Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide analogues and their therapeutic potential for the treatment of obesity-diabetes

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Abstract

Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) is a key incretin hormone, released postprandially into the circulation in response to feeding, producing a glucose-dependent stimulation of insulin secretion. It is this glucose-dependency that has attracted attention towards GIP as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. A major drawback to achieving this goal has been the rapid degradation of circulating GIP by the ubiquitous enzyme, dipeptidylpeptidase IV (DPP IV). However, recent studies have described a number of novel structurally modified analogues of GIP with enhanced plasma stability, insulinotropic and antihyperglycaemic activity. The purpose of this article was to provide an overview of the biological effects of several GIP modifications and to highlight the potential of such analogues in the treatment of type 2 diabetes and obesity. (C) 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
LanguageEnglish
Pages207-213
JournalBiochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
Volume308
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2003

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Obesity
Glucose
Peptides
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Therapeutics
Incretins
Hypoglycemic Agents
Hormones
Insulin
Enzymes

Cite this

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title = "Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide analogues and their therapeutic potential for the treatment of obesity-diabetes",
abstract = "Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) is a key incretin hormone, released postprandially into the circulation in response to feeding, producing a glucose-dependent stimulation of insulin secretion. It is this glucose-dependency that has attracted attention towards GIP as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. A major drawback to achieving this goal has been the rapid degradation of circulating GIP by the ubiquitous enzyme, dipeptidylpeptidase IV (DPP IV). However, recent studies have described a number of novel structurally modified analogues of GIP with enhanced plasma stability, insulinotropic and antihyperglycaemic activity. The purpose of this article was to provide an overview of the biological effects of several GIP modifications and to highlight the potential of such analogues in the treatment of type 2 diabetes and obesity. (C) 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.",
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AB - Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) is a key incretin hormone, released postprandially into the circulation in response to feeding, producing a glucose-dependent stimulation of insulin secretion. It is this glucose-dependency that has attracted attention towards GIP as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. A major drawback to achieving this goal has been the rapid degradation of circulating GIP by the ubiquitous enzyme, dipeptidylpeptidase IV (DPP IV). However, recent studies have described a number of novel structurally modified analogues of GIP with enhanced plasma stability, insulinotropic and antihyperglycaemic activity. The purpose of this article was to provide an overview of the biological effects of several GIP modifications and to highlight the potential of such analogues in the treatment of type 2 diabetes and obesity. (C) 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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