Experimental investigation of externally venting flames geometric characteristics and impact on the façade of corridor-like enclosures

Konstantinos Chotzoglou, Eleni Asimakopoulou, Jianping Zhang, Michael Delichatsios

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Understanding of the physics and mechanisms of fire development and externally venting flames (EVF) in corridor-like enclosures is fundamental to studying fire spread to adjacent floors in high-rise buildings. This work aims to investigate the burning behaviour of a liquid fuel pool fire in a corridor-like enclosure and to identify the key factors influencing EVF characteristics and its impact on façades. A series of experiments is conducted in a medium-scale corridor-facade configuration using ethanol pool fires. A new fuel supply system has been developed to keep the fuel level constant to minimize lip effects. The influence of fuel surface area and ventilation factor on the fire development is also investigated. Experimental measurements consist of mass loss, heat release rate, temperatures and heat fluxes inside the corridor and on the facade. Three distinct burning regions are observed and their characteristics depend on both the pan size and ventilation factor. A power dependence of EVF height in relation to excess external heat release rate has been found. The impact of EVF on the façade is investigated by measuring heat flux on the façade using thin steel plate probes. It is found that the characteristics of EVF strongly depend on opening dimensions and for large opening widths EVF tend to emerge from the opening as two separate fire plumes.

Original languageEnglish
Article number042023
JournalJournal of Physics: Conference Series
Volume1107
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 Nov 2018

Keywords

  • corridor-like enclosure
  • façade fire
  • flame height
  • heat flux
  • liquid pool fire

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