Giving online feedback to 21st Century Students: Ten Turnitin QuickMarks my students want to see in feedback

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The aim of this presentation is to share the ten QuickMarks my students want me to incorporate when I give personalised feedback using Turnitin. The QuickMarks are “standard editing marks that instructors can utilise when editing and reviewing their peers’ papers” (TurnItIn). As most users of Turnitin aware, these comments are static buttons that can be dragged onto a student’s paper in the document viewer. When the student views his or her paper, rolling over the QuickMark with the mouse pointer reveals a pop-up window with a more detailed comment. Generally, QuickMarks address common issues in student writing such as document formatting and errors in capitalization, spelling, punctuation, grammar, and mechanics. Instructors can customise personalised sets of QuickMarks in TurnItIn. Recent Turnitin research shows that students want to see ‘suggestions for improvement’ in their feedback. Therefore, I asked my students to give me three QuickMarks that they would like to see me incorporate in my feedback. To my surprise, I received lot of texting style, social media influenced, funny QuickMarks. This presentation shares some of them. Examples include: IDKWYATA (I do not know what you are talking about; be clear), Selfie (You must avoid using ‘I’ in business report. Use third person)

Conference

ConferenceSolent Learning and Teaching Community Conference 2016
Abbreviated titleSLTCC 2016
CountryUnited Kingdom
CitySouthampton
Period24/06/1624/06/16
Internet address

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student
instructor
formatting
social media
mechanic
grammar
human being

Cite this

@inproceedings{973b7e9602844351accaac03b2db6809,
title = "Giving online feedback to 21st Century Students: Ten Turnitin QuickMarks my students want to see in feedback",
abstract = "The aim of this presentation is to share the ten QuickMarks my students want me to incorporate when I give personalised feedback using Turnitin. The QuickMarks are “standard editing marks that instructors can utilise when editing and reviewing their peers’ papers” (TurnItIn). As most users of Turnitin aware, these comments are static buttons that can be dragged onto a student’s paper in the document viewer. When the student views his or her paper, rolling over the QuickMark with the mouse pointer reveals a pop-up window with a more detailed comment. Generally, QuickMarks address common issues in student writing such as document formatting and errors in capitalization, spelling, punctuation, grammar, and mechanics. Instructors can customise personalised sets of QuickMarks in TurnItIn. Recent Turnitin research shows that students want to see ‘suggestions for improvement’ in their feedback. Therefore, I asked my students to give me three QuickMarks that they would like to see me incorporate in my feedback. To my surprise, I received lot of texting style, social media influenced, funny QuickMarks. This presentation shares some of them. Examples include: IDKWYATA (I do not know what you are talking about; be clear), Selfie (You must avoid using ‘I’ in business report. Use third person)",
author = "Paul Joseph-Richard",
note = "Author confirmed this does not have an ISSN",
year = "2016",
month = "6",
day = "24",
language = "English",
booktitle = "SLTCC2016 Conference Abstracts",

}

Joseph-Richard, P 2016, Giving online feedback to 21st Century Students: Ten Turnitin QuickMarks my students want to see in feedback. in SLTCC2016 Conference Abstracts., 1.7, Solent Learning and Teaching Community Conference 2016, Southampton, United Kingdom, 24/06/16.

Giving online feedback to 21st Century Students: Ten Turnitin QuickMarks my students want to see in feedback. / Joseph-Richard, Paul.

SLTCC2016 Conference Abstracts. 2016. 1.7.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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AB - The aim of this presentation is to share the ten QuickMarks my students want me to incorporate when I give personalised feedback using Turnitin. The QuickMarks are “standard editing marks that instructors can utilise when editing and reviewing their peers’ papers” (TurnItIn). As most users of Turnitin aware, these comments are static buttons that can be dragged onto a student’s paper in the document viewer. When the student views his or her paper, rolling over the QuickMark with the mouse pointer reveals a pop-up window with a more detailed comment. Generally, QuickMarks address common issues in student writing such as document formatting and errors in capitalization, spelling, punctuation, grammar, and mechanics. Instructors can customise personalised sets of QuickMarks in TurnItIn. Recent Turnitin research shows that students want to see ‘suggestions for improvement’ in their feedback. Therefore, I asked my students to give me three QuickMarks that they would like to see me incorporate in my feedback. To my surprise, I received lot of texting style, social media influenced, funny QuickMarks. This presentation shares some of them. Examples include: IDKWYATA (I do not know what you are talking about; be clear), Selfie (You must avoid using ‘I’ in business report. Use third person)

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