Abstract

Made in cooperation with the regular visitors who returned weekly to a few small sales sheds at the heart of a British market city, Flock by Ken Grant marks the end of a ritual that has been an integral part of the midlands working class agricultural community of Hereford for many centuries. Over the course of five years, Grant returned weekly to the same spaces to photograph, marking the decline of land use from one of community participation to one of commercial use.The work is a sustained evaluation of a community as the last inner city livestock market in Britain makes way for the next chapter in Hereford's regeneration programme. The work extends Ken Grant's work with working class communities and is an immersed engagement that has been widely acknowledged. A number of publications were created to coincide with the main publication and consolidated the work as a major collaborative documentary work. The work was reviewed widely, including the Sunday Times, London, British Journal of Photography and exhibited as one person exhibitions in the UK (Hereford and Cardiff) and as part of a major survey show on Agriculture and Photography at Gwinzegal, France.
LanguageEnglish
Place of PublicationDublin
Number of pages96
VolumeN/A
EditionN/A
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2014

Fingerprint

Photography
Working Class
Land Use
Community Participation
Evaluation
Regeneration
Agriculture
Cardiff
Livestock
Documentary
Person
Sunday
Inner City
Regular
France

Keywords

  • Photography, documentary, working class culture, agricultural communities, livestock, city planning and redevelopment,

Cite this

Grant, K. (2014). Flock. (N/A ed.) Dublin.
Grant, Ken. / Flock. N/A ed. Dublin, 2014. 96 p.
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Grant, K 2014, Flock. vol. N/A, N/A edn, Dublin.

Flock. / Grant, Ken.

N/A ed. Dublin, 2014. 96 p.

Research output: Book/ReportBook

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Grant K. Flock. N/A ed. Dublin, 2014. 96 p.