Global climate evolution during the last deglaciation

Peter U Clark, Jeremy D. Shakun, Paul A. Baker, Patrick J. Bartlein, Simon Brewer, Ed Brook, Anders E. Carlson, Hai Cheng, Darrell S. Kaufman, Zhengyu Liu, Thomas M. Marchitto, Alan C. Mix, Carrie Morrill, Bette L. Otto-Bliesner, Katharina Pahnke, James M. Russell, Cathy Whitlock, Jess F. Adkins, Jessica L. Blois, Jorie Clark & 11 others Steven M. Colman, William B. Curry, Ben P. Flower, Feng He, Thomas C. Johnson, Jean Lynch-Stieglitz, Vera Markgraf, Jerry McManus, Jerry X. Mitrovica, Patricio I. Moreno, John W. Williams

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    191 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Deciphering the evolution of global climate from the end of the Last Glacial Maximum approximately 19 ka to the early Holocene 11 ka presents an outstanding opportunity for understanding the transient response of Earth’s climate system to external and internal forcings. During this interval of global warming, the decay of ice sheets caused global mean sea level to rise by approximately 80 m; terrestrial and marine ecosystems experienced large disturbances and range shifts; perturbations to the carbon cycle resulted in a net release of the greenhouse gases CO2 and CH4 to the atmosphere; and changes in atmosphere and ocean circulation affected the global distribution and fluxes of water and heat. Here we summarize a major effort by the paleoclimate research community to characterize these changes through the development of well-dated, high-resolution records of the deep and intermediate ocean as well as surface climate. Our synthesis indicates that the superposition of two modes explains much of the variability in regional and global climate during the last deglaciation, with a strong association between the first mode and variations in greenhouse gases, and between the second mode and variations in the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation.
    LanguageEnglish
    PagesE1134-E1142
    JournalPROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
    Volume109
    Issue number19
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - May 2012

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    last deglaciation
    global climate
    greenhouse gas
    atmosphere
    meridional circulation
    climate
    Last Glacial Maximum
    terrestrial ecosystem
    carbon cycle
    paleoclimate
    marine ecosystem
    regional climate
    ice sheet
    global warming
    sea surface
    perturbation
    Holocene
    sea level
    disturbance
    water

    Cite this

    Clark, P. U., Shakun, J. D., Baker, P. A., Bartlein, P. J., Brewer, S., Brook, E., ... Williams, J. W. (2012). Global climate evolution during the last deglaciation. PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, 109(19), E1134-E1142. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1116619109
    Clark, Peter U ; Shakun, Jeremy D. ; Baker, Paul A. ; Bartlein, Patrick J. ; Brewer, Simon ; Brook, Ed ; Carlson, Anders E. ; Cheng, Hai ; Kaufman, Darrell S. ; Liu, Zhengyu ; Marchitto, Thomas M. ; Mix, Alan C. ; Morrill, Carrie ; Otto-Bliesner, Bette L. ; Pahnke, Katharina ; Russell, James M. ; Whitlock, Cathy ; Adkins, Jess F. ; Blois, Jessica L. ; Clark, Jorie ; Colman, Steven M. ; Curry, William B. ; Flower, Ben P. ; He, Feng ; Johnson, Thomas C. ; Lynch-Stieglitz, Jean ; Markgraf, Vera ; McManus, Jerry ; Mitrovica, Jerry X. ; Moreno, Patricio I. ; Williams, John W. / Global climate evolution during the last deglaciation. In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. 2012 ; Vol. 109, No. 19. pp. E1134-E1142.
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    abstract = "Deciphering the evolution of global climate from the end of the Last Glacial Maximum approximately 19 ka to the early Holocene 11 ka presents an outstanding opportunity for understanding the transient response of Earth’s climate system to external and internal forcings. During this interval of global warming, the decay of ice sheets caused global mean sea level to rise by approximately 80 m; terrestrial and marine ecosystems experienced large disturbances and range shifts; perturbations to the carbon cycle resulted in a net release of the greenhouse gases CO2 and CH4 to the atmosphere; and changes in atmosphere and ocean circulation affected the global distribution and fluxes of water and heat. Here we summarize a major effort by the paleoclimate research community to characterize these changes through the development of well-dated, high-resolution records of the deep and intermediate ocean as well as surface climate. Our synthesis indicates that the superposition of two modes explains much of the variability in regional and global climate during the last deglaciation, with a strong association between the first mode and variations in greenhouse gases, and between the second mode and variations in the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation.",
    author = "Clark, {Peter U} and Shakun, {Jeremy D.} and Baker, {Paul A.} and Bartlein, {Patrick J.} and Simon Brewer and Ed Brook and Carlson, {Anders E.} and Hai Cheng and Kaufman, {Darrell S.} and Zhengyu Liu and Marchitto, {Thomas M.} and Mix, {Alan C.} and Carrie Morrill and Otto-Bliesner, {Bette L.} and Katharina Pahnke and Russell, {James M.} and Cathy Whitlock and Adkins, {Jess F.} and Blois, {Jessica L.} and Jorie Clark and Colman, {Steven M.} and Curry, {William B.} and Flower, {Ben P.} and Feng He and Johnson, {Thomas C.} and Jean Lynch-Stieglitz and Vera Markgraf and Jerry McManus and Mitrovica, {Jerry X.} and Moreno, {Patricio I.} and Williams, {John W.}",
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    Clark, PU, Shakun, JD, Baker, PA, Bartlein, PJ, Brewer, S, Brook, E, Carlson, AE, Cheng, H, Kaufman, DS, Liu, Z, Marchitto, TM, Mix, AC, Morrill, C, Otto-Bliesner, BL, Pahnke, K, Russell, JM, Whitlock, C, Adkins, JF, Blois, JL, Clark, J, Colman, SM, Curry, WB, Flower, BP, He, F, Johnson, TC, Lynch-Stieglitz, J, Markgraf, V, McManus, J, Mitrovica, JX, Moreno, PI & Williams, JW 2012, 'Global climate evolution during the last deglaciation', PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, vol. 109, no. 19, pp. E1134-E1142. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1116619109

    Global climate evolution during the last deglaciation. / Clark, Peter U; Shakun, Jeremy D.; Baker, Paul A.; Bartlein, Patrick J.; Brewer, Simon; Brook, Ed; Carlson, Anders E.; Cheng, Hai; Kaufman, Darrell S.; Liu, Zhengyu; Marchitto, Thomas M.; Mix, Alan C.; Morrill, Carrie; Otto-Bliesner, Bette L.; Pahnke, Katharina; Russell, James M.; Whitlock, Cathy; Adkins, Jess F.; Blois, Jessica L.; Clark, Jorie; Colman, Steven M.; Curry, William B.; Flower, Ben P.; He, Feng; Johnson, Thomas C.; Lynch-Stieglitz, Jean; Markgraf, Vera; McManus, Jerry; Mitrovica, Jerry X.; Moreno, Patricio I.; Williams, John W.

    In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Vol. 109, No. 19, 05.2012, p. E1134-E1142.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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    AU - Clark, Peter U

    AU - Shakun, Jeremy D.

    AU - Baker, Paul A.

    AU - Bartlein, Patrick J.

    AU - Brewer, Simon

    AU - Brook, Ed

    AU - Carlson, Anders E.

    AU - Cheng, Hai

    AU - Kaufman, Darrell S.

    AU - Liu, Zhengyu

    AU - Marchitto, Thomas M.

    AU - Mix, Alan C.

    AU - Morrill, Carrie

    AU - Otto-Bliesner, Bette L.

    AU - Pahnke, Katharina

    AU - Russell, James M.

    AU - Whitlock, Cathy

    AU - Adkins, Jess F.

    AU - Blois, Jessica L.

    AU - Clark, Jorie

    AU - Colman, Steven M.

    AU - Curry, William B.

    AU - Flower, Ben P.

    AU - He, Feng

    AU - Johnson, Thomas C.

    AU - Lynch-Stieglitz, Jean

    AU - Markgraf, Vera

    AU - McManus, Jerry

    AU - Mitrovica, Jerry X.

    AU - Moreno, Patricio I.

    AU - Williams, John W.

    PY - 2012/5

    Y1 - 2012/5

    N2 - Deciphering the evolution of global climate from the end of the Last Glacial Maximum approximately 19 ka to the early Holocene 11 ka presents an outstanding opportunity for understanding the transient response of Earth’s climate system to external and internal forcings. During this interval of global warming, the decay of ice sheets caused global mean sea level to rise by approximately 80 m; terrestrial and marine ecosystems experienced large disturbances and range shifts; perturbations to the carbon cycle resulted in a net release of the greenhouse gases CO2 and CH4 to the atmosphere; and changes in atmosphere and ocean circulation affected the global distribution and fluxes of water and heat. Here we summarize a major effort by the paleoclimate research community to characterize these changes through the development of well-dated, high-resolution records of the deep and intermediate ocean as well as surface climate. Our synthesis indicates that the superposition of two modes explains much of the variability in regional and global climate during the last deglaciation, with a strong association between the first mode and variations in greenhouse gases, and between the second mode and variations in the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation.

    AB - Deciphering the evolution of global climate from the end of the Last Glacial Maximum approximately 19 ka to the early Holocene 11 ka presents an outstanding opportunity for understanding the transient response of Earth’s climate system to external and internal forcings. During this interval of global warming, the decay of ice sheets caused global mean sea level to rise by approximately 80 m; terrestrial and marine ecosystems experienced large disturbances and range shifts; perturbations to the carbon cycle resulted in a net release of the greenhouse gases CO2 and CH4 to the atmosphere; and changes in atmosphere and ocean circulation affected the global distribution and fluxes of water and heat. Here we summarize a major effort by the paleoclimate research community to characterize these changes through the development of well-dated, high-resolution records of the deep and intermediate ocean as well as surface climate. Our synthesis indicates that the superposition of two modes explains much of the variability in regional and global climate during the last deglaciation, with a strong association between the first mode and variations in greenhouse gases, and between the second mode and variations in the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation.

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    DO - 10.1073/pnas.1116619109

    M3 - Article

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    SP - E1134-E1142

    JO - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

    T2 - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

    JF - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

    SN - 0027-8424

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