Families perceptions of the contribution of intellectual disability clinical nurse specialists (ID-CNSs) in Ireland

Owen Doody, Eamonn Slevin, Laurence Taggart

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aim and objectives. To explore families perceptions of the contribution of clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) in intellectual disability nursing in Ireland.Background. CNS roles have developed over the years and are seen as complex and multifaceted, causing confusion, frustration and controversy. 2001 saw the formal introduction of CNS roles in Ireland across nursing including intellectual disability. Design. A exploratory qualitative approach utilising semi-structured one-to-one interviews with 10 family members regarding their perceptions of the CNS in intellectual disability. Methods. Data were audio-recorded, transcribed and analysed using Burnard’s framework. Ethical approval was gained and access granted by service providers. Findings. The study highlights that intellectual disability CNSs contribute and support care deliver across a range of areas including; personal caring, supporting and empowering families, liaison, education and leadership. Conclusions. CNSs have an important role and contribution in supporting families’ and clients, and Ireland is in a unique position to develop knowledge regarding specialist care for people with intellectual disability that can be shared nationally and internationally.Relevance to clinical practice. Ireland is in a unique position to develop knowledge regarding specialist care for people with intellectual disability that can be shared and adapted by other healthcare professionals in other countries that do not have a specialised intellectual disability nurses.
LanguageEnglish
Pagese80-e90
JournalJournal of Clinical Nursing
Volume27
Issue number1-0
Early online date27 Jun 2017
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 27 Jun 2017

Fingerprint

Nurse Clinicians
Ireland
Intellectual Disability
Nurse's Role
Disabled Persons
Nursing
Confusion
Frustration
Nurses
Interviews
Delivery of Health Care
Education

Keywords

  • intellectual disability nursing

Cite this

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abstract = "Aim and objectives. To explore families perceptions of the contribution of clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) in intellectual disability nursing in Ireland.Background. CNS roles have developed over the years and are seen as complex and multifaceted, causing confusion, frustration and controversy. 2001 saw the formal introduction of CNS roles in Ireland across nursing including intellectual disability. Design. A exploratory qualitative approach utilising semi-structured one-to-one interviews with 10 family members regarding their perceptions of the CNS in intellectual disability. Methods. Data were audio-recorded, transcribed and analysed using Burnard’s framework. Ethical approval was gained and access granted by service providers. Findings. The study highlights that intellectual disability CNSs contribute and support care deliver across a range of areas including; personal caring, supporting and empowering families, liaison, education and leadership. Conclusions. CNSs have an important role and contribution in supporting families’ and clients, and Ireland is in a unique position to develop knowledge regarding specialist care for people with intellectual disability that can be shared nationally and internationally.Relevance to clinical practice. Ireland is in a unique position to develop knowledge regarding specialist care for people with intellectual disability that can be shared and adapted by other healthcare professionals in other countries that do not have a specialised intellectual disability nurses.",
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Families perceptions of the contribution of intellectual disability clinical nurse specialists (ID-CNSs) in Ireland. / Doody, Owen; Slevin, Eamonn; Taggart, Laurence.

In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, Vol. 27, No. 1-0, 27.06.2017, p. e80-e90.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AB - Aim and objectives. To explore families perceptions of the contribution of clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) in intellectual disability nursing in Ireland.Background. CNS roles have developed over the years and are seen as complex and multifaceted, causing confusion, frustration and controversy. 2001 saw the formal introduction of CNS roles in Ireland across nursing including intellectual disability. Design. A exploratory qualitative approach utilising semi-structured one-to-one interviews with 10 family members regarding their perceptions of the CNS in intellectual disability. Methods. Data were audio-recorded, transcribed and analysed using Burnard’s framework. Ethical approval was gained and access granted by service providers. Findings. The study highlights that intellectual disability CNSs contribute and support care deliver across a range of areas including; personal caring, supporting and empowering families, liaison, education and leadership. Conclusions. CNSs have an important role and contribution in supporting families’ and clients, and Ireland is in a unique position to develop knowledge regarding specialist care for people with intellectual disability that can be shared nationally and internationally.Relevance to clinical practice. Ireland is in a unique position to develop knowledge regarding specialist care for people with intellectual disability that can be shared and adapted by other healthcare professionals in other countries that do not have a specialised intellectual disability nurses.

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