibitory polypeptide) is a gastrointestinal hormone, which modulates physiological insulin secretion. Due to its insulinotropic activity, there has been a considerable increase of interest in utilising the hormone as a potential therapy for type 2 diabetes. One of the difficulties in attempting to harness the insulinotropic activity of GIP into an effective therapeutic agent is its short biological half-life in the circulation. However, recent years have witnessed the development of a substantial number of designer enzyme-resistant `super GIP' molecules with potent insulinotropic and anti-diabetic properties. In addition, observations in transgenic GIP receptor deficient mice indicate that GIP directly links overnutrition to obesity, therein playing a crucial role in the development of obesity and related metabolic disorders. The present review aims to highlight the rapidly emerging potential therapeutic applications of GIP, and especially, enzyme-resistant GIP analogues. (C) 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
LanguageEnglish
Pages253-263
JournalNeuropeptides
Volume37
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2003

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Obesity
Glucose
Peptides
Overnutrition
Gastric Inhibitory Polypeptide
Gastrointestinal Hormones
Enzymes
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Half-Life
Therapeutics
Hormones
Insulin

Cite this

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title = "Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP): anti-diabetic and anti-obesity potential?",
abstract = "Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP or gastric inhibitory polypeptide) is a gastrointestinal hormone, which modulates physiological insulin secretion. Due to its insulinotropic activity, there has been a considerable increase of interest in utilising the hormone as a potential therapy for type 2 diabetes. One of the difficulties in attempting to harness the insulinotropic activity of GIP into an effective therapeutic agent is its short biological half-life in the circulation. However, recent years have witnessed the development of a substantial number of designer enzyme-resistant `super GIP' molecules with potent insulinotropic and anti-diabetic properties. In addition, observations in transgenic GIP receptor deficient mice indicate that GIP directly links overnutrition to obesity, therein playing a crucial role in the development of obesity and related metabolic disorders. The present review aims to highlight the rapidly emerging potential therapeutic applications of GIP, and especially, enzyme-resistant GIP analogues. (C) 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.",
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AU - Gault, Victor

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N2 - Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP or gastric inhibitory polypeptide) is a gastrointestinal hormone, which modulates physiological insulin secretion. Due to its insulinotropic activity, there has been a considerable increase of interest in utilising the hormone as a potential therapy for type 2 diabetes. One of the difficulties in attempting to harness the insulinotropic activity of GIP into an effective therapeutic agent is its short biological half-life in the circulation. However, recent years have witnessed the development of a substantial number of designer enzyme-resistant `super GIP' molecules with potent insulinotropic and anti-diabetic properties. In addition, observations in transgenic GIP receptor deficient mice indicate that GIP directly links overnutrition to obesity, therein playing a crucial role in the development of obesity and related metabolic disorders. The present review aims to highlight the rapidly emerging potential therapeutic applications of GIP, and especially, enzyme-resistant GIP analogues. (C) 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

AB - Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP or gastric inhibitory polypeptide) is a gastrointestinal hormone, which modulates physiological insulin secretion. Due to its insulinotropic activity, there has been a considerable increase of interest in utilising the hormone as a potential therapy for type 2 diabetes. One of the difficulties in attempting to harness the insulinotropic activity of GIP into an effective therapeutic agent is its short biological half-life in the circulation. However, recent years have witnessed the development of a substantial number of designer enzyme-resistant `super GIP' molecules with potent insulinotropic and anti-diabetic properties. In addition, observations in transgenic GIP receptor deficient mice indicate that GIP directly links overnutrition to obesity, therein playing a crucial role in the development of obesity and related metabolic disorders. The present review aims to highlight the rapidly emerging potential therapeutic applications of GIP, and especially, enzyme-resistant GIP analogues. (C) 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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