Exploring Responses to the Collapse of Devolution in Northern Ireland 2017–2020 through the Lens of Multi-Level Governance

Deirdre Heenan, Derek Birrell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)
120 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The system of devolution set up in Northern Ireland in 1999 has proved volatile and unstable. In 2017, the Northern Ireland Executive collapsed, following the resignation of the Sinn Féin, deputy First Minister. For a three-year period, Executive and legislative devolution ceased to operate. The UK Government opted not to impose Direct Rule from Westminster, as happened previously. This article examines the consequences of the absence of a devolved government in the context of the existing system of multi-level governance (MLG). It is contended that mitigating action taken or considered to address the gap in governance can be best understood using an analytical framework drawn from the lens of MLG. A range of interventions, adjustments and interactions occurred involving the remaining levels of MLG. Despite the fall of the Executive and Assembly an amended form of governance continued to function in Northern Ireland.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)596–615
Number of pages20
JournalParliamentary Affairs
Volume75
Issue number3
Early online date19 Mar 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished (in print/issue) - 31 Jul 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 The Author(s). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Hansard Society.

Keywords

  • Law
  • Sociology and Political Science

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