Gender differences associated with risk of progression to dementia for different classes of anti-hypertensive drugs

Daman Kaur, Magda Bucholc (Editor), David Finn (Editor), Stephen Todd (Editor), KongFatt Wong-Lin (Editor), Paula McClean (Editor)

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

Various epidemiological studies have shown an association between high midlife blood pressure and late-life incident dementia and cognitive decline. This study evaluated some of the commonly prescribed antihypertensive drugs and their association with progression to dementia from healthy and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) stages. The National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center (NACC) database, one of the largest, most comprehensive longitudinal databases for dementia research was used in this study. Medications analysed, using multivariate logistic regression were antihypertensive combination therapy, angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, anti-adrenergic agents, beta-blockers, calcium (Ca) channel blocking agents, diuretics, vasodilators, and angiotensin II inhibitors. Analyses were conducted at baseline and over time in those who progressed to dementia from healthy and MCI stages. Analyses were further then further stratified by gender. In the case of males, antiadrenergic agents (odds ratio [OR]: 0.71, p: <2e-04), beta-blockers (OR: 0.79, p: 0.0027), and Ca channel blockers (OR: 0.74, p: 0.0012) were associated with reduced risk of progressing to dementia from MCI. For women, ACE inhibitors (OR: 0.73, p: 7e-04) and diuretics (OR: 0.74, p: 8e-04) were associated with a reduced risk of progressing to dementia from the MCI stage, whereas vasodilators (OR: 1.97, p: 0.0037) were associated with increased risk of progressing to dementia from MCI. Treatment of hypertension in midlife is associated with a reduced risk of dementia in later life. However, the effects of different classes of antihypertensive drugs have not been extensively studied. This study demonstrates that different antihypertensive drug classes affect progression to dementia in men and women, warranting further investigation.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationTMED 10
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 11 Sep 2019
EventTMED 10 - Londonderry, Londonderry, United Kingdom
Duration: 11 Sep 2019 → …

Conference

ConferenceTMED 10
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityLondonderry
Period11/09/19 → …

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