Future aspirations of parents and students with severe learning difficulties on leaving special schooling.

Marisa Smyth, Roy McConkey

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    The majority of school-leavers over two years from two special SLD schools in Belfast were individually interviewed (N=34) as were their parents (N=37).The almost unanimous wish of the young people to have a job was not matched by the parents although nearly half of the parents did express the wish that they would have at least part-time work. The majority of young people and the parents envisaged living with the family albeit for different reasons. However there was a strong emphasis on fostering the young person’s independence and living with friends. Consequently only a minority of families mentioned their son or daughter moving into traditional residential care settings.It is argued that it is not just the availability of services that need to increase in order to meet the aspirations of the young people and their parents. Major changes are also needed in their form and function.
    LanguageEnglish
    Pages54-59
    JournalBritish Journal of Learning Disabilities
    Volume31
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2003

    Fingerprint

    learning disorder
    parents
    student
    part-time work
    school
    minority
    human being

    Cite this

    @article{5a3724b6cb61441792bd36da6063b21c,
    title = "Future aspirations of parents and students with severe learning difficulties on leaving special schooling.",
    abstract = "The majority of school-leavers over two years from two special SLD schools in Belfast were individually interviewed (N=34) as were their parents (N=37).The almost unanimous wish of the young people to have a job was not matched by the parents although nearly half of the parents did express the wish that they would have at least part-time work. The majority of young people and the parents envisaged living with the family albeit for different reasons. However there was a strong emphasis on fostering the young person’s independence and living with friends. Consequently only a minority of families mentioned their son or daughter moving into traditional residential care settings.It is argued that it is not just the availability of services that need to increase in order to meet the aspirations of the young people and their parents. Major changes are also needed in their form and function.",
    author = "Marisa Smyth and Roy McConkey",
    year = "2003",
    month = "7",
    day = "1",
    language = "English",
    volume = "31",
    pages = "54--59",
    journal = "British Journal of Learning Disabilities",
    issn = "1354-4187",

    }

    Future aspirations of parents and students with severe learning difficulties on leaving special schooling. / Smyth, Marisa; McConkey, Roy.

    In: British Journal of Learning Disabilities, Vol. 31, 01.07.2003, p. 54-59.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Future aspirations of parents and students with severe learning difficulties on leaving special schooling.

    AU - Smyth, Marisa

    AU - McConkey, Roy

    PY - 2003/7/1

    Y1 - 2003/7/1

    N2 - The majority of school-leavers over two years from two special SLD schools in Belfast were individually interviewed (N=34) as were their parents (N=37).The almost unanimous wish of the young people to have a job was not matched by the parents although nearly half of the parents did express the wish that they would have at least part-time work. The majority of young people and the parents envisaged living with the family albeit for different reasons. However there was a strong emphasis on fostering the young person’s independence and living with friends. Consequently only a minority of families mentioned their son or daughter moving into traditional residential care settings.It is argued that it is not just the availability of services that need to increase in order to meet the aspirations of the young people and their parents. Major changes are also needed in their form and function.

    AB - The majority of school-leavers over two years from two special SLD schools in Belfast were individually interviewed (N=34) as were their parents (N=37).The almost unanimous wish of the young people to have a job was not matched by the parents although nearly half of the parents did express the wish that they would have at least part-time work. The majority of young people and the parents envisaged living with the family albeit for different reasons. However there was a strong emphasis on fostering the young person’s independence and living with friends. Consequently only a minority of families mentioned their son or daughter moving into traditional residential care settings.It is argued that it is not just the availability of services that need to increase in order to meet the aspirations of the young people and their parents. Major changes are also needed in their form and function.

    M3 - Article

    VL - 31

    SP - 54

    EP - 59

    JO - British Journal of Learning Disabilities

    T2 - British Journal of Learning Disabilities

    JF - British Journal of Learning Disabilities

    SN - 1354-4187

    ER -