Filmic representations of the British-Irish conflict since the ceasefires of 1994

Cahal McLaughlin

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    Abstract

    Critically analysing several films that were produced in the late 1990s, this chapter outlines the political and cultural conditions of a society emerging from violence, arguing that, while some representations remained tied to stereotypes found during the Troubles, others allowed for a more nuanced appraoch. The films under discussion include, 'Michael Collins', 'Nothing Personal', 'Some Mother's Son' and the short film, ''81'.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationRelocating Britishness:
    EditorsSteven Caunce, Ewa Mazierska, Susan Sydney-Smith, John Walton
    PublisherManchester University Press
    Pages237-251
    ISBN (Print)0 7190 7026 0
    Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2004

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  • Cite this

    McLaughlin, C. (2004). Filmic representations of the British-Irish conflict since the ceasefires of 1994. In S. Caunce, E. Mazierska, S. Sydney-Smith, & J. Walton (Eds.), Relocating Britishness: (pp. 237-251). Manchester University Press.