Export Problems of Internationalising SMEs: some empirical evidence using a critical incident technique

Fred Scharf, James Bell, Sharon Loane, Richard Fletcher

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

One of the most frequently researched topics in the exporting literature is into the barriers and problems facing small internationalizing firms (see Miesenböck, 1988; Katsikeas, 1991; Leonidou, 1995, for comprehensive reviews of the literature). Typically and regardless of the location of the studies, most conclude that small firms face major problems in terms of the financial aspects of exporting (competitive pricing, delays in payment, foreign exchange risk, and so on). They also report difficulties in non-tariff barriers, import regulations, export documentation, obtaining suitable representation, modifying international product and/or communications strategies and overcoming cultural differences (Rabino, 1980; Bodur, 1986; Karafagliou, 1986; Bannock and Partners, 1987; Morgan, 1997; Crick and Chaudhry, 2000a; da Silva and da Rocha, 2001). However, the dominant use of positivist methodologies, a prevalence of single-country investigations and a general absence of qualitative triangulation mean that while the problems may have been adequately quantified, there is little real understanding of their context and nature, or of the underlying issues that need to be addressed. Thus, ensuing recommendations are often little more than vague attempts to provide guidance to small-firm decision-makers on alleviating current or anticipated export problems. They also tend to lack the depth of detail required by policy-makers in order to provide appropriate, adequate and timely support to such firms. Given these limitations, Easterby-Smith et al. (1994) suggest that mixed methodologies involving qualitative approaches can usefully be employed in conjunction with business surveys in...
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationResearching New Frontiers, Advances in International Business
EditorsMV Jones, P Dimitratos
Place of PublicationHants, UK
Pages103-127
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2004

Fingerprint

Empirical evidence
Small and medium-sized enterprises
Small firms
Critical incident technique
Exporting
Methodology
Qualitative approaches
Import
Delay in payments
Politicians
Decision maker
Non-tariff barriers
Business survey
Guidance
Documentation
Communication strategies
Cultural differences
Triangulation
Pricing
Foreign exchange risk

Keywords

  • Exports
  • barriers
  • critical incidents

Cite this

Scharf, F., Bell, J., Loane, S., & Fletcher, R. (2004). Export Problems of Internationalising SMEs: some empirical evidence using a critical incident technique. In MV. Jones, & P. Dimitratos (Eds.), Researching New Frontiers, Advances in International Business (pp. 103-127). Hants, UK. https://doi.org/10.4337/9781845420635.00014
Scharf, Fred ; Bell, James ; Loane, Sharon ; Fletcher, Richard. / Export Problems of Internationalising SMEs: some empirical evidence using a critical incident technique. Researching New Frontiers, Advances in International Business. editor / MV Jones ; P Dimitratos. Hants, UK, 2004. pp. 103-127
@inbook{3338352812d240b4a568e3b200b23161,
title = "Export Problems of Internationalising SMEs: some empirical evidence using a critical incident technique",
abstract = "One of the most frequently researched topics in the exporting literature is into the barriers and problems facing small internationalizing firms (see Miesenb{\"o}ck, 1988; Katsikeas, 1991; Leonidou, 1995, for comprehensive reviews of the literature). Typically and regardless of the location of the studies, most conclude that small firms face major problems in terms of the financial aspects of exporting (competitive pricing, delays in payment, foreign exchange risk, and so on). They also report difficulties in non-tariff barriers, import regulations, export documentation, obtaining suitable representation, modifying international product and/or communications strategies and overcoming cultural differences (Rabino, 1980; Bodur, 1986; Karafagliou, 1986; Bannock and Partners, 1987; Morgan, 1997; Crick and Chaudhry, 2000a; da Silva and da Rocha, 2001). However, the dominant use of positivist methodologies, a prevalence of single-country investigations and a general absence of qualitative triangulation mean that while the problems may have been adequately quantified, there is little real understanding of their context and nature, or of the underlying issues that need to be addressed. Thus, ensuing recommendations are often little more than vague attempts to provide guidance to small-firm decision-makers on alleviating current or anticipated export problems. They also tend to lack the depth of detail required by policy-makers in order to provide appropriate, adequate and timely support to such firms. Given these limitations, Easterby-Smith et al. (1994) suggest that mixed methodologies involving qualitative approaches can usefully be employed in conjunction with business surveys in...",
keywords = "Exports, barriers, critical incidents",
author = "Fred Scharf and James Bell and Sharon Loane and Richard Fletcher",
year = "2004",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.4337/9781845420635.00014",
language = "English",
isbn = "1 84376 136 X",
pages = "103--127",
editor = "MV Jones and P Dimitratos",
booktitle = "Researching New Frontiers, Advances in International Business",

}

Scharf, F, Bell, J, Loane, S & Fletcher, R 2004, Export Problems of Internationalising SMEs: some empirical evidence using a critical incident technique. in MV Jones & P Dimitratos (eds), Researching New Frontiers, Advances in International Business. Hants, UK, pp. 103-127. https://doi.org/10.4337/9781845420635.00014

Export Problems of Internationalising SMEs: some empirical evidence using a critical incident technique. / Scharf, Fred; Bell, James; Loane, Sharon; Fletcher, Richard.

Researching New Frontiers, Advances in International Business. ed. / MV Jones; P Dimitratos. Hants, UK, 2004. p. 103-127.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

TY - CHAP

T1 - Export Problems of Internationalising SMEs: some empirical evidence using a critical incident technique

AU - Scharf, Fred

AU - Bell, James

AU - Loane, Sharon

AU - Fletcher, Richard

PY - 2004/4/1

Y1 - 2004/4/1

N2 - One of the most frequently researched topics in the exporting literature is into the barriers and problems facing small internationalizing firms (see Miesenböck, 1988; Katsikeas, 1991; Leonidou, 1995, for comprehensive reviews of the literature). Typically and regardless of the location of the studies, most conclude that small firms face major problems in terms of the financial aspects of exporting (competitive pricing, delays in payment, foreign exchange risk, and so on). They also report difficulties in non-tariff barriers, import regulations, export documentation, obtaining suitable representation, modifying international product and/or communications strategies and overcoming cultural differences (Rabino, 1980; Bodur, 1986; Karafagliou, 1986; Bannock and Partners, 1987; Morgan, 1997; Crick and Chaudhry, 2000a; da Silva and da Rocha, 2001). However, the dominant use of positivist methodologies, a prevalence of single-country investigations and a general absence of qualitative triangulation mean that while the problems may have been adequately quantified, there is little real understanding of their context and nature, or of the underlying issues that need to be addressed. Thus, ensuing recommendations are often little more than vague attempts to provide guidance to small-firm decision-makers on alleviating current or anticipated export problems. They also tend to lack the depth of detail required by policy-makers in order to provide appropriate, adequate and timely support to such firms. Given these limitations, Easterby-Smith et al. (1994) suggest that mixed methodologies involving qualitative approaches can usefully be employed in conjunction with business surveys in...

AB - One of the most frequently researched topics in the exporting literature is into the barriers and problems facing small internationalizing firms (see Miesenböck, 1988; Katsikeas, 1991; Leonidou, 1995, for comprehensive reviews of the literature). Typically and regardless of the location of the studies, most conclude that small firms face major problems in terms of the financial aspects of exporting (competitive pricing, delays in payment, foreign exchange risk, and so on). They also report difficulties in non-tariff barriers, import regulations, export documentation, obtaining suitable representation, modifying international product and/or communications strategies and overcoming cultural differences (Rabino, 1980; Bodur, 1986; Karafagliou, 1986; Bannock and Partners, 1987; Morgan, 1997; Crick and Chaudhry, 2000a; da Silva and da Rocha, 2001). However, the dominant use of positivist methodologies, a prevalence of single-country investigations and a general absence of qualitative triangulation mean that while the problems may have been adequately quantified, there is little real understanding of their context and nature, or of the underlying issues that need to be addressed. Thus, ensuing recommendations are often little more than vague attempts to provide guidance to small-firm decision-makers on alleviating current or anticipated export problems. They also tend to lack the depth of detail required by policy-makers in order to provide appropriate, adequate and timely support to such firms. Given these limitations, Easterby-Smith et al. (1994) suggest that mixed methodologies involving qualitative approaches can usefully be employed in conjunction with business surveys in...

KW - Exports

KW - barriers

KW - critical incidents

U2 - 10.4337/9781845420635.00014

DO - 10.4337/9781845420635.00014

M3 - Chapter

SN - 1 84376 136 X

SP - 103

EP - 127

BT - Researching New Frontiers, Advances in International Business

A2 - Jones, MV

A2 - Dimitratos, P

CY - Hants, UK

ER -

Scharf F, Bell J, Loane S, Fletcher R. Export Problems of Internationalising SMEs: some empirical evidence using a critical incident technique. In Jones MV, Dimitratos P, editors, Researching New Frontiers, Advances in International Business. Hants, UK. 2004. p. 103-127 https://doi.org/10.4337/9781845420635.00014