Florence Fulton Hobson. Architect

Tanja Poppelreuter

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Abstract

    Florence Fulton Hobson (1881-1978) was one of the first three female architects to be licensed by the RIBA and the first women architect in Ireland. Her mother, Mary Ann Bulmer, was a women’s rights campaigner and her younger brother John Bulmer Hobson a well-known Irish nationalist.Fulton Hobson attended the School of Art in Belfast, was an apprentice in the Belfast practices of James John Phillips and James St John Phillips and worked for Edward Guy Dawber and James Glen Sivewright Gibson in London. After returning to Belfast, she worked for the Belfast Corporation from 1905 as an assistant to the Royal Commission on Health and Housing.Little is known of her activities for the Belfast Corporation and only two houses by her have been identified to date. She reflects, however, on the ways in which she negotiated her role as the only women in an all-male profession in several articles published around 1910. In her article “Architecture as a Profession” that was published in The Queen in 1911 she analyses and rejects arguments as to why a woman might encounter difficulties as a practicing architect, while at the same time explaining how architects are educated and accredited. In the context of the suffragette movement and the political situation in Ireland before the 1916 Easter Rising this paper discusses the ways in which Florence Fulton Hobson as the first female Irish architect who was licenced by the RIBA became an advocate for women to enter this profession and to overcome gender bias that threatened to relegate female architects to the realm of domestic architecture only.
    LanguageEnglish
    Title of host publicationUnknown Host Publication
    Number of pages10
    Publication statusAccepted/In press - 25 May 2016
    Event2nd MoMoWo International Conference-Workshop (Ljubljana, 3-5 Oct. 16) - Ljubljana
    Duration: 25 May 2016 → …

    Workshop

    Workshop2nd MoMoWo International Conference-Workshop (Ljubljana, 3-5 Oct. 16)
    Period25/05/16 → …

    Fingerprint

    Florence
    Belfast
    Ireland
    Brothers
    Suffragette
    Health
    Campaigners
    Domestic Architecture
    Apprentice
    Easter
    Art School
    Nationalists

    Keywords

    • Women Architect
    • Ireland

    Cite this

    Poppelreuter, T. (Accepted/In press). Florence Fulton Hobson. Architect. In Unknown Host Publication
    Poppelreuter, Tanja. / Florence Fulton Hobson. Architect. Unknown Host Publication. 2016.
    @inproceedings{3c1d10fbaed64720b1aa831a28d8d5b1,
    title = "Florence Fulton Hobson. Architect",
    abstract = "Florence Fulton Hobson (1881-1978) was one of the first three female architects to be licensed by the RIBA and the first women architect in Ireland. Her mother, Mary Ann Bulmer, was a women’s rights campaigner and her younger brother John Bulmer Hobson a well-known Irish nationalist.Fulton Hobson attended the School of Art in Belfast, was an apprentice in the Belfast practices of James John Phillips and James St John Phillips and worked for Edward Guy Dawber and James Glen Sivewright Gibson in London. After returning to Belfast, she worked for the Belfast Corporation from 1905 as an assistant to the Royal Commission on Health and Housing.Little is known of her activities for the Belfast Corporation and only two houses by her have been identified to date. She reflects, however, on the ways in which she negotiated her role as the only women in an all-male profession in several articles published around 1910. In her article “Architecture as a Profession” that was published in The Queen in 1911 she analyses and rejects arguments as to why a woman might encounter difficulties as a practicing architect, while at the same time explaining how architects are educated and accredited. In the context of the suffragette movement and the political situation in Ireland before the 1916 Easter Rising this paper discusses the ways in which Florence Fulton Hobson as the first female Irish architect who was licenced by the RIBA became an advocate for women to enter this profession and to overcome gender bias that threatened to relegate female architects to the realm of domestic architecture only.",
    keywords = "Women Architect, Ireland",
    author = "Tanja Poppelreuter",
    year = "2016",
    month = "5",
    day = "25",
    language = "English",
    booktitle = "Unknown Host Publication",

    }

    Poppelreuter, T 2016, Florence Fulton Hobson. Architect. in Unknown Host Publication. 2nd MoMoWo International Conference-Workshop (Ljubljana, 3-5 Oct. 16), 25/05/16.

    Florence Fulton Hobson. Architect. / Poppelreuter, Tanja.

    Unknown Host Publication. 2016.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    TY - GEN

    T1 - Florence Fulton Hobson. Architect

    AU - Poppelreuter, Tanja

    PY - 2016/5/25

    Y1 - 2016/5/25

    N2 - Florence Fulton Hobson (1881-1978) was one of the first three female architects to be licensed by the RIBA and the first women architect in Ireland. Her mother, Mary Ann Bulmer, was a women’s rights campaigner and her younger brother John Bulmer Hobson a well-known Irish nationalist.Fulton Hobson attended the School of Art in Belfast, was an apprentice in the Belfast practices of James John Phillips and James St John Phillips and worked for Edward Guy Dawber and James Glen Sivewright Gibson in London. After returning to Belfast, she worked for the Belfast Corporation from 1905 as an assistant to the Royal Commission on Health and Housing.Little is known of her activities for the Belfast Corporation and only two houses by her have been identified to date. She reflects, however, on the ways in which she negotiated her role as the only women in an all-male profession in several articles published around 1910. In her article “Architecture as a Profession” that was published in The Queen in 1911 she analyses and rejects arguments as to why a woman might encounter difficulties as a practicing architect, while at the same time explaining how architects are educated and accredited. In the context of the suffragette movement and the political situation in Ireland before the 1916 Easter Rising this paper discusses the ways in which Florence Fulton Hobson as the first female Irish architect who was licenced by the RIBA became an advocate for women to enter this profession and to overcome gender bias that threatened to relegate female architects to the realm of domestic architecture only.

    AB - Florence Fulton Hobson (1881-1978) was one of the first three female architects to be licensed by the RIBA and the first women architect in Ireland. Her mother, Mary Ann Bulmer, was a women’s rights campaigner and her younger brother John Bulmer Hobson a well-known Irish nationalist.Fulton Hobson attended the School of Art in Belfast, was an apprentice in the Belfast practices of James John Phillips and James St John Phillips and worked for Edward Guy Dawber and James Glen Sivewright Gibson in London. After returning to Belfast, she worked for the Belfast Corporation from 1905 as an assistant to the Royal Commission on Health and Housing.Little is known of her activities for the Belfast Corporation and only two houses by her have been identified to date. She reflects, however, on the ways in which she negotiated her role as the only women in an all-male profession in several articles published around 1910. In her article “Architecture as a Profession” that was published in The Queen in 1911 she analyses and rejects arguments as to why a woman might encounter difficulties as a practicing architect, while at the same time explaining how architects are educated and accredited. In the context of the suffragette movement and the political situation in Ireland before the 1916 Easter Rising this paper discusses the ways in which Florence Fulton Hobson as the first female Irish architect who was licenced by the RIBA became an advocate for women to enter this profession and to overcome gender bias that threatened to relegate female architects to the realm of domestic architecture only.

    KW - Women Architect

    KW - Ireland

    M3 - Conference contribution

    BT - Unknown Host Publication

    ER -

    Poppelreuter T. Florence Fulton Hobson. Architect. In Unknown Host Publication. 2016