Extremely short duration interval exercise improves 24-h glycaemia in men with type 2 diabetes

Richard S Metcalfe, Ben Fitzpatrick, Sinead Fitzpatrick, Gary McDermott, Noel Brick, CM McClean, Gareth Davison

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose Reduced-exertion high-intensity interval training (REHIT) is a genuinely time-efficient exercise intervention that improves aerobic capacity and blood pressure in men with type 2 diabetes. However, the acute effects of REHIT on 24-h glycaemia have not been examined. Methods 11 men with type 2 diabetes (mean ± SD: age, 52 ± 6 years; BMI, 29.7 ± 3.1 kg/m2; HbA1c, 7.0 ± 0.8%) participated in a randomised, four-trial crossover study, with continual interstitial glucose measurements captured during a 24-h dietarystandardised period following either (1) no exercise (CON); (2) 30 min of continuous exercise (MICT); (3) 10 × 1 min at ~ 90 HRmax (HIIT; time commitment, ~ 25 min); and (4) 2 × 20 s ‘all-out’ sprints (REHIT; time commitment, 10 min). Results Compared to CON, mean 24-h glucose was lower following REHIT (mean ± 95%CI: − 0.58 ± 0.41 mmol/L, p = 0.008, d = 0.55) and tended to be lower with MICT (− 0.37 ± 0.41 mmol/L, p = 0.08, d = 0.35), but was not significantly altered following HIIT (− 0.37 ± 0.59 mmol/L, p = 0.31, d = 0.35). This seemed to be largely driven by a lower glycaemic response (area under the curve) to dinner following both REHIT and MICT (− 11%, p < 0.05 and d > 0.9 for both) but not HIIT (− 4%, p = 0.22, d = 0.38). Time in hyperglycaemia appeared to be reduced with all three exercise conditions compared with CON (REHIT: − 112 ± 63 min, p = 0.002, d = 0.50; MICT: -115 ± 127 min, p = 0.08, d = 0.50; HIIT − 125 ± 122 min, p = 0.04, d = 0.54), whilst indices of glycaemic variability were not significantly altered. Conclusion REHIT may offer a genuinely time-efficient exercise option for improving 24-h glycaemia in men with type 2 diabetes and warrants further study.
LanguageEnglish
Pages1-12
Number of pages12
JournalEuropean Journal of Applied Physiology
Early online date31 Aug 2018
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 31 Aug 2018

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Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Exercise
Glycemic Index
Glucose
High-Intensity Interval Training
Hyperglycemia
Cross-Over Studies
Area Under Curve
Meals
Blood Pressure

Keywords

  • Exercise
  • High-intensity interval training
  • Postprandial glucose
  • Continuous glucose monitoring
  • Type 2 diabetes

Cite this

@article{fdc7a26cc93745fabf4f792b19498937,
title = "Extremely short duration interval exercise improves 24-h glycaemia in men with type 2 diabetes",
abstract = "Purpose Reduced-exertion high-intensity interval training (REHIT) is a genuinely time-efficient exercise intervention that improves aerobic capacity and blood pressure in men with type 2 diabetes. However, the acute effects of REHIT on 24-h glycaemia have not been examined. Methods 11 men with type 2 diabetes (mean ± SD: age, 52 ± 6 years; BMI, 29.7 ± 3.1 kg/m2; HbA1c, 7.0 ± 0.8{\%}) participated in a randomised, four-trial crossover study, with continual interstitial glucose measurements captured during a 24-h dietarystandardised period following either (1) no exercise (CON); (2) 30 min of continuous exercise (MICT); (3) 10 × 1 min at ~ 90 HRmax (HIIT; time commitment, ~ 25 min); and (4) 2 × 20 s ‘all-out’ sprints (REHIT; time commitment, 10 min). Results Compared to CON, mean 24-h glucose was lower following REHIT (mean ± 95{\%}CI: − 0.58 ± 0.41 mmol/L, p = 0.008, d = 0.55) and tended to be lower with MICT (− 0.37 ± 0.41 mmol/L, p = 0.08, d = 0.35), but was not significantly altered following HIIT (− 0.37 ± 0.59 mmol/L, p = 0.31, d = 0.35). This seemed to be largely driven by a lower glycaemic response (area under the curve) to dinner following both REHIT and MICT (− 11{\%}, p < 0.05 and d > 0.9 for both) but not HIIT (− 4{\%}, p = 0.22, d = 0.38). Time in hyperglycaemia appeared to be reduced with all three exercise conditions compared with CON (REHIT: − 112 ± 63 min, p = 0.002, d = 0.50; MICT: -115 ± 127 min, p = 0.08, d = 0.50; HIIT − 125 ± 122 min, p = 0.04, d = 0.54), whilst indices of glycaemic variability were not significantly altered. Conclusion REHIT may offer a genuinely time-efficient exercise option for improving 24-h glycaemia in men with type 2 diabetes and warrants further study.",
keywords = "Exercise, High-intensity interval training, Postprandial glucose, Continuous glucose monitoring, Type 2 diabetes",
author = "Metcalfe, {Richard S} and Ben Fitzpatrick and Sinead Fitzpatrick and Gary McDermott and Noel Brick and CM McClean and Gareth Davison",
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doi = "10.1007/s00421-018-3980-2",
language = "English",
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Extremely short duration interval exercise improves 24-h glycaemia in men with type 2 diabetes. / Metcalfe, Richard S; Fitzpatrick, Ben; Fitzpatrick, Sinead; McDermott, Gary; Brick, Noel; McClean, CM; Davison, Gareth.

In: European Journal of Applied Physiology, 31.08.2018, p. 1-12.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Extremely short duration interval exercise improves 24-h glycaemia in men with type 2 diabetes

AU - Metcalfe, Richard S

AU - Fitzpatrick, Ben

AU - Fitzpatrick, Sinead

AU - McDermott, Gary

AU - Brick, Noel

AU - McClean, CM

AU - Davison, Gareth

PY - 2018/8/31

Y1 - 2018/8/31

N2 - Purpose Reduced-exertion high-intensity interval training (REHIT) is a genuinely time-efficient exercise intervention that improves aerobic capacity and blood pressure in men with type 2 diabetes. However, the acute effects of REHIT on 24-h glycaemia have not been examined. Methods 11 men with type 2 diabetes (mean ± SD: age, 52 ± 6 years; BMI, 29.7 ± 3.1 kg/m2; HbA1c, 7.0 ± 0.8%) participated in a randomised, four-trial crossover study, with continual interstitial glucose measurements captured during a 24-h dietarystandardised period following either (1) no exercise (CON); (2) 30 min of continuous exercise (MICT); (3) 10 × 1 min at ~ 90 HRmax (HIIT; time commitment, ~ 25 min); and (4) 2 × 20 s ‘all-out’ sprints (REHIT; time commitment, 10 min). Results Compared to CON, mean 24-h glucose was lower following REHIT (mean ± 95%CI: − 0.58 ± 0.41 mmol/L, p = 0.008, d = 0.55) and tended to be lower with MICT (− 0.37 ± 0.41 mmol/L, p = 0.08, d = 0.35), but was not significantly altered following HIIT (− 0.37 ± 0.59 mmol/L, p = 0.31, d = 0.35). This seemed to be largely driven by a lower glycaemic response (area under the curve) to dinner following both REHIT and MICT (− 11%, p < 0.05 and d > 0.9 for both) but not HIIT (− 4%, p = 0.22, d = 0.38). Time in hyperglycaemia appeared to be reduced with all three exercise conditions compared with CON (REHIT: − 112 ± 63 min, p = 0.002, d = 0.50; MICT: -115 ± 127 min, p = 0.08, d = 0.50; HIIT − 125 ± 122 min, p = 0.04, d = 0.54), whilst indices of glycaemic variability were not significantly altered. Conclusion REHIT may offer a genuinely time-efficient exercise option for improving 24-h glycaemia in men with type 2 diabetes and warrants further study.

AB - Purpose Reduced-exertion high-intensity interval training (REHIT) is a genuinely time-efficient exercise intervention that improves aerobic capacity and blood pressure in men with type 2 diabetes. However, the acute effects of REHIT on 24-h glycaemia have not been examined. Methods 11 men with type 2 diabetes (mean ± SD: age, 52 ± 6 years; BMI, 29.7 ± 3.1 kg/m2; HbA1c, 7.0 ± 0.8%) participated in a randomised, four-trial crossover study, with continual interstitial glucose measurements captured during a 24-h dietarystandardised period following either (1) no exercise (CON); (2) 30 min of continuous exercise (MICT); (3) 10 × 1 min at ~ 90 HRmax (HIIT; time commitment, ~ 25 min); and (4) 2 × 20 s ‘all-out’ sprints (REHIT; time commitment, 10 min). Results Compared to CON, mean 24-h glucose was lower following REHIT (mean ± 95%CI: − 0.58 ± 0.41 mmol/L, p = 0.008, d = 0.55) and tended to be lower with MICT (− 0.37 ± 0.41 mmol/L, p = 0.08, d = 0.35), but was not significantly altered following HIIT (− 0.37 ± 0.59 mmol/L, p = 0.31, d = 0.35). This seemed to be largely driven by a lower glycaemic response (area under the curve) to dinner following both REHIT and MICT (− 11%, p < 0.05 and d > 0.9 for both) but not HIIT (− 4%, p = 0.22, d = 0.38). Time in hyperglycaemia appeared to be reduced with all three exercise conditions compared with CON (REHIT: − 112 ± 63 min, p = 0.002, d = 0.50; MICT: -115 ± 127 min, p = 0.08, d = 0.50; HIIT − 125 ± 122 min, p = 0.04, d = 0.54), whilst indices of glycaemic variability were not significantly altered. Conclusion REHIT may offer a genuinely time-efficient exercise option for improving 24-h glycaemia in men with type 2 diabetes and warrants further study.

KW - Exercise

KW - High-intensity interval training

KW - Postprandial glucose

KW - Continuous glucose monitoring

KW - Type 2 diabetes

U2 - 10.1007/s00421-018-3980-2

DO - 10.1007/s00421-018-3980-2

M3 - Article

SP - 1

EP - 12

JO - European Journal of Applied Physiology

T2 - European Journal of Applied Physiology

JF - European Journal of Applied Physiology

SN - 1439-6319

ER -