Exploring the knowledge base of trauma and trauma informed care of staff working in community residential accommodation for adults with an intellectual disability

Patrick McNally, Mandy Irvine , Laurence Taggart, M Shevlin, John Keesler

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Abstract

Background: Taking a trauma informed care approach has demonstrated positive outcomes for services for people in the general population. Given the increased vulnerability to psychological trauma for adults with an intellectual disability, this study explores what residential staff know about trauma and trauma informed care. Methods: Thirty-two staffs representing three staff groups: direct care staff; managers; and specialist practitioners, were interviewed using semi-structured interviews, which were analysed following a structured framework. Findings: Each staff group held different perspectives in their knowledge of trauma and trauma informed care. Limitations were noted in staffs' knowledge of trauma, implementation of evidence-based supports, and access to specialist services for adults with an intellectual disability. All participants highlighted their training needs regarding trauma. Conclusion: Increased training on recognising and responding to trauma is needed among community staff supporting those with a trauma history if organisations are to move towards trauma informed care.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities
Early online date26 Apr 2022
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 26 Apr 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 The Authors. Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

Keywords

  • Intellectual disability
  • residential
  • staff
  • trauma
  • trauma informed care
  • ORIGINAL ARTICLES
  • intellectual disability
  • ORIGINAL ARTICLE

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