Genetics and genetic testing: Are GPs likely to attend training courses?

S McCann, D MacAuley, Y Barnett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. GPs must make difficult screening and diagnostic decisions regarding genetic testing for different cancers. Educational programs may improve knowledge and enable more appropriate referral. Methods. A postal survey of all general practitioners (GPs) in Northern Ireland (N = 534; response rate = 49.4%) asked GPs if they would attend 3 different types of training courses in genetics. Results. Almost 75% indicated that they would be likely and/or very likely to attend such courses. Women and GPs who had been qualified recently were most likely to attend (P < .005, P < .05). Conclusion. The results suggest that GPs are interested in training courses. Male GPs and GPs who have been qualified for longer should be specifically targeted.
LanguageEnglish
Pages225-226
JournalJournal of Cancer Education
Volume19
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 2004

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Genetic Testing
General Practitioners
Northern Ireland
Referral and Consultation
Neoplasms

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McCann, S ; MacAuley, D ; Barnett, Y. / Genetics and genetic testing: Are GPs likely to attend training courses?. In: Journal of Cancer Education. 2004 ; Vol. 19, No. 4. pp. 225-226.
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Genetics and genetic testing: Are GPs likely to attend training courses? / McCann, S; MacAuley, D; Barnett, Y.

In: Journal of Cancer Education, Vol. 19, No. 4, 2004, p. 225-226.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Genetics and genetic testing: Are GPs likely to attend training courses?

AU - McCann, S

AU - MacAuley, D

AU - Barnett, Y

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Y1 - 2004

N2 - Background. GPs must make difficult screening and diagnostic decisions regarding genetic testing for different cancers. Educational programs may improve knowledge and enable more appropriate referral. Methods. A postal survey of all general practitioners (GPs) in Northern Ireland (N = 534; response rate = 49.4%) asked GPs if they would attend 3 different types of training courses in genetics. Results. Almost 75% indicated that they would be likely and/or very likely to attend such courses. Women and GPs who had been qualified recently were most likely to attend (P < .005, P < .05). Conclusion. The results suggest that GPs are interested in training courses. Male GPs and GPs who have been qualified for longer should be specifically targeted.

AB - Background. GPs must make difficult screening and diagnostic decisions regarding genetic testing for different cancers. Educational programs may improve knowledge and enable more appropriate referral. Methods. A postal survey of all general practitioners (GPs) in Northern Ireland (N = 534; response rate = 49.4%) asked GPs if they would attend 3 different types of training courses in genetics. Results. Almost 75% indicated that they would be likely and/or very likely to attend such courses. Women and GPs who had been qualified recently were most likely to attend (P < .005, P < .05). Conclusion. The results suggest that GPs are interested in training courses. Male GPs and GPs who have been qualified for longer should be specifically targeted.

M3 - Article

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SP - 225

EP - 226

JO - Journal of Cancer Education

T2 - Journal of Cancer Education

JF - Journal of Cancer Education

SN - 0885-8195

IS - 4

ER -